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Malissa Martin, Natasha Darbar and Monique Mokha

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Barbara N. Campaigne, Kyle W. Landt, Frederick W. James, Joan Reimar, Wayne Mays and Mark A. Sperling

Systolic time intervals (STI) were measured before and after exercise in 18 diabetic adolescents (D) and 18 age- and sex-matched nondiabetic controls (C). At similar heart rates, pre-exercise pre-ejection period (PEP) and left ventricular ejection time (LVET) were significantly shorter in D compared to C (p<0.05). There was no difference between the two groups in the PEP/LVET ratio. Following exercise there were no differences in STIs between groups. However, the change in PEP and LVET from pre- to postexercise was significantly less in D compared to C (delta PEP 38 vs. 53±3 msec, p<0.01; delta LVET 120 vs. 134±4 msec, p<0.05). These data suggest a hypercontractile state at rest in D and a blunted response to exercise when compared to C. This study provides data that may be relevant to the early identification of individuals at risk for premature diabetic cardiomyopathy.

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Vitor Pires Lopes, Pedro Magalhães, José Bragada and Catarina Vasques

Background:

Several methods exist to asses and control physical intensity levels of subjects engaged in physical activities programs, accelerometry is a method that could be easily used in the field. The purposes were: to calibrate Actigraph in middle-aged to old obese/overweight and DM2 adult patients; and to determine the threshold counts for sedentary, light, moderate, and vigorous physical activity (PA).

Methods:

Sample comprise 26 participants (62.6 ± 6.5 years of age) of both gender. Counts and VO2 were simultaneously assessed during: resting, seating, standing, walking at 2.5 km·h−1, 5 km·h−1, and 6 km·h−1. A hierarchical linear model was used to derive a regression equation between MET and counts. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis was used to define thresholds for PA levels.

Results:

The regression equation was: MET = 1.388400490262 + 0.001312683420044 (counts·min−1), r = .867. The threshold counts for sedentary-light, light-moderate and moderate-vigorous PA were: 200, 1240, 2400 counts·min−1 respectively.

Conclusion:

The Actigraph is a valid and useful device for the assessment of the amount of time spent in each PA intensity levels in obese/overweight and DM2 middle-aged to old adult patients.

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Emily Read

Background:

Rural Canadians are at increased risk of metabolic syndrome. Physical inactivity is a primary target for preventing and reversing metabolic syndrome. Adherence to lifestyle interventions may be enhanced using cell phones and self-monitoring technologies. This study investigated the feasibility of a physical activity and self-monitoring intervention targeting high-risk adults in rural Ontario.

Methods:

Rural adults (n = 25, mean = 57.0 ± 8.7 years) with ≥ 2 criteria for metabolic syndrome participated in an 8-week stage-matched physical activity and self-monitoring intervention. Participants monitored blood glucose, blood pressure, weight, and physical activity using self-monitoring devices and Blackberry Smart phones. VO2max, stage of change, waist circumference, weight, blood lipids, and HbA1c were measured at weeks 1, 4, and 8.

Results:

Adherence to self-monitoring was > 94%. Participants’ experiences and perceptions of the technology were positive. Mean stage of change increased 1 stage, physical activity increased 26%, and predicted VO2max increased 17% (P < .05). Significant changes in weight, waist circumference, diastolic blood pressure, LDL cholesterol, and total cholesterol were found.

Conclusions:

This stage-matched technology intervention for increased physical activity was feasible and effective.

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André O. Werneck, Edilson S. Cyrino, Paul J. Collings, Enio R.V. Ronque, Célia L. Szwarcwald, Luís B. Sardinha and Danilo R. Silva

It is estimated that hypertension, type 2 diabetes, and heart disease are responsible for 2%, 2.7%, and 25% of all-cause mortality worldwide. 1 Although a relatively new risk factor, sedentary behavior, defined as any waking behavior that is characterized by an energy expenditure ≤1.5 metabolic

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Beatriz H. Thames and Stacey L. Gorniak

have indicated that persons with type II diabetes also exhibit subtle motor function changes of the fingers. 14 – 16 Patients with type II diabetes are known to be susceptible to skin changes including tactile impairment, vascular compromise, and dry skin. Recent data also indicates that tactile

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Ítalo Ribeiro Lemes, Xuemei Sui, Bruna Camilo Turi-Lynch, Steven N. Blair, Rômulo Araújo Fernandes, Jamile Sanches Codogno and Henrique Luiz Monteiro

been associated with Type 2 diabetes ( Goldfield et al., 2013 ; Grøntved & Hu, 2011 ), depression ( Zhai, Zhang, & Zhang, 2015 ), hypertension ( Shiue, 2015 ), CVD ( Grøntved & Hu, 2011 ), and mortality ( Grøntved & Hu, 2011 ; Turi et al., 2018 ). A recent meta-analysis found a dose

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Dietrich Rothenbacher, Dhayana Dallmeier, Michael D. Denkinger, Bernhard O. Boehm, Wolfgang Koenig, Jochen Klenk and ActiFE Study Group

Sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) is the blood transport protein for testosterone and other steroids. Low SHBG serum levels are associated with many adverse health effects in older adults, including metabolic syndrome, diabetes, endothelial function, specific cancers, and low bone mineral density