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Rajni Rai, Michelle I. Jongenelis, Ben Jackson, Robert U. Newton and Simone Pettigrew

has become an important priority within health policy ( World Health Organization, 2015 ). Participation in regular physical activity can prevent the onset and progression of age-related chronic diseases and can reduce functional and cognitive decline, thus contributing to healthy aging and improved

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René van Bavel, Gabriele Esposito, Tom Baranowski and Néstor Duch-Brown

Increased levels of moderate and vigorous physical activity (PA) are beneficial for the general population, and therefore, recommended by public health institutions ( Department of Health and Human Services, 2008 ; World Health Organization, 2010 ). However, because getting people to be physically

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Donna L. Goodwin and Amanda Ebert

Physical activity programs for youth extend beyond school-based opportunities (physical education, intramurals, and recess) to encompass family, neighborhood, and community programs ( Beets, Wallner, & Beighle, 2010 ; Kohl & Cook, 2013 ). Community-based after-school programs, those that are not

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Dimitrios Poulimeneas, Maria I. Maraki, Eleni Karfopoulou, Yannis Koutras, Stavrie Chrysostomou, Costas A. Anastasiou, Stavros A. Kavouras and Mary Yannakoulia

Recent guidelines strongly recommend high levels of physical activity for retaining weight loss and mitigating weight regain. 1 , 2 Existing evidence suggests that successful postdieters more or less abide by this guidance: maintainers exercise for 30 to 60 minutes per day 3 , 4 and engage in

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Lukas K. Gaffney, Oscar D. Lozano, Adriana Almanza, Nubia Ruiz, Alejandro Mantero and Mark Stoutenberg

Physical inactivity is gaining increasing recognition as an international public health dilemma. According to the most recent estimates from the World Health Organization (WHO), 31% of the world’s population is not meeting the minimum recommendations for physical activity. 1 Physical inactivity is

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Kendra R. Todd and Kathleen A. Martin Ginis

The rationale for the intervention is flawed (i.e., to decrease sedentary behavior in people with spinal cord injury). A person with SCI, by definition, will always be sedentary. — Anonymous journal reviewer People living with spinal cord injury (SCI) are at the lowest end of the physical-activity

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Nicole M.S. Belanger and Julie Hicks Patrick

The benefits associated with engaging in physical activity are well known, ranging from an increased sense of well being to a decreased risk of developing type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease. 1 Despite these advantages, roughly 36%–53% of college students do not engage in adequate physical

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Nicola D. Ridgers, Karen E. Lamb, Anna Timperio, Helen Brown and Jo Salmon

Childhood is a critical age for establishing health behaviors that provide important benefits to both short- and long-term physical, mental, and social health. 1 Higher levels of physical activity during childhood, for example, are associated with positive mental health and cognitive development

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Joey Lightner, Brandon C. Irwin and Matthew Chrisman

health behaviors. 2 Although much is known about the association between social relationships and health over time, little is known about how they impact physical activity over time. Given that physical inactivity accounts for roughly 5.3 million deaths each year, globally, 3 understanding how changes

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Rosenda Murillo, Pooja Agrawal, Sheila Berenji-Jalaei, Elizabeth Vasquez and Sandra Echeverria

Meeting the aerobic physical activity guideline has been linked to positive health outcomes, such as decreased risk of coronary heart disease, colon cancer, and diabetes. 1 However, Latino adults are less likely to meet aerobic physical activity guidelines compared with non-Latino adults. 1 , 2