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Jeffrey G. Caron, Gordon A. Bloom, Karen M. Johnston and Catherine M. Sabiston

The purpose of this study was to understand the meanings and lived experiences of multiple concussions in professional hockey players using hermeneutic, idiographic, and inductive approaches within an interpretative phenomenological analysis. The interviewer was an athlete who had suffered multiple concussions, and the interviewees were five former National Hockey League athletes who had retired due to medically diagnosed concussions suffered during their careers. The men discussed the physical and psychological symptoms they experienced as a result of their concussions and how the symptoms affected their professional careers, personal relationships, and quality of life. The former professional athletes related these symptoms to the turmoil that is ever present in their lives. These findings are of interest to athletes, coaches, sport administrators, family members, sport psychology practitioners, and medical professionals, as they highlight the severity of short- and long-term effects of concussions.

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Linda Lin, Richard P. Halgin, Arnold D. Well and Ira Ockene

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Jennifer Moshak

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Marcus K. Taylor, Ricardo Pietrobon, Deng Pan, Michael Huff and Laurence D. Higgins

Background:

Physical inactivity is a risk factor for poor mental health. The present study evaluates the association between mental health and physical activity levels according to the Healthy People 2010 guidelines in a large national sample.

Methods:

Participants (N = 41,914) were selected from the 2001 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Primary predictor variable was physical activity level, and primary outcome measure was frequency of mental distress. Specific outcomes of anxiety and depressive symptoms were also measured.

Results:

Compared with those meeting the Healthy People 2010 guidelines, sedentary participants were 1.31 times more likely to experience 14 or more days of mental distress during the past 30 days (OR 1.31, 95% CI 1.16, 1.48), 1.34 times more likely to experience anxiety symptoms (OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.21, 1.49), and 1.22 times more likely to experience depressive symptoms (OR 1.22, 95% CI 1.10, 1.36). Comparing those participants falling short of the Healthy People 2010 recommendation with those meeting the guideline, no significant group differences were demonstrated relative to frequency of mental distress. Those meeting the recommendation were more likely to have 14 or more days of anxiety symptoms during the past 30 days (OR 1.10, 95% CI 1.02, 1.17).

Conclusions:

Our results suggest that being sedentary is clearly associated with more aversive psychological symptoms. However, performing enough physical activity to meet the Healthy People 2010 guideline may not be associated with better psychological status than minimal amounts of physical activity.

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Cadeyrn J. Gaskin, Melinda Craike, Mohammadreza Mohebbi, Kerry S. Courneya and Patricia M. Livingston

Background:

The ENGAGE (efficacy of a referral and physical activity program for survivors of prostate cancer) study established that a clinician referral and 12-week exercise training program increased vigorous physical activity at 12 weeks among men with prostate cancer. Here, we report the 6- and 12-month outcomes.

Methods:

In this multicenter cluster randomized controlled trial, we compared a clinician referral and exercise training program to usual care. Discounted gym membership was offered to men in the intervention condition on completion of the 12-week exercise program. Self-reported physical activity at 6 and 12 months was the primary outcome. Quality of life, anxiety, and depressive symptoms were secondary outcomes.

Results:

A total of 147 men meeting eligibility criteria agreed to participate (54 intervention, 93 control). A positive interaction effect for vigorous physical activity was observed at 6 months, but not 12 months. No significant effects for the secondary outcomes were found.

Conclusions:

A clinician referral and community-based supervised and unsupervised exercise training program, along with discounted gym membership, had a positive short-term effect on vigorous physical activity levels, but did not improve quality of life, in men with prostate cancer.

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Hiroko Kukihara, Niwako Yamawaki, Michiyo Ando, Yoshiko Tamura, Kumi Arita and Emiko Nakashima

morale may reduce the risk of depression and increase their physical and mental well-being. Consequently, the purpose of this study was to examine the mediating effects of such psychological factors, namely, resilience (a personality characteristic that enhances individual adaptation and positively

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Özlem Feyzioğlu, Özgul Öztürk, Bilsen Sirmen and Selim Muğrabi

strength, and decrease of knee range of motion (ROM) can be seen. 9 Pain and activity limitation during early rehabilitation period after surgery cannot be ruled out and it can cause depression in individuals by affecting quality of life. 10 , 11 The primary goal of early rehabilitation after ACLR is to

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Diego Munguia-Izquierdo, Carmen Mayolas-Pi, Carlos Peñarrubia-Lozano, Federico Paris-Garcia, Javier Bueno-Antequera, Miguel Angel Oviedo-Caro and Alejandro Legaz-Arrese

disturbance, use of sleeping medications, and daytime dysfunction. These component scores are then summed to yield a global score, ranging from 0 to 21, with higher scores indicating worse sleep quality. Psychological Symptoms: Depression and Anxiety We used the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale 21 to

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Yara Fidelix, Mara C. Lofrano-Prado, Leonardo S. Fortes, James O. Hill, Ann E. Caldwell, João P. Botero and Wagner L. do Prado

adaptability, bad behavior, and behavior disorder problems compared with eutrophic pairs. 2 , 3 Some psychological aspects such as low self-esteem, 2 depression, 4 anxiety, 5 and suicidal thoughts 6 have a significant influence on mental health and the quality of life of adolescents with obesity. Aerobic