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Alessandra de Carvalho Bastone, Bruno de Souza Moreira, Renata Alvarenga Vieira, Renata Noce Kirkwood, João Marcos Domingues Dias and Rosângela Corrêa Dias

The purpose of this study was to assess the validity of the Human Activity Profile (HAP) by comparing scores with accelerometer data and by objectively testing its cutoff points. This study included 120 older women (age 60–90 years). Average daily time spent in sedentary, moderate, and hard activity; counts; number of steps; and energy expenditure were measured using an accelerometer. Spearman rank order correlations were used to evaluate the correlation between the HAP scores and accelerometer variables. Significant relationships were detected (rho = .47−.75, p < .001), indicating that the HAP estimates physical activity at a group level well; however, scatterplots showed individual errors. Receiver operating characteristic curves were constructed to determine HAP cutoff points on the basis of physical activity level recommendations, and the cutoff points found were similar to the original HAP cutoff points. The HAP is a useful indicator of physical activity levels in older women.

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Gopal K. Singh, Michael D. Kogan, Mohammad Siahpush and Peter C. van Dyck

Background:

This study examines state and regional disparities in vigorous physical activity levels among US children age 6 to 17 years.

Methods:

The 2003 National Survey of Children’s Health was used to calculate vigorous physical activity (VPA) and no days of vigorous physical activity (NVPA) prevalence by state and geographic region. Logistic and least squares regression were used to analyze geographic disparities.

Results:

Vigorous physical activity levels varied substantially across geographic areas, with the East Southcentral region of the US having the highest NVPA prevalence (13.4%) and the Pacific region the lowest prevalence (9.1%). Children in Georgia and Tennessee had 2.2 to 2.3 times higher odds and children in DC, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Indiana, Kentucky, Kansas, New Jersey, South Carolina, and Washington (adjusted prevalence >13.4%) had 1.8 to 2.0 times higher odds of NVPA than children in California (adjusted prevalence = 8.4%). Adjustment for race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, social capital, television viewing, sleep behavior, and parental physical activity doubled the magnitude of geographic disparities in vigorous physical activity levels. Area poverty, income inequality, and violent crime rates were independent predictors of VPA and NVPA.

Conclusions:

Although individual and area-level socioeconomic factors are important predictors, substantial geographic disparities remain, with children in several Southern states having particularly high risks of NVPA.

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Salih A. Salih, Nancye M. Peel, Di Enright and Wendy Marshall

medication* 9 (5–13) Note . 4WW = four-wheeled walker; TCP = Transitional Care Program; RUDAS = Rowland Universal Dementia Assessment Scale. * Median (IQR). Physical Activities Level The median (IQR) for daily walking time on admission was 35 (20–54) minutes. This had significantly improved on discharge to

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Patrick Abi Nader, Evan Hilberg, John M. Schuna, Deborah H. John and Katherine B. Gunter

children . Rural Remote Health . 2008 ; 8 ( 2 ): 810 . PubMed 5. Davy BM , Harrell K , Stewart JJ , King DS . Body weight status, dietary habits, and physical activity levels of middle school-aged children in rural Mississippi . South Med J . 2004 ; 97 ( 6 ): 571 – 577 . PubMed doi:10

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Sofiya Alhassan, Christine W. St. Laurent, Sarah Burkart, Cory J. Greever and Matthew N. Ahmadi

preschoolers’ physical activity levels . Pediatr Exerc Sci . 2012 ; 24 ( 3 ): 435 – 449 . PubMed ID: 22971559 doi:10.1123/pes.24.3.435 10.1123/pes.24.3.435 22971559 19. Alhassan S , Nwaokelemeh O , Lyden K , Goldsby T , Mendoza A . A pilot study to examine the effect of additional structured

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Veronika van der Wardt, Jennie E. Hancox, Clare Burgon, Rupinder Bajwa, Sarah Goldberg and Rowan H. Harwood

7-day period was used in the analysis. This particular PA monitor was chosen, as it did not show activity levels (e.g., number of daily steps) without being linked to the software. Therefore, it was assumed that wearing the monitor would be less likely to influence activity levels. For the current

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Kyle L. Timmerman, Kevin D. Ballard, Michael A. Deal, Lisa C. Tagariello, Jenna M. Karrow, Gabrielle A. Volk, Adam Meisler, Ian D. Connors and Rachael E. Mott

. PubMed ID: 3989240 doi:10.1093/geronj/40.3.281 10.1093/geronj/40.3.281 3989240 21. Meijer EP , Goris AH , van Dongen JL , Bast A , Westerterp KR . Exercise-induced oxidative stress in older adults as a function of habitual activity level . J Am Geriatr Soc . 2002 ; 50 ( 2 ): 349 – 353

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Susan Paudel, Narayan Subedi and Suresh Mehata

Background:

This study was carried out to assess physical activity level and identify associated factors among higher secondary school students in Banke district, Nepal.

Methods:

A school-based, cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted among 405 students studying in grades 11 and 12 in 7 higher secondary schools selected randomly. A self-administered questionnaire based on the International Physical Activity Questionnaire was used to measure physical activity level.

Results:

Only 5% of students were found to be inactive, and domestic and transport-related activities were major contributors to total physical activity score. No significant difference existed for total physical activity and domain-specific and activity-specific scores across different age groups when males and females were tested separately. Being male (P = .046), lower economic status (P = .026), living at a distance of less than 30 minutes (P = .007), walking/cycling to school (P < .001), and studying in government school (P < .001) were associated with increased physical activity scores on multivariate logistic regression analysis.

Conclusion:

Routine activities such as transport and household chores contributed greatly to total physical activity among students. This study highlights the need for physical activity promotion interventions at school addressing the associated factors and a need for greater focus on leisure-time physical activities.

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Sheila A. Dugan, Susan A. Everson-Rose, Kelly Karavolos, Barbara Sternfeld, Deidre Wesley and Lynda H. Powell

Background:

This study was done to determine whether physical activity at baseline is independently associated with musculoskeletal pain and fulfilling one’s physical role over 3 subsequent years.

Methods:

Our research involved a 3-year longitudinal study of over 2400 community-dwelling, midlife women from the Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation (SWAN). Measurements included baseline physical activity using the Kaiser Permanente Health Plan Activity Survey and SF-36 role-physical and bodily pain indices at each of 3 annual follow-up visits.

Results:

Each 1-point increase on the physical activity score was associated with a 7% greater likelihood of a high role-physical score (95% CI = 1.02– 1.13) and a 10% greater likelihood of a low bodily pain score (95% CI = 1.04–1.17) after adjusting for age, race, menopausal status, educational level, body mass index, depressive symptoms, smoking, and chronic medical conditions. The association between physical activity level and role-physical score was eliminated in the fully adjusted model after adjustment for pain level in post hoc analysis [OR = 1.04 (95% CI = 0.98–1.09)].

Conclusion:

This study demonstrates that women who are more physically active at midlife experience less bodily pain over time regardless of menopausal status, sociodemographics, and medical conditions. Higher physical activity level positively impacts fulfilling one’s physical role; however, this is mediated by pain level.

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Christina A. Taylor and Joonkoo Yun

This study examined the psychometric properties of the System for Observing Fitness Instruction Time (SOFIT) and the Children’s Activity Rating Scale (CARS) for use with children with mental retardation (MR). Eleven children with MR were videotaped while participating in a university-based community outreach program. Actiwatch accelerometers were used as the criterion measure. Results indicated that SOFIT and CARS both demonstrated adequate levels of generalizability (ϕ= 0.98 and 0.75), but a low concurrent validity coefficient for SOFIT (r = .10) and a moderate level of validity coefficient for CARS (r = .61) were observed. CARS demonstrates stronger validity evidence than SOFIT, but it is important to have sufficient rater training before using CARS for measuring physical activity level of children with MR.