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Marcelo Eduardo de Souza Nunes, Umberto Cesar Correa, Marina Gusman Thomazi Xavier de Souza, Luciano Basso, Daniel Boari Coelho and Suely Santos

the club backward a little before hitting the ball.  5. Keep looking at the ball while moving the club back.  6. Move the club forward more slowly to hit the ball weakly.  7. Make a pendulum-like move without flexing the wrist.  8. Keep looking at the red mark (tee) for at least one second after

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James J. Annesi

.1037/a0014604 19702373 10.1037/a0014604 18. Johnson SS , Paiva AL , Mauriello L , Prochaska JO , Redding C , Velicer WF . Coaction in multiple behavior change interventions: consistency across multiple studies on weight management and obesity prevention . Health Psychol . 2014 ; 33

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Farnoosh Mafi, Soheil Biglari, Alireza Ghardashi Afousi and Abbas Ali Gaeini

. Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology, 330 ( 1 ), 1 – 9 . PubMed ID: 20801187 doi:10.1016/j.mce.2010.08.015 10.1016/j.mce.2010.08.015 Dill , D.B. , & Costill , D.L. ( 1974 ). Calculation of percentage changes in volumes of blood, plasma, and red cells in dehydration . Journal of Applied Physiology

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Diane M. Culver, Erin Kraft, Cari Din and Isabelle Cayer

engagement  • Third GENC meeting: Vancouver, BC February 2019  • Knowledge transfer opportunity at the Canada Games in Red Deer, Alberta April 2019  • Fourth GENC meeting and poster presentation CoP Webinar: Introduction to the program evaluation May 2018  • In person practical session on program evaluations

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Jimmy Sanderson

This research explored people’s expression of parasocial interaction (PSI) on Boston Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling’s blog, 38pitches.com. A thematic analysis using grounded theory (Glaser & Strauss, 1967) and constant comparative methodology of 1,337 postings on Schilling’s blog was conducted. Three parasocial aspects emerged from data analysis: identification, admonishment and advice giving, and criticism. The findings of the study provide support for previous research that suggests identification is a PSI component, and given the large presence of admonishment and criticism, the findings extend PSI theory by suggesting that PSI theory must account for and encompass negative relational behaviors. The results also indicate that people’s use of information and communication technologies is reconfiguring parasocial relationships as fans take an active role in soliciting and communicating with professional athletes, subsequently creating more opportunities for PSI to occur.

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Chang Wan Woo, Jung Kyu Kim, Cynthia Nichols and Lu Zheng

Numerous studies examining the portrayals of gender, race, and nationality in sports commentary have been conducted through the years; however, comparative analyses of commentaries from different countries have been rare. This study examined commentary from 3 different countries (the U.S., Chinese Taipei, and South Korea) during a Major League Baseball (MLB) World Series. An entertainment theory schema was adopted and the 3 countries were categorized based on dispositional relativity (affiliation) with MLB. Findings indicate that South Korean broadcasts, which had the lowest affiliation with MLB, were biased toward the Boston Red Sox and presented the most evaluative commentaries; U.S. commentaries were generally positive and contained the largest portion of informative comments; and Chinese commentaries were unbiased and also provided a large number of informative comments. This implies that sports games using the same visual images can be framed differently by commentators based on the disposition (affiliation) level of audiences.

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Lindsey C. McGuire, Yvette M. Ingram, Michael L. Sachs and Ryan T. Tierney

Depression rates in collegiate student-athletes in the literature are varied and inconclusive, and data have only explored depression symptoms utilizing a crosssectional design. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the temporal course of depression symptoms in student-athletes. Student-athletes (N = 93) from a Division II institution completed six administrations of a brief depression symptom screen once every 2 weeks throughout the fall athletic season. Ten (10.8%) student-athletes’ PHQ-9 surveys were red-flagged for moderate to severe depression symptoms at least once throughout the season. A mixed between-within subjects analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed a significant interaction effect for time and sex in depression symptom scores, F(3.69, 335.70) = 10.36, p ≤ .001. The repeated-measures design of this study suggests that there are clinical benefits for screening for depression symptoms in student-athletes at multiple intervals throughout an athletic season.

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Ariel J. Dimler, Kimberley McFadden and Tara-Leigh F. McHugh

, age, and gender. Contrary to expectations of gendered exercise contexts (i.e., those contexts that are stereotypically perceived as women’s exercise), such as various forms of dance and group exercise/fitness classes ( McGannon & Spence, 2012 ), women in pole classes are “often red-faced and sweating

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Ines Pfeffer and Tilo Strobach

(e.g., GREEN in red ink). Typically, reaction times (RTs) in incongruent trials are larger than in congruent trials (i.e., the Stroop effect), indicating the requirement to inhibit or to override the tendency to produce a more dominant or automatic response on naming the color word in this task

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Tanya R. Berry, Wendy M. Rodgers, Alison Divine and Craig Hall

because the appropriate response deadline to measure sensitivity with a large variable sample such as that recruited for the current research is not certain due to decreased RT and increased intrasubject variability with age, particularly in women ( Der & Deary, 2006 ). Feedback in the form of a red “X