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Diane M. Culver, Erin Kraft, Cari Din and Isabelle Cayer

coaching and other leadership roles in sport. Moreover, there continues to be minimal literature examining the implementation and evaluation of initiatives for women in sport leadership. The Alberta Women in Sport Leadership Impact Program (AWiSL) aims to increase gender equity and leadership diversity in

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Adam J. White, Stefan Robinson, Eric Anderson, Rachael Bullingham, Allyson Pollock and Ryan Scoats

leadership: The RFU effectively denies young people’s voice and representation, which in this instance hides the fact that children and young people are concerned with the physical harms of playing rugby. This research contributes to the current literature on diversity and inclusion within sporting

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Susan Carter

equality, acceptance of diversity, intolerance of harassment and abuse, and fairness with transgender athletes. She co-founded the evidence-based advocacy group on the international stage known as Women Sport International (WSI). Professor Barbara Drinkwater As a physiologist, Barbara has had a major

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Lynley Ingerson and Michael L. Naraine

market; they had long been branded (externally) as the industry leader. File 3: Sex, Diversity, and the Workplace Patrick was horrified with the records kept in file 3. Much of the reporting in this file were allegations which would cause the organization great concern if challenged through the legal

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Carlos Capella-Peris, Jesús Gil-Gómez and Òscar Chiva-Bartoll

children with motor functional diversity. This condition was due to autism spectrum disorder, down syndrome, cerebral palsy, attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder, and Rett’s syndrome. The term motor functional diversity is an umbrella concept used to describe any alteration of motor behavior

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Fiona Pelly and Susie Parker Simmons

particularly in less developed countries. Historically, the food program at the Olympic Games has evolved considerably since the advent of a unified menu in 1972 ( Pelly et al., 2011 ), but it appears that the capacity to cater for the expanding cultural and sporting diversity and the growing evidence around

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Earl Smith and Angela Hattery

There have been many discussions about diversity and the value that it brings to the workplace (Ely & Thomas, 2001). Although sport has been deemed a model of diversity, where people of different races and ethnicities comingle as participants and spectators, there is a serious disconnect between perceptions of this diversity and the reality that defines the lack of racial diversity in the management (i.e., coaching and leadership) of sport. The purpose of this essay is to provide an exploration and analysis of the varied ways in which race may influence sport management experiences and opportunities. We frame this analysis through race relation theory, symbolic racism theory, social distance theory, and the concepts of segregation and power. The inferences and implications of our essay are centered on the undercurrent of the status of African American men in sport leadership, who are severely under-represented despite their prominent contribution to the financial vitality of the sport industry as players. The essay concludes with several policies and practices for improving racial diversity in sport management.

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Jennifer Bruening, Rhema D. Fuller, Raymond J. Cotrufo, Rachel M. Madsen, Justin Evanovich and Devon E. Wilson-Hill

Allport’s (1954) intergroup contact hypothesis states that interactions with members of an out-group, particularly of a different racial and/or ethnic group, are effective in changing attitudes about diversity (Allport, 1954; Pettigrew, 1998). In this study, the intergroup contact hypothesis was applied to the design of a sport management course. The classroom component focused the role of sport in education, health, and leadership development, and the application was structured sport and physical activity programming with school-age children at several urban sites. Data were gathered from 91 college students over 3 years about course-related experiences and how the students’ backgrounds influenced their social identities and understanding of out-group members. Results showed that intergroup contact effectively assisted in developing understanding and cooperation and reducing negative attitudes between groups. The participants received diversity education, via intergroup contact, both inside and outside the classroom, which will potentially equip them to take proactive strategies when managing organizational diversity in the sport industry.

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Luis Columna, John T. Foley and Rebecca K. Lytle

The purpose of this study was to analyze both male and female physical education teacher attitudes toward cultural pluralism and diversity. Participants (N = 433) were adapted physical education specialists, physical education generalists, and teacher candidates. The research method was a descriptive cross-sectional survey (Fraenkel & Wallen, 1990). Data were collected using a modified version of the Pluralism and Diversity Attitude Assessment survey (Stanley, 1997). Mann-Whitney U tests showed no significant differences in attitude scores between teachers and teacher candidates. However, women’s attitude scores were significantly higher than men’s. Further Friedman’s ANOVA test showed statistical differences on the survey’s constructs for gender and professional status. Post hoc analysis indicated that the groups scored significantly higher on the construct, Value Cultural Pluralism than Implement Cultural Pluralism. This means teachers generally valued cultural diversity, but struggled to implement culturally responsive pedagogy. In conclusion, physical educators may need better preparation to ensure cultural competence.

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Bert Hayslip Jr., Daniel Weigand, Robert Weinberg, Peggy Richardson and Allen Jackson

The present investigation reports on the reliability and validity of several scales derived from the Health Belief Model (HBM). Both their internal consistency and their ability to predict self-reported sport and physical activity participation among younger and older adults are examined. As an exploratory endeavor, new, internally consistent scales were developed to assess several HBM factors. Results of age-group comparisons as well as comparisons across levels of diversity in several types of self-reported physical activity suggest that the newly developed measures differentiate between individuals on the basis of age and degrees of diversity in activity.