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Akira Asada and Yong Jae Ko

participation in sport fan consumption communities . European Sport Management Quarterly, 14 , 50 – 71 . doi:10.1080/16184742.2013.865775 10.1080/16184742.2013.865775 Heere , B. , & James , J.D. ( 2007 ). Sports teams and their communities: Examining the influence of external group identities on team

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Hans C. Schmidt

-related statistics. Instead, the topics of interest to sport fans today—and the topics given attention by sport media—often stretch well beyond the game itself to intersect with other broader issues in society. While sports might once have been “just a game,” today the sporting world intersects with nearly every

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Grace Yan, Dustin Steller, Nicholas M. Watanabe and Nels Popp

sport fans’ behaviors in dynamic and convergent media environments. References Clavio , G. ( 2011 ). Social media and the college football audience . Journal of Issues in Intercollegiate Athletics, 4 , 309 – 325 . Clavio , G. , & Frederick , E. ( 2014 ). Sharing is caring: An exploration of

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Jun Woo Kim, Marshall Magnusen and Hyun-Woo Lee

desirability of the outcome (i.e., winning). Madrigal’s ( 2008 ) conceptualization of sport fans’ emotional responses to game outcomes was based on appraisal theory. An appraisal theory approach to emotion positions emotions as the products of individuals’ evaluations of particular events ( Scherer, Shorr

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Daniel Maderer, Petros Parganas and Christos Anagnostopoulos

). Given the worldwide appeal of sport in general and football (or soccer) in particular ( Blumrodt, Bryson, & Flanagan, 2012 ; Uhrich, 2014 ), sport fans use social media to extend their knowledge, as well as to share experiences and opinions about their club ( Abeza, O’Reilly, Seguin, & Nzindukiyimana

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Hunter Fujak, Stephen Frawley, Heath McDonald and Stephen Bush

positioned as an “ephemeral experience mired in the irrational passions of fans, commanding high levels of product and brand loyalty, optimism and vicarious identification” ( Smith & Stewart, 2010 , p. 3). Although such characterization of sport fans provides for a simple narrative, the degree to which sport

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Adam Karg, Heath McDonald and Civilai Leckie

). Pritchard and Funk ( 2006 ) also looked at channel preferences among sport consumers and found that broadcast was not simply being added to the live consumption practices of sport fans, there were significant cases where broadcast was preferred . They proposed and examined four groups of consumers based on

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Ceyda Mumcu and Gil Fried

introducing new fans to MLS, moving noncommitted and casual fans to greater avidity, and converting aspirational fans to avid fans. In other words, MLS aims to move their spectators and fans up on the sport fan escalator, build a larger highly identified fan base, and ultimately have a loyal (often called

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collected from 505 Philadelphia area sport fans through a partnership with the Philadelphia Inquirer. Results supported the authors’ assertions outlined above with the exception of the moderating role of familiarity with demand-based ticket strategies. Of note in the results, the source of the ticket

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Christopher Rumpf and Christoph Breuer

, Kim, Magnusen, and Lee ( 2017 ) extend the bipolar view of emotions (i.e., positive vs. negative emotions) by providing evidence for mixed emotions felt by individuals; that is, sport fans can experience positive and negative emotions concurrently. In an attempt to better understand the determinants