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Brian J. Foster and Graig M. Chow

into subjective ( Bradburn, 1969 ), psychological ( Ryff, 1989 ), and social ( Keyes, 1998 ) factors. Subjective well-being is one’s degree of happiness and life satisfaction, with emphasis on feelings and emotions ( Ryan & Deci, 2001 ). In contrast, psychological well-being is considered more

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INTERNATIONAL SPORT COACHING JOURNAL

DIGEST VOLUME 6, ISSUE #1

Journal of Sport Science and Coaching , 13 (6), 815-827. doi: 10.1177/1747954118787949 This study investigated the relationships between the coaching climate, young people’s perceived life skills development within sport, and their psychological well-being. British youth sport participants ( N  = 326, M

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Kylie McNeill, Natalie Durand-Bush and Pierre-Nicolas Lemyre

-being, defined as a combination of emotional, social, and psychological well-being. As such, emotional well-being (i.e., feeling happy, satisfied, and interested in life) taps into hedonic qualities of well-being, while social (e.g., experiencing social acceptance) and psychological (e.g., having purpose in life

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Anass Arrogi, Astrid Schotte, An Bogaerts, Filip Boen and Jan Seghers

’s RPE (6–20) 13.8 (1.7) 13.9 (1.7) 13.5 (1.7) 0.002 .15 Well-being, mean (SD)  Physical well-being 4.1 (0.9) 4.1 (0.9) 4.3 (1.0) 0.322 .09  Psychological well-being 5.3 (0.7) 5.3 (0.7) 5.3 (0.8) 0.094 .88 Habitual physical activity, mean (SD)  Daily step count, steps/d 9565.6 (3152.8) 9501.4 (3088

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Kylie McNeill, Natalie Durand-Bush and Pierre-Nicolas Lemyre

subjective well-being (i.e., emotional, social, and psychological well-being; Keyes, 2002 ). The data were also coded inductively to capture new categories (e.g., work-life balance, role of facilitator) that emerged from the data ( Hseih & Shannon, 2005 ). To facilitate data coding, the first author

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Anna Sverdlik, Robert J. Vallerand, Ariane St-Louis, Michael Sam Tion and Geneviève Porlier

people placing more emphasis on the present and others on the past or on the future. They suggested that people’s preference for a temporal perspective, or their individual temporal pattern, could have a differential influence on their psychological well-being. Much of the research based on this

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Kelly P. Arbour-Nicitopoulos, Celina Shirazipour and Krystn Orr

physical activity interventions (both lifestyle physical activity and exercise) for improving physical functioning, psychological well-being, and/or physical activity participation in persons with disabilities. One of the strengths highlighted in this line of research is its diverse use of intervention

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Justine J. Reel and Emily Crouch

bravely tell their stories. They paint a picture of how it is to be powerless in an environment that values athletic success or psychological well-being of a child, adolescent, or young adult. Other manuscripts highlight best practices for approaching athletes who have faced the unspeakable and are trying

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Kim Gammage, Rachel Arnold, Lori Dithurbide, Alison Ede, Karl Erickson, Blair Evans, Larkin Lamarche, Sean Locke, Eric Martin and Kathleen Wilson

-solving, and flexibility. Participants completed online measures of subjective well-being, psychological well-being, social well-being, physical health, mindfulness, and experiential avoidance/acceptance before and after the 8-week intervention. Results showed medium-to-large effect sizes for the mindfulness

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Theresa E. Gildner, J. Josh Snodgrass, Clare Evans and Paul Kowal

included three commonly used measures of subjective well-being: (a) subjective QOL, (b) self-rated happiness, and (c) reported mood ( Diener et al., 2003 ). These generally relate to two important aspects of psychological well-being: evaluative well-being (or life satisfaction) and hedonic well