Search Results

You are looking at 61 - 70 of 493 items for :

  • "relationships" x
  • Sport Business and Sport Management x
Clear All
Restricted access

Elizabeth A. Taylor, Gareth J. Jones, Kristy McCray and Robin Hardin

sexes. .750     RapeMyth16—Many women tend to exaggerate the problem of male violence. .719     RapeMyth22—Women often accuse their husbands of marital rape just to retaliate for a failed relationship. .696     RapeMyth23—The discussion about sexual harassment on the job has mainly resulted in many

Restricted access

Marie Hardin, Bu Zhong and Erin Whiteside

U.S. sports operations have been described as newsroom “toy departments,” at least partly because of their deviation from journalistic norms. Recently, however, more attention has focused on issues of ethics and professionalism; the failure of sports journalists to adequately cover steroid use in Major League Baseball has also directed critical attention to their roles and motives. This study, through a telephone survey of journalists in U.S. newsrooms, examines sports reporters’ practices, beliefs, and attitudes in regard to ethics and professionalism and how their ethics and practice relate. Results indicate that reporters’ attitudes toward issues such as voting in polls, taking free tickets, gambling, and becoming friends with sources are related to their views of public-service or investigative journalism. In addition, friendships with sources are linked to values stereotypically associated with sports as a toy-department occupation. These results suggest that adherence to ethical standards is linked to an outlook that embraces sports coverage as public service.

Restricted access

Beth J. Sheehan and Mark A. McDonald

Scant research has been conducted on the relationship between experience-based courses and emotional competency development (Ashkanasy & Dasborough, 2003; Brown, 2003; Clark, Callister & Wallace, 2003; Jaeger, 2002). The current study utilized a mixed method design to determine if students’ emotional competency could be developed during only one semester without any formal instruction in emotional intelligence theory. Changes in the experimental group and differences between experimental and comparison group students’ emotional competency were investigated using quantitative (ECI-U) and qualitative (Critical Incident Interview and exit interview) methods. Study results supported the contention that an experienced-based course can positively impact students’ emotional competency development.

Restricted access

Samuel Y. Todd, Ian Christie, Marshall J. Magnusen and Kenneth J. Harris

This case highlights key elements in Pelled’s (1996) model of diversity, and is based on real life interactions of an actual grounds crew in intercollegiate baseball. The small work group of three individuals collectively prepares the grounds of a new collegiate ballpark for opening day. In the course of daily facility maintenance, the staff encounters both affective and substantive conflict according to Pelled’s model. This leads to both destructive and constructive performance outcomes. Also of issue in the case is the differential relationship that the supervisor shares with each of his subordinates, or leader member exchange (LMX). Together with the teaching notes, the case is designed to highlight (1) elements of group conflict arising from demographic diversity and (2) the nature of LMX within sport organizations. An overview of theory, student applications, and discussion questions and answers are provided to aid instructors in teaching this case.

Restricted access

Norm O’Reilly, Denyse Lafrance Horning and Ghazal Bandeh-Bahman

This case study presents seven challenges regarding the implementation of a National Sport Organization (NSO) loyalty program. Drawing on relationship marketing and sponsorship, the case traces the evolution of the Club Hockey Canada loyalty program, managed by Hockey Canada, a large and successful NSO. The case describes the following seven challenges for managers: resource allocation, process management, branding, rules and regulations for a key element of the program (i.e., Puck Bucks), risk management, sponsorship, and cost recovery. Targeted to upper year undergraduate and graduate students in sport finance or sport marketing, the case is based on information provided by Hockey Canada and secondary research. In completing the case, students will be able to learn about the seven challenges in building a successful loyalty program.

Restricted access

Jacqueline L. Beres and Jess C. Dixon

Mentoring has typically been studied in business environments, with fewer studies focusing on academic contexts and even fewer in the field of sport management. This study examined the mentoring relationships, and specifically the mentoring functions that occurred among sport management doctoral dissertation advisors (mentors) and their doctoral students (protégés). Semistructured telephone interviews were conducted with 13 individuals. Participants collectively described examples of all of Kram’s (1988) mentoring functions, with coaching, counseling, and exposure and visibility cited most frequently. Fewer instances of protection and direct sponsorship were mentioned, although there was evidence of considerable indirect sponsorship. Protégés provided more examples of role modeling as compared with their mentors, and the entire process of completing a doctoral degree can be viewed as a challenging assignment. A discussion of these findings within the context of the relevant previous academic literature and suggestions for future research are also provided.

Restricted access

Jo Williams and Colleen Colles

Increased accountability has led institutions of higher education to search for assessment tools that provide documentation on the achievement of specific learning outcomes. Portfolio assessment has become commonplace among many disciplines but limited work has been presented within sport management. The purpose of this research is to present an adaptable portfolio assessment framework that will allow faculty to assess student learning outcomes using the internship portfolio. Student achievement is assessed in relation to the development of broad-based skills and the application of curriculum content standards. Over 500 entries from 35 portfolios were analyzed via scoring rubrics. Data collected indicated that with appropriate support, the portfolio framework could be used to assess individual student achievement within the desired areas. A positive relationship between portfolio scores and major GPA was found; however, no significant differences in portfolio scores were identified based on job descriptions.

Restricted access

Christopher Atwater, Jered Borup, Robert Baker and Richard E. West

This qualitative case study examined student perceptions of video communication with their instructor in an online research and writing course for sport and recreation graduate students. All students participated in two personalized Skype video calls with the instructor and received two video and text feedback critiques of their written projects. Eight students were interviewed following the course. Despite minor technological and scheduling concerns, students found that their Skype calls helped form a relationship with their instructor and improved their confidence in the course. Students found that video feedback recordings on their written projects were elaborate and friendly, while text feedback comments tended to be more convenient, efficient, and concise. However, all students reported that the advantages of video feedback outweighed the advantages of text. The article concludes with recommendations for future research and for online instructors who wish to effectively blend these forms of communication.

Restricted access

Gina Pauline and Jeffrey S. Pauline

Sport management programs continue to focus on developing innovative pedagogical strategies to prepare students to enter and successfully navigate the rapidly evolving, highly competitive sport industry. One effective tactic is to integrate experiential learning projects into the classroom. This paper describes a collaborative three-year partnership involving a sport management program, athletic department, and corporate sponsor. The relationship provided scholarships for the program, internship opportunities, research funding, and an experiential learning project. Specifically, the lead author applied the metadiscrete experiential learning model developed by Southall, Nagel, LeGrande, and Han (2003) to a client based sponsorship activation project for an upper-level sport marketing course. The paper offers a blueprint and specific recommendations for faculty who wish to develop a client-based collaborative effort that can provide a hands-on learning experience for students and generate programmatic resources, research possibilities, student scholarships, and funding opportunities for an academic program. Such projects can further prepare students as well as enhance the fit between sport management programs and the sport industry.

Restricted access

Soonhwan Lee and Joonyoung Han

The purpose of this study was to examine the required skills and educational background of internship students from the on-site supervisors’ point of view. A questionnaire examined the role of the internship, the skills student interns should possess and several other issues related to the intern’s experiences including the minimum number of hours for student interns’ best experiences, preferred academic backgrounds of student interns, the responsibilities of faculty internship advisors, stipend or salary, important skills student interns should possess, number of student interns organizations accept, practitioners’ thoughts on requiring internships in sport management, chances for student interns to be hired afterwards, and internship evaluation. According to 36 on-site internship supervisors’ responses to the questionnaire, 50% of the major North American professional sport leagues were paying student interns equivalent to only minimum wage or a slightly higher rate compared to the national average a paid intern was receiving ($15.00-$16.00 per hour). Other findings were the number of student interns accepted and the number of hours those interns were expected to work. However, no specific courses were required of students in order to be considered for internships. Overall, grade point average (GPA) was not found to be a main factor on-site internship supervisors used to select appropriate student interns. While it is generally assumed that a cooperative relationship among the student, the onsite internship supervisor and the academic faculty supervisor is vital, on-site internship supervisors were not as cooperative as the literature suggests. It was also determined that student interns were not consistently evaluated to any great extent and therefore a universal manual should be developed for assessment purposes. The findings of this study also documented that on-site internship supervisors and academic faculty supervisors held different expectations and perceptions in terms of fulfilling the requirements for a degree.