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Johannes Raabe, Katrin Schmidt, Johannes Carl and Oliver Höner

in regard to the engagement); and relatedness (i.e., feeling like a valued and accepted member of a group). In turn, need fulfillment is influenced by various motivational determinants—or social factors—within the environment. It is not surprising that the role of physical education (PE) teachers and

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Yubing Wang and Ang Chen

Lifelong physical activity (PA) promotion has been acknowledged as one primary goal of physical education (PE; Corbin, 2002 ; Ennis, 2017a ; Green, 2014 ; Society of Health and Physical Educators [SHAPE] America, 2014 ). This goal implies that PE should emphasize PA promotion not only in school

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Dean J. Kriellaars, John Cairney, Marco A.C. Bortoleto, Tia K.M. Kiez, Dean Dudley and Patrice Aubertin

, 2012 ). Historically, physical education (PE) in Canada and the United States has focused on a sport-centric model, with sport skill instruction and competitive games being the foundation of most PE curricula offerings ( Berryman, 2010 ). There is a need to shift away from this emphasis toward a public

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Stéphanie Girard, Jérôme St-Amand and Roch Chouinard

important in their daily lives” 1 ( Ministère de l’Éducation, du Loisir et du Sport, 2011b , p. 469), physical education (PE) remains one of the best opportunities for students to be physically active at school ( Brusseau & Kulinna, 2015 ) and to help them develop lifelong healthy habits in their leisure

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Arzu Erden and Murat Emirzeoğlu

has indicated that this relationship is weak and needs to be explained from different perspectives. 2 In addition to the physical performance of athletes, there is a need for further research into individuals’ level of body awareness, performance emotional state (PES), and demographic characteristics

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Christopher J. Hirth

Column-editor : Darin A. Padua

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Jason Bushie and Charles Lobe

Column-editor : Patrick Sexton

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Natalie L. Myers and Gilson J. Capilouto

Adherence is a documented problem in collegiate athletics. The patient–clinician relationship is an important component of how one will receive the idea of rehabilitation and adhere to the prescribed treatment protocol. Attachment theory states that an emotional bond between two individuals usually flourishes when one individual looks for support and assurance during a time of need. Attachment theory was initially proposed to describe the parent–child relationship and has implications into adulthood. If clinicians understand and recognize the different attachment styles a given patient might portray, then the relationship between the two may flourish, and consequently lead to greater adherence. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to propose a model for improving treatment adherence by adjusting the patient–clinician relationship based on a patient’s attachment style.

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Jason Bushie and Charles Lobe

Column-editor : Patrick Sexton

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Darrin M. Smith

Column-editor : R. Barry Dale