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Nicole M.S. Belanger and Julie Hicks Patrick

The benefits associated with engaging in physical activity are well known, ranging from an increased sense of well being to a decreased risk of developing type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease. 1 Despite these advantages, roughly 36%–53% of college students do not engage in adequate physical

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Lukas K. Gaffney, Oscar D. Lozano, Adriana Almanza, Nubia Ruiz, Alejandro Mantero and Mark Stoutenberg

Physical inactivity is gaining increasing recognition as an international public health dilemma. According to the most recent estimates from the World Health Organization (WHO), 31% of the world’s population is not meeting the minimum recommendations for physical activity. 1 Physical inactivity is

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Joey Lightner, Brandon C. Irwin and Matthew Chrisman

health behaviors. 2 Although much is known about the association between social relationships and health over time, little is known about how they impact physical activity over time. Given that physical inactivity accounts for roughly 5.3 million deaths each year, globally, 3 understanding how changes

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Nicola D. Ridgers, Karen E. Lamb, Anna Timperio, Helen Brown and Jo Salmon

Childhood is a critical age for establishing health behaviors that provide important benefits to both short- and long-term physical, mental, and social health. 1 Higher levels of physical activity during childhood, for example, are associated with positive mental health and cognitive development

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Kendra R. Todd and Kathleen A. Martin Ginis

The rationale for the intervention is flawed (i.e., to decrease sedentary behavior in people with spinal cord injury). A person with SCI, by definition, will always be sedentary. — Anonymous journal reviewer People living with spinal cord injury (SCI) are at the lowest end of the physical-activity

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Eric T. Hyde, John D. Omura, Kathleen B. Watson, Janet E. Fulton and Susan A. Carlson

Engaging in regular physical activity is one of the most important things people of all ages can do to improve their health. 1 , 2 In 2008, the US Department of Health and Human Services released the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans (Guidelines) , which contain separate physical

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Rajni Rai, Michelle I. Jongenelis, Ben Jackson, Robert U. Newton and Simone Pettigrew

aging. Regular physical activity can delay the morbidity associated with aging and extend the years of active independent living ( Bauman, Merom, Bull, Buchner, & Fiatarone Singh, 2016 ; Rhodes, Janssen, Bredin, Warburton, & Bauman, 2017 ; Taylor, 2014 ). However, adults aged 60 and older represent

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Danae Dinkel, Dipti Dev, Yage Guo, Emily Hulse, Zainab Rida, Ami Sedani and Brian Coyle

Early childhood is a critical time period for developing physical activity behaviors. 1 During this time, ∼74% of all 3- to 6-year-old children in the United States are in some form of nonparental care, and children 3 years old and younger spend an average of 29 hours per week in child care with a

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Nicolas Farina and Ruth G. Lowry

The benefits of physical activity are well established, being able to prevent or delay the onset of a variety of chronic diseases ( Singh, 2002 ), as well as improving physical fitness, reducing depression, anxiety, and mortality ( Dunn, Trivedi, & O’Neal, 2001 ; Hupin et al., 2015 ; Warburton

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Molly P. O’Sullivan, Matthew R. Nagy, Shannon S. Block, Trevor R. Tooley, Leah E. Robinson, Natalie Colabianchi and Rebecca E. Hasson

Both acute and chronic exposure to physical activity have been associated with a compensatory reduction in habitual physical activity in children ( 6 ). Consistent with the ActivityStat hypothesis, when children increase their physical activity levels or energy expenditure in one domain, they may