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Jian Xu, Poram Choi, Robert W. Motl and Stamatis Agiovlasitis

ID have low levels of physical functioning ( Oppewal, Hilgenkamp, van Wijck, Schoufour, & Evenhuis, 2014 ). Physical fitness levels are also very low, and balance and gait problems have been found in this group of people ( Enkelaar, Smulders, van Schrojenstein Lantman-de Valk, Geurts, & Weerdesteyn

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Diana Castaneda-Gameros, Sabi Redwood and Janice L. Thompson

PA recommendations; and 3) perceived role of PA in maintaining physical function. Since different translators were used depending on the participants’ language needs, they were instructed to discuss PA in terms of any activity participants engaged in, from housework, to general walking, and formal

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Kenneth E. Powell, Abby C. King, David M. Buchner, Wayne W. Campbell, Loretta DiPietro, Kirk I. Erickson, Charles H. Hillman, John M. Jakicic, Kathleen F. Janz, Peter T. Katzmarzyk, William E. Kraus, Richard F. Macko, David X. Marquez, Anne McTiernan, Russell R. Pate, Linda S. Pescatello and Melicia C. Whitt-Glover

) reduced feelings of anxiety and depression in healthy people and in people with existing clinical syndromes, and (4) improved cognitive function across the life span. Regular physical activity improves bone health and weight status in children 3 to <6 years and physical function among older people

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Jeanette M. Thom, Sharon M. Nelis, Jennifer K. Cooney, John V. Hindle, Ian R. Jones and Linda Clare

; McPhee et al., 2016 ; Whitehead & Blaxton, 2017 ). The health benefits of physical activity in older adults are wide ranging and include the more obvious increases in fitness and strength, as well as increases in the overall quality of life, physical function, balance, and cognitive function ( Campisi

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Blair Crewther, Konrad Witek, Paweł Draga, Piotr Zmijewski and Zbigniew Obmiński

measures would be negatively related to initial T levels. As a secondary aim, we investigated other indicators of physical function and blood hematology, but no firm hypotheses were made regarding these outcomes. Methods Subjects A total of 16 male climbers with a mean (± SD ) age of 35.4 ±7.3 years

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Koren L. Fisher, Bruce A. Reeder, Elizabeth L. Harrison, Brenda G. Bruner, Nigel L. Ashworth, Punam Pahwa, Nazmi Sari, M. Suzanne Sheppard, Christopher A. Shields and Karen E. Chad

two separate tests of physical function. All testing was carried out by Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology Certified Exercise Physiologists (CSEP-CEPs), all of whom were blind to the participants’ group allocation. Outcome Measures Physical activity The Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly

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Marlana J. Kohn, Basia Belza, Miruna Petrescu-Prahova, Christina E. Miyawaki and Katherine H. Hohman

This study examined participant demographic and physical function characteristics from EnhanceFitness, an evidence-based physical activity program for older adults. The sample consisted of 19,964 older adults. Participant data included self-reported health and demographic variables, and results for three physical function tests: chair stand, arm curls, and timed up-and-go. Linear regression models compared physical function test results among eight program site types. Participants were, on average, 72 years old, predominantly female, and reported having one chronic condition. Residential site participants’ physical function test results were significantly poorer on chair stand and timed up-and-go measures at baseline, and timed up-and-go at a four-month follow-up compared with the reference group (senior centers) after controlling for demographic variables and site clustering. Evidence-based health-promotion programs offered in community settings should assess demographic, health, and physical function characteristics to best serve participants’ specific needs, and offer classes tailored to participant function and ability while maintaining program fidelity.

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Margaret Delaney, Meghan Warren, Brian Kinslow, Hendrik de Heer and Kathleen Ganley

29,902 participants completed the questionnaires and examinations during the 2011–2016 period. Participants who refused or who had missing data from any survey (including demographics, physical activity, physical function, or other health conditions) were excluded. The present study included

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K. Dillon and Harry Prapavessis

mild to moderate cognitive impairment residing in an AL setting. A secondary purpose was to examine the effectiveness of the intervention on the residents’ cognitive function, physical function, and quality of life (QoL). We hypothesized that there would be high compliance to the prompted bouts of PA

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Lucelia Luna de Melo, Verena Menec, Michelle M. Porter and A. Elizabeth Ready

This study examined the associations between walking behavior and the perceived environment and personal factors among older adults. Sixty participants age 65 yr or older (mean 77 ± 7.27, range 65–92) wore pedometers for 3 consecutive days. Perceived environment was assessed using the Neighborhood Environment Walk-ability Scale (abbreviated version). Physical function was measured using the timed chair-stands test. The mean number of steps per day was 5,289 steps (SD = 4,029). Regression analyses showed a significant association between personal factors, including physical function (relative rate = 1.05, p < .01) and income (RR = 1.43, p < .05) and the average daily number of steps taken. In terms of perceived environment, only access to services was significantly related to walking at the univariate level, an association that remained marginally significant when controlling for personal characteristics. These results suggest that among this sample of older adults, walking behavior was more related to personal and intrinsic physical capabilities than to the perceived environment.