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Alexander H.K. Montoye, Jordana Dahmen, Nigel Campbell and Christopher P. Connolly

activity counts recorded by the AG to Calorie data ( Freedson, Melanson, & Sirard, 1998 ; Sasaki, John, & Freedson, 2011 ); these are henceforth abbreviated as AG 1998 and AG 2011. Since metabolism lags behind the true metabolic cost of an activity when changing intensities ( McArdle, Katch, & Katch, 2015

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Emma E. Sypes, Genevieve Newton and Zakkoyya H. Lewis

, “a wearable device that objectively measures lifestyle PA and can provide feedback, beyond the display of basic activity count information, via the monitor display or through a partnering application to elicit continual self-monitoring of activity behaviour.” 4 These devices continue to be developed

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Cheryl A. Howe, Kimberly A. Clevenger, Danielle McElhiney, Camille Mihalic and Moira A. Ragan

determine the average activity counts and steps during the activities. The metabolic and accelerometry data are provided in a Supplemental Table (available online). Perceived State PA Enjoyment During the rest periods immediately following each activity, the children used the 4-item HHS to score their

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Kenneth E. Powell, Abby C. King, David M. Buchner, Wayne W. Campbell, Loretta DiPietro, Kirk I. Erickson, Charles H. Hillman, John M. Jakicic, Kathleen F. Janz, Peter T. Katzmarzyk, William E. Kraus, Richard F. Macko, David X. Marquez, Anne McTiernan, Russell R. Pate, Linda S. Pescatello and Melicia C. Whitt-Glover

): 2353 – 2358 . PubMed ID: 25785930 doi:10.1249/MSS.0000000000000662 10.1249/MSS.0000000000000662 25785930 45. Wolff-Hughes DL , Fitzhugh EC , Bassett DR , Churilla JR . Total activity counts and bouted minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity: relationships with cardiometabolic

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GM competence and PA were assessed using the Bayley Scales of Infant Development – 3rd ed. and ActiGraph GT3X-BT accelerometers. PA was measured over 3 days and the average activity counts per minute at the wrist and ankle were calculated. Rate of weight gain was calculated by entering each infants

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Robert W. Motl and Rachel Bollaert

under free-living conditions, and specific algorithms can be applied for quantifying the intensity of activity based on the classification of arbitrary units (i.e., accelerometer/activity counts) over a specified time period or epoch (i.e., 1 min) into “buckets” or categories. The classification

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Heidi J. Syväoja, Anna Kankaanpää, Jouni Kallio, Harto Hakonen, Janne Kulmala, Charles H. Hillman, Anu-Katriina Pesonen and Tuija H. Tammelin

requiring balance and agility as well as social aspects of PA, which typically do not accumulate activity counts. Alternatively, accelerometer-based MVPA may illustrate cardiovascular activity with increased heart rate and respiratory frequency over other forms of PA. Accordingly, capturing children’s PA in

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Tiago V. Barreira, Stephanie T. Broyles, Catrine Tudor-Locke, Jean-Philippe Chaput, Mikael Fogelholm, Gang Hu, Rebecca Kuriyan, Estelle V. Lambert, Carol A. Maher, José A. Maia, Timothy Olds, Vincent Onywera, Olga L. Sarmiento, Martyn Standage, Mark S. Tremblay, Peter T. Katzmarzyk and for the ISCOLE Research Group

episode time distinct from waking nonwear time, and this was done using a 60-second epoch and published automated algorithms. 18 , 19 After exclusion of the nocturnal sleep episode time, nonwear time was determined as any sequence of at least 20 consecutive minutes of zero activity counts. 20 Once

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Kenneth E. Powell and Steven N. Blair

risk-factor status of individuals meeting the commonly recommended volume of MVPA primarily with bouts ≥10 min in duration with that of individuals with comparable MVPA activity counts accumulated primarily with bouts <10 min in duration. Of 40 comparisons in these 14 studies, 78% (31) indicated that

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Amherst Recent studies have used triaxial accelerometer activity counts to distinguish standing time from sitting time. Further research is needed on methods for classifying standing versus sitting using step-based metrics. Sparsely detected steps peppered into strings of 0 steps/min (i.e., zero cadence