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Yuri Hosokawa, William M. Adams and Douglas J. Casa

Context: It is unknown how valid esophageal, rectal, and gastrointestinal temperatures (TES, TRE, and TGI) compare after exercise-induced hyperthermia under different hydration states. Objective: To examine the differences between TES, TRE, and TGI during passive rest following exercise-induced hyperthermia under 2 different hydration states: euhydrated (EU) and hypohydrated (HY). Design: Randomized crossover design. Setting: Controlled laboratory setting. Participants: 9 recreationally active male participants (mean ± SD age 24 ± 4 y, height 177.3 ± 9.9 cm, body mass 76.7 ± 11.6 kg, body fat 14.7% ± 5.8%). Intervention: Participants completed 2 trials (EU and HY) consisting of a bout of treadmill exercise (a 10-min walk at 4.8-7.2 km/h at a 5% grade followed by a 20-min jog at 8.0-12.1 km/h at a 1% grade) in a hot environment (ambient temperature 39.3 ± 1.0°C, relative humidity 37.6% ± 6.0%, wet bulb globe temperature 31.3 ± 1.5°C) followed by passive rest. Main Outcome Measures: Root-mean-squared difference (RMSD) was used to compare the variance of temperature readings at corresponding time points for TRE vs TGI, TRE vs TES, and TGI vs TES in EU and HY. RMSD values were compared using 3-way repeated-measures ANOVA. Post hoc analysis of significant main effects was done using Tukey honestly significant difference with significance set at P < .05. Results: RMSD values (°C) for all device comparisons were significantly different in EU (TRE-TGI, 0.11 ± 0.12; TRE-TES, 1.58 ± 1.01; TGI-TES, 2.04 ± 1.19) than HY (TRE-TGI, 0.22 ± 0.28; TRE-TES, 1.27 ± 0.61; TGI-TES, 1.16 ± 0.76) (P < .01). Across the 45-min bout of passive rest, there were no differences in TRE, TGI, and TES between EU and HY trials (P = .468). Conclusions: During passive rest after exercise in the heat, TRE and TGI were in good agreement when tracking body temperature, with a better agreement appearing in those maintaining a state of euhydration versus those who became hypohydrated during exercise; however, this small difference does not appear to be of clinical significance. The large differences were observed when comparing TGI and TRE with TES.

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Jason Lake, Peter Mundy, Paul Comfort, John J. McMahon, Timothy J. Suchomel and Patrick Carden

dual-plate system yields a typical measurement range upper limit of 8.8 kN with protection up to 13.2 kN. Although it appears that this portable force plate system may provide a realistic alternative to established systems, nothing is known about its reliability and concurrent validity. Currently, a 1

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Carlos Balsalobre-Fernández, Hovannes Agopyan and Jean-Benoit Morin

based on opto-electronic devices and accelerometers. 11 , 13 , 14 Among these, the Optojump Next (Microgate, Bolzano, Italy) is probably the most widely used because of its high degree of validity and reliability compared with force platforms. 15 , 16 Moreover, contact and aerial times can be used

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Jennifer J. Sherwood, Cathy Inouye, Shannon L. Webb and Jenny O

who are not yet disabled or those with early disability at risk of progression are most likely to benefit from exercise intervention. It is in this population that reliable, valid, and age-appropriate tools are needed to monitor lower limb muscular power. Currently, community exercise programs screen

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Damir Zubac, Drazen Cular and Uros Marusic

Olympic combat athletes, 8 an ongoing debate persists in the literature regarding noninvasive whole-body fluid-deficit characterization in this athletic community. For example, a cross-sectional study of Fernandez-Elias et al 9 recommended U SG as a valid alternative to track fluid deficit in Spanish

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Darren Steeves, Leo J. Thornley, Joshua A. Goreham, Matthew J. Jordan, Scott C. Landry and Jonathon R. Fowles

tests was investigated to determine their utility in a kayak-specific testing program. Methods Participants The study consisted of a reliability segment followed by a validity segment. Highly trained male and female kayakers were recruited for both segments of this investigation. All participants were

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Scott A. Conger, Alexander H.K. Montoye, Olivia Anderson, Danielle E. Boss and Jeremy A. Steeves

associated with step counts in wrist-worn devices at slower walking speeds ( Chen, Kuo, Pellegrini, & Hsu, 2016 ; Huang, Xu, Yu, & Shull, 2016 ; Storm, Heller, & Mazza, 2015 ). Speed of movement has been an important variable to consider in determining the validity and accuracy of these accelerometer

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Zachary C. Pope, Nan Zeng, Xianxiong Li, Wenfeng Liu and Zan Gao

technology to provide daily EE estimates at rest, during activities of daily living, and during PA or exercise ( Fitbit, 2016 ; TomTom, 2017 ). Only a paucity of the available literature, however, has conducted smartwatch EE estimate validation. Indeed, literature has mostly examined the validity of

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Bronwyn K. Clark, Nyssa T. Hadgraft, Takemi Sugiyama and Elisabeth A. Winkler

monitor, similarly experienced lower accuracy in location classification when participants transitioned between locations versus when they remained in the same location continuously ( Magistro et al., 2018 ). These findings suggest it may be possible to use Bluetooth to derive valid measures of office

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Nadia C. Valentini, Lisa M. Barnett, Paulo Felipe Ribeiro Bandeira, Glauber Carvalho Nobre, Larissa Wagner Zanella and Rodrigo Flores Sartori

limited to the population in which the instrument was validated; consequently, content and construct validity must be addressed in other cultures ( Vallerand & Halliwell, 1989 ; Yun & Ulrich, 2002 ). A recent validation investigated the use of the 12 FMS items as part of the PMSC in around 200 Portuguese