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Meghan K. Edwards and Paul D. Loprinzi

]=field_topic_area%3A3504 . Accessed January 1, 2016. 2. Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Committee Report, 2008 . 2008 . https://health.gov/paguidelines/report/ . Accessed January 3, 2016. 3. Pollock ML , Franklin BA , Balady GJ , et al . AHA Science Advisory. Resistance exercise in

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Lisa Price, Katrina Wyatt, Jenny Lloyd, Charles Abraham, Siobhan Creanor, Sarah Dean and Melvyn Hillsdon

Behav Nutr Phys Act, 2015 ; 12 : 113 . PubMed ID: 26377803 doi:10.1186/s12966-015-0274-5 10.1186/s12966-015-0274-5 9. Mooses K , Maestu J , Riso EM , et al . Different methods yielded two-fold difference in compliance with physical activity guidelines on school days . PLoS ONE . 2016

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Jeremy A. Steeves, Scott A. Conger, Joe R. Mitrzyk, Trevor A. Perry, Elise Flanagan, Alecia K. Fox, Trystan Weisinger and Alexander H.K. Montoye

In addition to accumulating at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity or 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity aerobic activity per week, the 2018 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans recommend that adults perform muscle-strengthening activities that engage all major muscle groups at least two

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Mohamed Kanu, Elizabeth Baker and Ross C. Brownson

Objective:

This study tested associations between church-based instrumental and informational social support and meeting physical activity guidelines.

Methods:

Cross-sectional data were analyzed for 1625 rural residents using logistic regression.

Results:

Associations were found between instrumental social support and performing some amount of physical activity but not between the 2 forms of support and meeting physical activity guidelines.

Conclusion:

Instrumental social support might help initiation of physical activity. Given that 54.1% of US adults get no leisure-time physical activity at the recommended minimum level, instrumental social support might be important in considering physical activity programs.

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Alexander H.K. Montoye, Scott A. Conger, Joe R. Mitrzyk, Colby Beach, Alecia K. Fox and Jeremy A. Steeves

activity in the United States measured by accelerometer . Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 40 ( 1 ), 181 – 188 . PubMed ID: 18091006 doi:10.1249/mss.0b013e31815a51b3 10.1249/mss.0b013e31815a51b3 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services . ( 2018 ). Physical Activity Guidelines for

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Paul D. Loprinzi and Chelsea Joyner

Objective:

To examine the association of source of emotional- and financial-related social support and size of social support network on physical activity behavior among older adults.

Methods:

Data from the 1999–2006 NHANES were used (N = 5616; 60 to 85 yrs). Physical activity and emotional- and financial-related social support were assessed via self-report.

Results:

Older adults with perceived having emotional social support had a 41% increased odds of meeting physical activity guidelines (OR = 1.41; 95% CI: 1.01–1.97). The only specific sources of social support that were associated with meeting physical activity guidelines was friend emotional support (OR = 1.19; 95% CI: 1.01–1.41) and financial support (OR = 1.28; 95% CI: 1.09–1.49). With regard to size of social support network, a dose-response relationship was observed. Compared with those with 0 close friends, those with 1 to 2, 3 to 4, 5, and 6+ close friends, respectively, had a 1.70-, 2.38-, 2.57-, and 2.71-fold increased odds of meeting physical activity guidelines. There was some evidence of gender- and age-specific associations between social support and physical activity.

Conclusions:

Emotional- and financial-related social support and size of social support network are associated with higher odds of meeting physical activity guidelines among older adults.

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Jacob S. Tucker, Scott Martin, Allen W. Jackson, James R. Morrow Jr., Christy A. Greenleaf and Trent A. Petrie

Purpose:

To investigate the relations between sedentary behaviors and health-related physical fitness and physical activity in middle school boys and girls.

Methods:

Students (n = 1515) in grades 6–8 completed the Youth Risk Behavior Survey sedentary behavior questions, the FITNESSGRAM physical fitness items, and FITNESSGRAM physical activity self-report questions.

Results:

When students reported ≤ 2 hours per day of sedentary behaviors, their odds of achieving the FITNESSGRAM Healthy Fitness Zone for aerobic capacity, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility, and body composition increased. Similarly, the odds of achieving physical activity guidelines for children increased when students reported ≤ 2 hours per day of sedentary behaviors.

Conclusions:

Results illustrate the importance of keeping sedentary behaviors to ≤ 2 hours per day in middle school children, thus increasing the odds that the student will achieve sufficient health-related fitness benefits and be more likely to achieve the national physical activity guidelines.

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Clare Stevinson, Katia Tonkin, Valerie Capstick, Alexandra Schepansky, Aliya B. Ladha, Jeffrey K. Vallance, Wylam Faught, Helen Steed and Kerry S. Courneya

Background:

Regular physical activity is associated with quality of life and other health-related outcomes in ovarian cancer survivors, but participation rates are low. This study investigated the determinants of physical activity in ovarian cancer survivors.

Methods:

A population-based, cross-sectional, mailed survey of ovarian cancer survivors in Alberta, Canada, was conducted. Measures included self-reported physical activity, medical and demographic factors, and social-cognitive variables from the theory of planned behavior (TPB).

Results:

A total of 359 women participated (51.4% response rate), of whom 112 (31.1%) were meeting physical activity guidelines. Variables associated with meeting guidelines were younger age, higher education and income, being employed, lower body-mass index, absence of arthritis, longer time since diagnosis, earlier disease stage, and being disease free. Analysis of the TPB variables indicated that 36% of the variance in physical activity guidelines was explained, with intention being the sole independent correlate (β = .56; P < .001).

Conclusion:

Various demographic and medical factors can help identify ovarian cancer survivors at risk for physical inactivity. Interventions should attempt to increase physical activity intentions in this population by focusing on instrumental and affective attitudes, as well as perceptions of control.

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Adilson Marques, João Martins, Hugo Sarmento, Leonardo Rocha and Francisco Carreiro da Costa

Background:

Knowledge is required for people to make health decisions. It can be conjectured that knowledge of physical activity recommended levels can be a step to behavior change. This study examined the knowledge of physical activity guidelines of adolescents who were completing the secondary school.

Methods:

A survey was conducted with 2718 students (1613 girls), aged 16 to 18 years (Mean = 17.2 ± 0.2 years). Gender and age were self-reported and socioeconomic status was calculated based on parental occupation. Students were asked about frequency, duration, and intensity of physical activity to achieve the recommended level. Chi-square was applied to the results.

Results:

16.2% reported that physical activity should be practiced daily. For the duration component of the recommendation, 43.5% identified correctly that the minimum recommended is 60 min/day. The intensity component was correctly answered by 62.7%. Considering all the components of the recommendation, only 3.6% of the students were able to identify correctly the physical activity recommendation, with no differences between genders or among socioeconomic status.

Conclusions:

These results highlight the need for an effective communication strategy for disseminating the message to ensure that young people are aware of, and understand the physical activity guidelines.

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Robert H. DuRant and Albert C. Hergenroeder

During the 1993 International Consensus Conference on Physical Activity Guidelines for Adolescents, specific recommendations were made concerning the levels and types of physical activity in which adolescents should be encouraged to engage. This paper addresses the promotion of these guidelines by primary health care providers. Based on social cognitive theory, principles for promoting changes in health behaviors are described. Using the GAPS model (gather information, assess further, problem identification, and self-efficacy and solving barriers), methods of implementing these principles in a physician’s office are presented. Promoting physical activity in other health care settings and situations is also discussed. Primary health care providers can be effective promoters of physical activity to their adolescent patients.