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Nicole M.S. Belanger and Julie Hicks Patrick

The benefits associated with engaging in physical activity are well known, ranging from an increased sense of well being to a decreased risk of developing type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease. 1 Despite these advantages, roughly 36%–53% of college students do not engage in adequate physical

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Peter T. Katzmarzyk and Caitlin Mason

Physical activity is important for the prevention of chronic disease morbidity and mortality, and the lack of adequate levels of physical activity represents a growing public health burden around the world. The purpose of this report is to introduce the concept of the “Physical Activity Transition” and to explore the potential effects that declining physical activity levels may play on health and life expectancy as countries undergo economic and demographic changes. Physical activity is related to mortality rates in humans, and the available evidence suggests that the adoption of a lifestyle characterized by lower levels of physical activity will attenuate the expected gains in life expectancy associated with the epidemiological transition. Advances in the measurement of physical activity at work, in the home, for transport, and in leisure time in a wide variety of populations will be integral to advancing the current understanding of how macro-level factors shape physical activity patterns and patterns of morbidity and mortality.

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Donna L. Goodwin and Amanda Ebert

Physical activity programs for youth extend beyond school-based opportunities (physical education, intramurals, and recess) to encompass family, neighborhood, and community programs ( Beets, Wallner, & Beighle, 2010 ; Kohl & Cook, 2013 ). Community-based after-school programs, those that are not

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Nicola D. Ridgers, Karen E. Lamb, Anna Timperio, Helen Brown and Jo Salmon

Childhood is a critical age for establishing health behaviors that provide important benefits to both short- and long-term physical, mental, and social health. 1 Higher levels of physical activity during childhood, for example, are associated with positive mental health and cognitive development

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Joey Lightner, Brandon C. Irwin and Matthew Chrisman

health behaviors. 2 Although much is known about the association between social relationships and health over time, little is known about how they impact physical activity over time. Given that physical inactivity accounts for roughly 5.3 million deaths each year, globally, 3 understanding how changes

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Rosenda Murillo, Pooja Agrawal, Sheila Berenji-Jalaei, Elizabeth Vasquez and Sandra Echeverria

Meeting the aerobic physical activity guideline has been linked to positive health outcomes, such as decreased risk of coronary heart disease, colon cancer, and diabetes. 1 However, Latino adults are less likely to meet aerobic physical activity guidelines compared with non-Latino adults. 1 , 2

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Lukas K. Gaffney, Oscar D. Lozano, Adriana Almanza, Nubia Ruiz, Alejandro Mantero and Mark Stoutenberg

Physical inactivity is gaining increasing recognition as an international public health dilemma. According to the most recent estimates from the World Health Organization (WHO), 31% of the world’s population is not meeting the minimum recommendations for physical activity. 1 Physical inactivity is

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Paul J. Collings, Diane Farrar, Joanna Gibson, Jane West, Sally E. Barber and John Wright

Physical activity confers myriad benefits to the uncomplicated pregnancy, 1 benefits that can have long-term health impacts for the developing fetus. 2 , 3 Our understanding that intrauterine environments can program susceptibility to future disease has developed over the last 2 decades. 4 This

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Eric T. Hyde, John D. Omura, Kathleen B. Watson, Janet E. Fulton and Susan A. Carlson

Engaging in regular physical activity is one of the most important things people of all ages can do to improve their health. 1 , 2 In 2008, the US Department of Health and Human Services released the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans (Guidelines) , which contain separate physical

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Rajni Rai, Michelle I. Jongenelis, Ben Jackson, Robert U. Newton and Simone Pettigrew

aging. Regular physical activity can delay the morbidity associated with aging and extend the years of active independent living ( Bauman, Merom, Bull, Buchner, & Fiatarone Singh, 2016 ; Rhodes, Janssen, Bredin, Warburton, & Bauman, 2017 ; Taylor, 2014 ). However, adults aged 60 and older represent