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Julia Walsh and Fraser Carson

Learning about coaching and learning to be a coach is complex and messy. Sport coaching is a multi-faceted activity involving the application and integration of different forms of knowledge and skills in a dynamic ill-defined context ( Jones & Standage, 2006 ). It is even more complicated for those

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Kurtis Pankow, Amber D. Mosewich and Nicholas L. Holt

Coach education programs, and the study of coaching development, tend to focus on the acquisition of technical and tactical knowledge ( Erickson, Bruner, MacDonald, & Côté, 2008 ; Lemyre, Trudel, & Durand-Bush, 2007 ) rather than how coaches learn to lead athletes. Leadership requires more than

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Sebastian Altfeld, Paul Schaffran, Jens Kleinert and Michael Kellmann

‘I feel very exhausted from the season’, ‘It’s hard for me to go to the practice because I feel so empty’ or ‘I don’t know what’s going on. I don’t reach my usual performance even though I try it again and again’. These statements stem from coaches in therapeutic treatment describing themselves as

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Laurie B. Patterson, Susan H. Backhouse and Sergio Lara-Bercial

officials, medical practitioners and coaches has long been recognised ( Council of Europe’s Anti-Doping Convention, 1989 ). This was not surprising considering the evidence that emerged in the 1980s implicating athlete support personnel in doping practices. Coaches were specifically highlighted in these

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Blake Bennett and Glenn Fyall

Cassidy, Jones, and Potrac ( 2016 ) suggested that professional knowledge , or technical and tactical knowledge, is still the dominant view of sport coaching and privileges the bioscientific, product-oriented discourse. Simply, coaches may be viewed as ‘mere technicians’ whose mechanistic role is

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Tammy Sheehy, Sam Zizzi, Kristen Dieffenbach and Lee-Ann Sharp

In the field of applied sport psychology, sport psychology consultants (SPCs) help their clients enhance the process of performance, holistic well-being, and social functioning (Association for Applied Sport Psychology, [ AASP], 2016 ). Although coaches are discussed as client recipients in a

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Sofie Morbée, Maarten Vansteenkiste, Nathalie Aelterman and Leen Haerens

my players played well or whether I noticed some progress. —Richard, 32 years old, a youth football coach This quote comes from a coach who participated in an intervention on motivating coaching ( Reynders et al., 2019 ) and illustrates that contextual pressures on coaches can be conveyed in subtle

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Diane M. Culver, Penny Werthner and Pierre Trudel

The focus of this paper is the Canadian National Coaching Certification Program (NCCP), a large-scale formal coach education programme. Beginning in the early 2000s, revisions to the programme have moved the NCCP from an instructor-centred to a learner-centred programme. Through an examination of

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Robert T. Pearson, Timothy Baghurst and Mwarumba Mwavita

Coaches of intercollegiate athletic teams may be the most visible members of a college or university community and often face job performance demands not found in other professions ( Overton, 2005 ; Schroeder, 2010 ). For example, they may serve as an athlete’s mentor, substitute parent

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Pierre Lepage, Gordon A. Bloom and William R. Falcão

unavailable in other social circles ( Goodwin, Lieberman, Johnston, & Leo, 2011 ; Shapiro & Martin, 2010 ). The acquisition of these benefits can be facilitated by the presence of trained and skilled coaches, particularly in youth parasport ( Falcão, Bloom, & Gilbert, 2012 ; Goodwin et al., 2011 ; Smith