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Erika Rees-Punia, Charles E. Matthews, Ellen M. Evans, Sarah K. Keadle, Rebecca L. Anderson, Jennifer L. Gay, Michael D. Schmidt, Susan M. Gapstur and Alpa V. Patel

feasible and cost-effective option for large-scale epidemiologic studies ( Haskell, 2012 ; Masse & de Niet, 2012 ; Sallis & Saelens, 2000 ). Given these issues, it is important to conduct validity studies of PA surveys to understand how measurement error may affect results of future association studies

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Jo Doyle and Gaynor Parfitt

This study attempted to assess the construct validity of the performance profile technique (Butler, 1989) within elite track and field athletics. Twelve elite (senior international honors) athletes (5 male, 7 female: mean age = 21.2, SD = 1.81) completed their profile on five occasions across winter training and the indoor season. Support for the construct validity of the profile was identified by a reduction in profile areas of perceived need (F (4, 44) = 11.77, p < .05) which was congruent with the observed increase in performance (F (4, 44) = 26.30, p < .05) as athletes progressed from winter training to the peak of the competitive indoor season. Trend analyses also identified that areas of perceived need in profile constructs, which were classified as most important to performance, showed a greater and more rapid reduction across the five occasions compared to the least important constructs. However, the results raise some concern over the usefulness of the profile for detecting subtle but important changes in performance and perceived need.

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Serkan Usgu, Günseli Usgu, Fatma Uygur and Yavuz Yakut

) assess athletic injuries or functional limitations and successfully identify foot- and ankle-related impairments. 12 The FAAM is a reliable and valid instrument used to measure physical function 13 in sport and high-intensity daily living activities. 14 Notably, the sport subscale of the FAAM

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Jing Dong Liu and Pak-kwong Chung

The current study presents the development process and initial validation of a measure designed for assessing psychological needs thwarting (frustration) in a secondary school physical education context (Psychological Needs Thwarting Scale in Physical Education, PNTSPE). Secondary school students (grades 7–9) from Hong Kong (N = 1258) were invited to participate in three studies. In Study 1, item generation and initial content validity of the PNTSPE were achieved. In Study 2, the factorial structure of the measure was tested using exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. Internal consistency reliabilities of the subscales were also examined. In Study 3, the reliability and validity of the scores derived from the PNTSPE were further examined in an independent sample. Overall, the findings from the three studies provided initial psychometric evidence for the PNTSPE and suggested that the PNTSPE could be used as a valid and reliable measure to assess Hong Kong secondary school students’ psychological needs thwarting in physical education.

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Hidde P. van der Ploeg, Kitty R.M. Streppel, Allard J. van der Beek, Luc H.V. van der Woude, Miriam Vollenbroek-Hutten and Willem van Mechelen

Background:

The objective was to determine the test-retest reliability and criterion validity of the Physical Activity Scale for Individuals with Physical Disabilities (PASIPD).

Methods:

Forty-five non-wheelchair dependent subjects were recruited from three Dutch rehabilitation centers. Subjects’ diagnoses were: stroke, spinal cord injury, whiplash, and neurological-, orthopedic- or back disorders. The PASIPD is a 7-d recall physical activity questionnaire that was completed twice, 1 wk apart. During this week, physical activity was also measured with an Actigraph accelerometer.

Results:

The test-retest reliability Spearman correlation of the PASIPD was 0.77. The criterion validity Spearman correlation was 0.30 when compared to the accelerometer.

Conclusions:

The PASIPD had test-retest reliability and criterion validity that is comparable to well established self-report physical activity questionnaires from the general population.

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Carlos Balsalobre-Fernández, Hovannes Agopyan and Jean-Benoit Morin

based on opto-electronic devices and accelerometers. 11 , 13 , 14 Among these, the Optojump Next (Microgate, Bolzano, Italy) is probably the most widely used because of its high degree of validity and reliability compared with force platforms. 15 , 16 Moreover, contact and aerial times can be used

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Jason Lake, Peter Mundy, Paul Comfort, John J. McMahon, Timothy J. Suchomel and Patrick Carden

dual-plate system yields a typical measurement range upper limit of 8.8 kN with protection up to 13.2 kN. Although it appears that this portable force plate system may provide a realistic alternative to established systems, nothing is known about its reliability and concurrent validity. Currently, a 1

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Jennifer J. Sherwood, Cathy Inouye, Shannon L. Webb and Jenny O

who are not yet disabled or those with early disability at risk of progression are most likely to benefit from exercise intervention. It is in this population that reliable, valid, and age-appropriate tools are needed to monitor lower limb muscular power. Currently, community exercise programs screen

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Darren Steeves, Leo J. Thornley, Joshua A. Goreham, Matthew J. Jordan, Scott C. Landry and Jonathon R. Fowles

tests was investigated to determine their utility in a kayak-specific testing program. Methods Participants The study consisted of a reliability segment followed by a validity segment. Highly trained male and female kayakers were recruited for both segments of this investigation. All participants were

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Nora E. Miller, Scott J. Strath, Ann M. Swartz and Susan E. Cashin

This study examined the predictive validity of accelerometers (ACC) to estimate physical activity intensity (PAI) across age and differences in intensity predictions when expressed in relative and absolute PAI terms. Ninety adults categorized into 3 age groups (20–29, 40–49, and 60–69 yr) completed a treadmill calibration study with simultaneous ACC (7164 Actigraph) and oxygen-consumption assessment. Results revealed strong linear relations between ACC output and measured PAI (R 2 = .62–.89) across age and similar ACC cut-point ranges across age delineating absolute PAI ranges compared with previous findings. Comparing measured metabolic equivalents (METs) with estimated METs derived from previously published regression equations revealed that age did not affect predictive validity of ACC estimates of absolute PAI. Comparing ACC output expressed in relative vs. absolute terms across age revealed substantial differences in PAI ACC count ranges. Further work is warranted to increase the applicability of ACC use relative to PAI differences associated with physiological changes with age.