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Maria Hagstromer, Barbara E. Ainsworth, Pekka Oja and Michael Sjostrom

Background:

The aim of this study was to compare physical activity components in the long, self-administrated version of IPAQ with an accelerometer in a population sample.

Methods:

In total 980 subjects (18-65 years) wore an accelerometer (Actigraph) for 7 consecutive days and thereafter filled in the IPAQ. Measures of total physical activity, time spent in moderate and in vigorous activity as well as time spent sitting as assessed by the IPAQ and the Actigraph were compared.

Results:

The results showed significant low to moderate correlations (Rs = 0.07−0.36) between the 2 instruments and significantly (P < .001) higher values for sitting and vigorous intensity physical activity from the IPAQ compared with the Actigraph. The higher the values reported by the IPAQ the bigger differences were seen between the instruments. Comparison between the tertiles of total physical activity by the 2 instruments showed significant overall association with consistent agreement in the low and the high tertiles.

Conclusion:

The long form of IPAQ is a valid measure of physical activity in population research. However, the IPAQ likely overestimates actual physical activity as shown by its limited ability to classify adults into low and high categories of physical activity based on accelerometer data.

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Ian Rollo, Franco M. Impellizzeri, Matteo Zago and F. Marcello Iaia

The physical-performance profiles of subelite male footballers were monitored during 6 wk of a competitive season. The same squad of players played either 1 (1G, n = 15) or 2 (2G, n = 15) competitive matches per week. On weeks 0, 3, and 6, 48 h postmatch, players completed countermovement jump (CMJ), 10- and 20-m sprints, the Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test (YYIRT), and the Recovery-Stress Questionnaire. Both groups undertook 2 weekly training sessions. The 2G showed after 6 wk lower YYIRT (–11% to 3%, 90% CI –15.8% to –6.8%; P < .001) and CMJ performances (–18.7%, –21.6 to –15.9%; P = .007) and higher 10-m (4.4%, 1.8–6.9%; P = .007) and 20-m sprints values (4.7%, 2.9% to 6.4%; P < .001). No differences were found at 3 wk (.06 < P < .99). No changes over time (.169 < P < .611) and no differences time × group interactions (.370 < P < .550) were found for stress, recovery, and the Stress Recovery Index. In conclusion players’ ability to sprint, jump, and perform repeated intense exercise was impaired when playing 2 competitive matches a week over 6 wk.

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Abigail L. Gilbert, Jungwha Lee, Madeleine Ma, Pamela A. Semanik, Loretta DiPietro, Dorothy D. Dunlop and Rowland W. Chang

Background:

Sedentary behavior is associated with increased risk of functional decline and disability. Individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) spend more time sedentary than healthy adults. Self-reported assessment of sedentary behavior has not been well-developed in this patient population.

Methods:

172 adults with RA wore an accelerometer for 7 days and completed a modified version of the Yale Physical Activity Survey (YPAS). YPAS-derived sedentary estimates included 1) daily sitting categories (<3, 3 to 6, 6 to 8, >8 hours/day), 2) continuous daily sedentary time calculated by subtracting hours spent sleeping or in physical activity from a 24-hour day, and 3) rank order of YPAS-derived continuous daily sedentary time. Each estimate was compared with objective accelerometer-derived sedentary time using linear regression and Bland-Altman analysis.

Results:

A significant relationship was observed between accelerometer-derived sedentary time and all 3 estimates. Bland-Altman plot demonstrated systematic bias, however Bland-Altman plot of rank-order demonstrated that the ranked YPAS-derived continuous estimate was an unbiased predictor of ranked accelerometer sedentary time though limits of agreement were wide.

Conclusions:

This patient-reported approach using the YPAS shows promise to be a useful tool to identify the most sedentary patients. Providing a practical and accurate tool may increase the frequency sedentary behavior is assessed by clinicians.

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Natalie Cook and Tamerah N. Hunt

behavior. 9 Furthermore, the theory of planned behavior also considers personal and social influences on a person’s behavior. 9 According to the theory of planned behavior, a person’s intention to perform a behavior can be predicted from the person’s attitude, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral

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Elske Stolte, Marijke Hopman-Rock, Marja J. Aartsen, Theo G. van Tilburg and Astrid Chorus

the most important determinant of behavior ( Ajzen, 1991 , 2002 ). Intention in turn is predicted by subjective norm (the perceived social pressure to perform or not perform the behavior), attitude (the degree to which a person has a favorable or unfavorable evaluation or appraisal of the behavior

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Cecilie Thøgersen-Ntoumani, Anthony Papathomas, Jonathan Foster, Eleanor Quested and Nikos Ntoumanis

symptoms of the disease ( Leifer, 2003 ). One group of older adults that has been described as being at increased risk of dementia comprises individuals who experience age-related subjective memory complaints ( Mitchell, Beaumont, Ferguson, Yadegarfar, & Stubbs, 2014 ). In this study, we explored the views

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Cole McClean, Michael A. Odio and Shannon Kerwin

career motivation, and potential decreases in student self-confidence (e.g., subjective well-being); all are important factors for individuals attempting to begin their careers. One approach to understanding the complexity of the internship experience is to explore the events that occur within the

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Derek M.D. Silva, Roy Bower and William Cipolli III

between objective measurements of athletes and the subjective assessment of those athletes by scouts. One would expect that both objective and subjective assessments of an athlete’s body are predictors of scouts’ overall evaluation. One would also expect that subjective assessments of athlete’s bodies are