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Eric T. Hyde, John D. Omura, Kathleen B. Watson, Janet E. Fulton and Susan A. Carlson

Engaging in regular physical activity is one of the most important things people of all ages can do to improve their health. 1 , 2 In 2008, the US Department of Health and Human Services released the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans (Guidelines) , which contain separate physical

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Danae Dinkel, Dipti Dev, Yage Guo, Emily Hulse, Zainab Rida, Ami Sedani and Brian Coyle

Early childhood is a critical time period for developing physical activity behaviors. 1 During this time, ∼74% of all 3- to 6-year-old children in the United States are in some form of nonparental care, and children 3 years old and younger spend an average of 29 hours per week in child care with a

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Rajni Rai, Michelle I. Jongenelis, Ben Jackson, Robert U. Newton and Simone Pettigrew

aging. Regular physical activity can delay the morbidity associated with aging and extend the years of active independent living ( Bauman, Merom, Bull, Buchner, & Fiatarone Singh, 2016 ; Rhodes, Janssen, Bredin, Warburton, & Bauman, 2017 ; Taylor, 2014 ). However, adults aged 60 and older represent

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Nicolas Farina and Ruth G. Lowry

The benefits of physical activity are well established, being able to prevent or delay the onset of a variety of chronic diseases ( Singh, 2002 ), as well as improving physical fitness, reducing depression, anxiety, and mortality ( Dunn, Trivedi, & O’Neal, 2001 ; Hupin et al., 2015 ; Warburton

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Nisha Botchwey, Myron F. Floyd, Keshia Pollack Porter, Carmen L. Cutter, Chad Spoon, Tom L. Schmid, Terry L. Conway, J. Aaron Hipp, Anna J. Kim, M. Renee Umstattd Meyer, Amanda L. Walker, Tina J. Kauh and Jim F. Sallis

risk. 1 , 2 The same populations often have limited access to safe places and quality programs for physical activity (PA). 3 To help ensure that children grow up at a healthy weight, daily or regular PA is recommended. 4 Improvements in PA environments in neighborhood settings, where children

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Jessica Ross and Peter D. MacIntyre

pursuits ( Csikszentmihalyi, 1975 , 2009 ). Flow is a state of consciousness in which individuals are completely absorbed in an activity, formally defined as “the intense experiential involvement in moment-to-moment activity, which can be either physical or mental ” ( Csikszentmihalyi, 2009 , p. 394

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Yang Bai, Kelly Allums-Featherston, Pedro F. Saint-Maurice, Gregory J. Welk and Norma Candelaria

behaviors. A promising model for understanding youth physical activity (PA) behavior is the Youth Physical Activity Promotion model proposed by Welk ( 40 ). According to this model, youth behavior is determined by independent and interacting psychosocial influences from enabling factors (eg, fitness, skills

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Molly P. O’Sullivan, Matthew R. Nagy, Shannon S. Block, Trevor R. Tooley, Leah E. Robinson, Natalie Colabianchi and Rebecca E. Hasson

Both acute and chronic exposure to physical activity have been associated with a compensatory reduction in habitual physical activity in children ( 6 ). Consistent with the ActivityStat hypothesis, when children increase their physical activity levels or energy expenditure in one domain, they may

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Kenneth E. Powell, Abby C. King, David M. Buchner, Wayne W. Campbell, Loretta DiPietro, Kirk I. Erickson, Charles H. Hillman, John M. Jakicic, Kathleen F. Janz, Peter T. Katzmarzyk, William E. Kraus, Richard F. Macko, David X. Marquez, Anne McTiernan, Russell R. Pate, Linda S. Pescatello and Melicia C. Whitt-Glover

Regular physical activity is associated with a wide range of health benefits. 1 Unfortunately, only about 20% of adults and high school aged youth meet the current federal guidelines for both aerobic and muscle-strengthening physical activity. 2 In 2016, the US Department of Health and Human

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Chris Knoester and Theo Randolph

Research on the benefits of father involvement in children’s lives has become common ( Lamb & Lewis, 2010 ; Sarkadi et al., 2008 ). Similarly, a great deal of work has been done on the implications of sports and other physical activities for health outcomes ( Kahan & McKenzie, 2015 ; Project Play