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Jane E. Clark, Farid Bardid, Nancy Getchell, Leah E. Robinson, Nadja Schott and Jill Whitall

, Henry Marc Halverson investigated the development of reaching and grasping (i.e., prehension) in infants aged 16–52 weeks. This pioneering work, along with Gesell’s Infancy and Human Growth text ( Gesell, 1928 ), marked the beginning of the maturational period (1928–1946) in the field of motor

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Swati M. Surkar, Rashelle M. Hoffman, Brenda Davies, Regina Harbourne and Max J. Kurz

of presentation of visual cue to one of the six target positions of varying endpoint complexity to initiation of hand movement (planning phase), reaching for an object (movement sequence 1), followed by grasping and placing the object in one of six possible target positions (movement sequence 2). The

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Aleš Gába, Lukáš Rubín, Petr Badura, Eliška Roubalová, Erik Sigmund, Michal Kudláček, Dagmar Sigmundová, Jan Dygrýn and Zdenek Hamrik

. They are represented, for instance, by a relatively high number of children and youth participating in organized sports and/or PA programs, or generally PA-friendly setting (e.g., family, school, and built environment). Grasping these opportunities could improve current unsatisfactory state of overall

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Daniela Corbetta, Rebecca F. Wiener, Sabrina L. Thurman and Emalie McMahon

, infants could begin integrating the object physical properties into their goal-directed actions and pre-shape their hand movement in anticipation of grasping it. The bulk of the work reviewed above forged the common held assumption that infant reaching developed in two phases corresponding to two distinct

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Damla Karabay, Yusuf Emük and Derya Özer Kaya

position with feet supported on the floor and climbing track, and shoulders in 90° flexion with hands grasping the slings in pronation; pulls upper body up till 90° elbow flexion and lowers back to starting position Half supine pull-up with slings, supinated grip In a half supine position with feet

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Joshua J. Liddy, Amanda J. Arnold, HyeYoung Cho, Nathaniel L. Romine and Jeffrey M. Haddad

) through an opening (110 × 110 mm) using their dominant hand while standing (Figure  1A ). Hand dominance was assessed via self-report. A circular knob was attached to the center of the block to facilitate grasping. Participants were instructed to grasp the block between their index and middle fingers and

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Jennifer Campbell, Stephanie Rossit and Matthew Heath

actions (see also Khan & Lawrence, 2005 ). In addition, Rossit, McAdam, McLean, Goodale, & Culham (2013 ) employed a conjoint grasping and functional magnetic resonance imaging (i.e., fMRI) study to examine the neural correlates associated with the loVF advantage. Rossit et al.’s behavioral findings

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Andrea R. Taliaferro and Sean M. Bulger

conceptualization and (b) active experimentation and reflective observation ( Kolb, 1984 , 2015 ; Kolb, Boyatzis, & Mainemelis, 2001 ). Learning and knowledge result from a combination of grasping (taking in information) through concrete experience and abstract conceptualization and transforming that experience

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Ran Zheng, Ilana D. Naiman, Jessica Skultety, Steven R. Passmore, Jim Lyons and Cheryl M. Glazebrook

grasping, is consistent with studies of cortical connectivity. Studies that include brain-imaging procedures have shown that people with ASD have decreased long-range connections that are needed for effective visual–motor integration ( Mostofsky & Ewen, 2011 ; Mostofsky et al., 2009 ). Given the gaps in

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Leah E. Robinson

grandparent’s hand, will practice reaching and grasping (e.g., functional skills) when picking up seashells, and both adult and child will engage in motor skills as they run and leap, over the waves crashing onto the shore. As you can see, both the toddler and grandparent are exploring and learning from their