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Danielle L. Gyemi, Charles Kahelin, Nicole C. George and David M. Andrews

segmenting DXA scans using custom regions of interest is a reliable method for estimating tissue masses of the upper and lower extremities in young adults 12 ; good within-analyst reliability has also been established for the tissue masses of the core body segments. 13 However, the feasibility of

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Ronit Aviram, Netta Harries, Anat Shkedy Rabani, Akram Amro, Ibtisam Nammourah, Muhammed Al-Jarrah, Yoav Raanan, Yeshayahu Hutzler and Simona Bar-Haim

, 24 ). Adults with cerebral palsy (CP) are a growing population and are at increased risk for chronic diseases ( 27 ). Ambulatory adolescents and young adults with CP are also habitually less active than their TD peers and less likely to meet physical activity guidelines ( 3 ) and are therefore at

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Morgan Potter, John C. Spence, Normand Boulé, Jodie A. Stearns and Valerie Carson

. Understanding the longitudinal relationship between PA, ST, and fitness of younger children will help determine the critical age to intervene to improve the fitness of children. In addition, longitudinal evidence can also provide insight on behavioral tracking. If PA and ST patterns in young children are

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Amanda Santos, Sandra Silva-Santos, Michael Duncan, Maria João Lagoa, Susana Vale and Jorge Mota

young schoolchildren (6–9 y). Methods Participants This is a school-based longitudinal study. The data were collected in 2 schools in the metropolitan area of Porto, in the North of Portugal, and the sample was part of the Preschool Physical Activity, Body Composition and Lifestyle Study. For the

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Xiangli Gu, Senlin Chen and Xiaoxia Zhang

inadequate understandings or misconceptions about fitness and physical activity ( Brusseau, Kulinna, & Cothran, 2011 ; Chen & Nam, 2017 ; Keating et al., 2009 ; Pasco & Ennis, 2015 ; Sun, Chen, Zhu, & Ennis, 2012 ). Furthermore, we were unable to locate published research that has examined young children

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Andressa Busch Rocha Pereira and Renato Moraes

their importance, can disturb control of upright stance, thus causing an increase in postural sway ( Bisson, Lajoie, & Bilodeau, 2014 ; Gimmon, Riemer, Oddsson, & Melzer, 2011 ; Vuillerme, Burdet, Isableu, & Demetz, 2006 ). Although older adults typically exhibit more postural sway than young adults

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Olfa Turki, Wissem Dhahbi, Sabri Gueid, Sami Hmaied, Marouen Souaifi and Riadh Khalifa

young, high school, female athletes have been reported 16 following a warm-up with a 2% loading, which was not the case with a 6% loading. In another study, 17 a dynamic warm-up with a 5% loading was not advantageous for increasing lower-extremity power output in high school football players

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Adam D.G. Baxter-Jones and Peter J. Helms

This paper reviews the findings from a longitudinal study following the growth and development of young British athletes. Four sports were studied: gymnastics, soccer, swimming, and tennis. Four main areas of concern were identified and studied: sports injury, growth and development, psychological and psychosocial problems, and physiological functioning. No evidence was found to suggest that training affected growth or sexual development. The incidence and severity of injuries was low. Athletes were shown to have a healthy lifestyle. The negative effects of intensive training at a young age were outweighed by the many social, psychological and health benefits that a serious commitment to sport brought these young people.

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Paul J. McCarthy, Marc V. Jones, Chris G. Harwood and Steve Olivier

One reason sport psychologists teach psychological skills is to enhance performance in sport; but the value of psychological skills for young athletes is questionable because of the qualitative and quantitative differences between children and adults in their understanding of abstract concepts such as mental skills. To teach these skills effectively to young athletes, sport psychologists need to appreciate what young athletes implicitly understand about such skills because maturational (e.g., cognitive, social) and environmental (e.g., coaches) factors can influence the progressive development of children and youth. In the present qualitative study, we explored young athletes’ (aged 10–15 years) understanding of four basic psychological skills: goal setting, mental imagery, self-talk, and relaxation. Young athletes (n= 118: 75 males and 43 females) completed an open-ended questionnaire to report their understanding of these four basic psychological skills. Compared with the older youth athletes, the younger youth athletes were less able to explain the meaning of each psychological skill. Goal setting and mental imagery were better understood than self-talk and relaxation. Based on these fndings, sport psychologists should consider adapting interventions and psychoeducational programs to match young athletes’ age and developmental level.

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Sarah Oxford and Fiona McLachlan

, I want that girl for my team . Before everyone said girls don’t play football.” As the rain persisted, Felipe, Valentina, and a handful of young men and I ran down a steep hill, dodging growling dogs, towards the office. 1 I unlocked the door and raced to turn off the alarm. The group stumbled into