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R. Douglas Manning, Margaret C. Keiper and Seth E. Jenny

Pedagogical innovation involving smartphone technology paired with complementary applications may offer sport management faculty the opportunity to create an environment of engaging instruction. Technologically enhanced and innovative assignments have the potential to stimulate student interest and critical-thinking skills by presenting new experiences and active learning opportunities via participatory education. Through the discussion of technology integration and pedagogical innovation when teaching millennial students, the purpose of this paper is to provide a conceptual framework—namely, the concerns-based adoption model (CBAM)—to introduce mobile technologies, such as Socrative and Twitter, into the sport management classroom.

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Richard Tinning and Daryl Siedentop

Doyle’s concepts of task structures and the notion of accountability were applied to the student teaching process. Qualitative research strategies were used to gather data for one intern in two settings across an entire academic term. Three main task systems were identified. The contingencies supporting the task structures were less readily identified than for previous classroom and gymnasium research. Accountability systems tended to be less formal. The intern must balance the demands of task systems that produce consequences from pupils, the cooperating teacher, and the university supervisor. Monitoring and feedback from the supervisor and cooperating teacher appear to play an important informal role in the development of intern performance across time.

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Michael W. Metzler

This thematic article is based upon personal reflections and tangible evidence that the emphasis in sport pedagogy has shifted away from doing research on instruction and toward doing research on teachers. Several contributing factors to this trend are discussed along with implications for continued change in the patterns of sport pedagogy. Suggestions are made that could alter these patterns and address how to conduct research on teaching that is both meaningful to practice and valued in the academy. Finally, there is a call to question the role of traditional sport disciplines and subdisciplines in the conduct of professional practice and the conceptualization of sport pedagogy.

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Elizabeth Domangue and Russell Lee Carson

Following the devastation of hurricane Katrina, a university located in the south-eastern United States created a service-learning program. This program was established so that physical education teacher education (PETE) students could provide physical activities to children living in a temporary, government-funded housing community. The purpose of this study was to investigate how the service-learning program shaped preservice teachers’ cultural competency. The participants were 16 PETE students in a curriculum development course. A questionnaire was used to assess changes in the students’ cultural competency. Reflective journals and interviews were qualitative data sources used to identify significant elements of the service-learning program that elicited thoughts about the role of cultural competency in teaching. Findings revealed that there were changes in cultural competency. Triangulation of the data suggested that the service-learning participants identified consistent engagement, exposure to another culture, and an engaged instructor as key contributors to cultural competency within the service-learning program.

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W. James Weese and Shawn Beard

The best universities pride themselves on developing the next generation of leaders as do the top sport management programs. Many sport management programs offer a leadership course, some at the graduate level. However, two questions emerge when discussing the teaching of leadership, namely, what do students need to know about area, and how can the topic be most effectively taught? A recent 12-month educational leave provided a cherished opportunity for the lead author to delve into the latest advancements in leadership and leadership development. The coauthor on this paper took a leadership course in his graduate sport management program and offered the perspective of an end-user. The authors provide an overview of the leadership development literature, profile three unique leadership courses offered in other disciplines, and provide sport management professors with information they should consider in developing and delivering their courses in leadership, especially at the graduate level.

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Alice M. Buchanan

The purpose of this study was to examine the implementation of Hellison’s (1995) responsibility model (TPSR) by staff at an instructional sports camp for at-risk youth. Through ethnographic interviews and observations, three recurring themes were identified that represented contextual challenges to teaching responsibility: (a) understanding and implementing TPSR, (b) perceptions of respect and disrespect, and (c) issues of control. The camp staff varied in their interpretations and implementations of TPSR, with some emphasizing its empowerment potential, while others were unable to relinquish control. These staff viewed TPSR as essentially a disciplinary device. Some of the staff modeled the same attributes that they demanded of the youngsters, while others were inflexible, authoritarian, and disrespectful. Those who were successful in implementing TPSR as suggested by Hellison used the strategies of teachable moments, feedback, and reflection to facilitate self-awareness and empowerment.

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Kevin Patton, Melissa Parker and Erica Pratt

The purpose of this study was to examine the pedagogy of facilitation within physical education professional development (PD). Specific research questions were: 1) What were the self-identified pedagogical strategies employed by facilitators in PD?, and 2) From the perspective of the participants, what strategies contributed to their growth as learners? Participants included fifteen PD facilitators and 88 teachers from eight selected professional learning communities in the U.S. and Europe. Data sources included interviews, artifacts, and field notes. Three participant-centered pedagogical strategies reflected facilitators’ methods and teachers’ perceptions: (a) learning as doing: providing structure without dictating, (b) learning as trying: creating and testing new ideas, and (c) learning as sharing: public presentation of work. By teaching without telling, purposeful facilitator actions contributed to the development of an environment that encouraged teachers to become active participants in the creation of knowledge and development of professional capital.

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James Mandigo, Ken Lodewyk and Jay Tredway

foster the development of physical literacy through physical activity is therefore particularly important. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of a multisport physical activity intramural program that adopted a Teaching Games for Understanding (TGfU) approach on the development of

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Andrew C. Taggart

Clinical and field experiences in physical education teacher education programs have gradually been added to the student teaching experience to allow student teachers more opportunities to develop teaching skills. The quality of these experiences appears to depend largely on the many contextual variables the student teachers confront rather than the successful performance of the teaching skills being practiced. If beginning physical education teachers are to share in a pedagogy developed from research in classroom management, instructional time, and teaching strategies, and if teaching skills are to be developed specific to these areas, then repeated supervised practice in a variety of settings is needed. The teacher education program described contains a sequentially arranged pattern of nine clinical and field experiences culminating in the final student teaching experience. The essential features of the pedagogical experiences are detailed, emphasizing time engaged in practice teaching, teaching skill focus, supervisory/data collection focus, and pupil teacher ratio.

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Sandy K. Beveridge and Sandy K. Gangstead

This study investigated the effects of teaching experience and instruction on visual retention and knowledge of selected sports skills. Prior to and after 30 hours of instruction, 31 experienced teachers and 29 undergraduates were administered the Utah Skills Analysis Test (USKAT) to assess both visual retention of performance and knowledge of correct motor patterns. Before instruction, teachers performed slightly better than undergraduates on the perceptual portion of USKAT, whereas there were no significant differences on the knowledge portion. A repeated measures analysis indicated significant treatment effects across groups on both perceptual and knowledge measures, with undergraduates exhibiting greater pretest to posttest gains than teachers on both dependent variables. A one-way ANOVA conducted on gain score data of subjects blocked into high, medium, and low functional performance levels based upon pretreatment scores revealed significant differences in perceptual performance between the blocks. It was concluded that (a) both teachers and undergraduates demonstrated the ability to improve performance in qualitative skills analysis, (b) undergraduates appear more responsive to specific instructional protocol than experienced teachers, and (c) entry level performance may influence the impact of the protocol on sport skill analysis performance.