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Volker Cihlar and Sonia Lippke

lifestyle factor is physical activity, which will therefore be investigated in the current study. Regular physical activity supports healthy aging in the sense that it helps individuals to remain healthy or to improve their health. Physical activity reduces the risk for most of the common causes of death

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Christopher A. Bailey, Maxana Weiss and Julie N. Côté

Healthy aging has been linked to alterations in the structures and physiology of the neuromuscular system. With age, motor unit (MU) remodeling becomes compromised ( Gordon, Hegedus, & Tam, 2004 ; Power, Dalton, & Rice, 2013 ), leading to fewer total MUs that fire at lower frequencies, with higher

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Leah E. Robinson

) conduct interdisciplinary research on issues related to healthy aging; (b) provide professional training of students and health care practitioners working with older adults in a variety of settings; (c) offer a variety of health, psychological, and functional assessments; (d) conduct a range of community

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Annette J. Raynor, Fiona Iredale, Robert Crowther, Jane White and Julie Dare

Contemporary healthy aging strategies focus on supporting individuals to “age in place,” by maintaining their level of independence for as long as possible. Key to this is encouraging older people to be physically active, given that physical activity and exercise are associated with improved

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Julien Louis, Fabrice Vercruyssen, Olivier Dupuy and Thierry Bernard

.e., training, diet, sleep) and their physical capacities also represents a valuable resource to further the understanding of the biological aging process (i.e., not influenced by environmental factors, such as sedentariness) and strategies for healthy aging ( Lazarus & Harridge, 2017 ; Louis, Hausswirth, Easthope

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Dereck L. Salisbury and Fang Yu

ideomotor apraxia in persons with AD at all stages of the disease ( Sheridan & Hausdorff, 2007 ). In particular, persons with AD have been shown to have shorter step length, slower gait speed and stepping frequency, greater step-to-step variability, and larger sway relative to healthy, age-matched older

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Harsh H. Buddhadev, Daniel L. Crisafulli, David N. Suprak and Jun G. San Juan

OA compared with healthy controls. We hypothesize that (1) individuals with knee OA would demonstrate interlimb asymmetry in crank power output, generating greater power with their less affected compared with their more affected leg. We also hypothesize that individuals in the healthy age- and sex

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Kelsie M. Full, Eileen Johnson, Michelle Takemoto, Sheri J. Hartman, Jacqueline Kerr, Loki Natarajan, Ruth E. Patterson and Dorothy D. Sears

critical to develop lifestyle treatment guidelines that help this population minimize the risk of cancer recurrence. However, for survivors, public health efforts should not only be focused on staying cancer free, but also on healthy aging, free of all chronic conditions. In this study, multiple biomarkers

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Hsin-Yen Yen and Hsuan Hsu

( Gallè et al., 2017 ). A healthy lifestyle can help older adults preserve their abilities and functionality for healthy aging, especially in terms of healthy eating and active living (HEAL; Cheadle et al., 2018 ). HEAL is a beneficial strategy for preventing NCDs, prolonging older adults’ life

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Simone Pettigrew, Elissa Burton, Kaela Farrier, Anne-Marie Hill, Liz Bainbridge, Gill Lewin, Phil Airey and Keith Hill

Worldwide, the facilitation of healthy aging is a policy priority in an attempt to manage the substantial growth in health system costs forecast to result from population aging ( World Health Organization, 2015 ). Physical activity is critical to healthy aging, and strength training is a