Search Results

You are looking at 71 - 80 of 409 items for :

  • "intervention study" x
Clear All
Restricted access

Katherine A. Tamminen, Kaleigh Ferdinand Pennock and Courtney Braun

of improvement for more robust youth sport coping intervention studies. First, rather than a single intervention timepoint, we suggest a series of in-person sessions for parents and athletes to improve engagement with the material. Second, to address the aforementioned timing issues, we suggest

Restricted access

R. Pla, Y. Le Meur, A. Aubry, J.F. Toussaint and P. Hellard

of the study including the testing weeks. Training Categorization As Mujika et al, 3 we tested the swimmers for [La] b during a 5- × 200-m incremental test in the period preceding the intervention study. This test consisted of 200-m swims at a progressively increasing pace (using an audible signal

Restricted access

Emma L. J. Eyre, Jason Tallis, Susie Wilson, Lee Wilde, Liam Akhurst, Rildo Wanderleys and Michael J. Duncan

understanding current physical activity levels, and in intervention studies to monitor and track changes without the excessive need for downloading and making complex analysis. Future research should seek to further cross-validate the cut-points generated across adult populations of varying fitness levels and

Restricted access

Kathleen T. Rhyner and Amber Watts

Depressive symptoms are common in older adults, but antidepressant medications may be contraindicated or poorly tolerated in this population. Intervention studies demonstrate that exercise may be an effective alternative. This meta-analysis included 41 randomized controlled trials of aerobic and nonaerobic exercise interventions investigating the effect of exercise on depressive symptoms in adults aged 60 or older. A random effects model demonstrated that exercise was associated with significantly lower depression severity (SMD = 0.57, 95% CI 0.36–0.78). This effect was not significantly different for different ages of participants, types of control groups, or types of exercise interventions. Studies requiring a diagnosis of depression had significantly greater mean effect sizes than studies that did not require a depression diagnosis (Qbet = 6.843, df = 1, p = .009). These findings suggest that exercise is an effective treatment option for older individuals with depressive symptoms.

Restricted access

Bernard Gutin and Scott Owens

The purposes of this article were to (1): review recent studies of relations between physical activity and cardiometabolic biomarkers of youths (2); highlight areas in which additional research is needed; and (3) make recommendations for preventive interventions. Observational studies show that youths who engage in high amounts of moderate-vigorous physical activity display a more favorable cardiometabolic biomarker profile than youths who engage in lesser amounts of moderate-vigorous physical activity. Intervention studies in obese youths show that favorable changes in biomarkers are produced by moderate-vigorous physical activity doses of 150–180 min/week. However, for nonobese youths, intervention studies suggest that such doses are not effective; higher moderate-vigorous physical activity doses of approximately 300 min/week seem necessary. Continuing a physically active lifestyle from childhood into the adult years will enable people to maintain less end-organ damage and lower rates of morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes.

Restricted access

Victor H. Mancini, Deborah A. Wuest and Hans van der Mars

This article provides an overview of the application of systematic supervisory strategies in an undergraduate teacher preparation program. Furthermore, the results are reported for a series of intervention studies. These studies were conducted to determine the impact of using systematic supervisory feedback on teacher behaviors and interaction patterns of preservice physical education teachers. Also included are the findings of the effects of such feedback on the trainees’ attitudes toward teaching, the degree to which they exhibited behaviors indicative of effective teaching, and their awareness of their own teaching behavior.

Restricted access

Oded Bar-Or

This review is intended to critically examine the notion that physical training, in addition to its nonspecific effects on fitness, can induce disease-specific benefits in the child with a chronic disease. Conditions included in this analysis are asthma, cerebral palsy, coronary risk, cystic fibrosis, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, myopathies, and obesity. Most of the published intervention studies are deficient in design by not including randomly assigned (or matched) controls. Other constraints stem from the need to simultaneously maintain other therapeutic modalities, the progressive nature of some of the diseases, and the small pool of suitable subjects.

Restricted access

Eric T. Poehlman and Christopher Melby

In this brief review we examine the effects of resistance training on energy expenditure. The components of daily energy expenditure are described, and methods of measuring daily energy expenditure are discussed. Cross-sectional and exercise intervention studies are examined with respect to their effects on resting metabolic rate, physical activity energy expenditure, postexercise oxygen consumption, and substrate oxidation in younger and older individuals. Evidence is presented to suggest that although resistance training may elevate resting metabolic rate, il does not substantially enhance daily energy expenditure in free-living individuals. Several studies indicate that intense resistance exercise increases postexercise oxygen consumption and shifts substrate oxidation toward a greater reliance on fat oxidation. Preliminary evidence suggests that although resistance training increases muscular strength and endurance, its effects on energy balance and regulation of body weight appear to be primarily mediated by its effects on body composition (e.g., increasing fat-free mass) rather than by the direct energy costs of the resistance exercise.

Restricted access

Elizabeth G. Eakin, Ben J. Smith and Adrian E. Bauman

Background:

This article evaluates the extent to which the literature on primary care-based physical activity interventions informs the translation of research into practice and identifies priorities for future research.

Methods:

Relevant databases were searched for: (1) descriptive studies of physician barriers to physical activity counseling (n = 8), and (2) reviews of the literature on primary care-based physical activity intervention studies (n = 9). The RE-AIM framework was used to guide the evaluation.

Results:

Lack of time, limited patient receptiveness, lack of remuneration, and limited counseling skills are the predominant barriers to physical activity counselling. Issues of internal validity (i.e., effectiveness and implementation) have received much more attention in the literature than have issues of external validity (i.e., reach and adoption).

Conclusions:

The research agenda for primary care-based physical activity interventions needs greater attention to the feasibility of adoption by busy primary care staff, generalizability, and dissemination.

Restricted access

Helen C. Wright and David A. Sugden

The nature of developmental coordination disorder (DCD) in a selected group of Singaporean children (n = 69) aged 6-9 years was investigated by two methods: an intergroup comparison of children with DCD and matched controls (n = 69), and an intragroup study on the same children with DCD in the search for subtypes within this group. The results from the two approaches demonstrate that while the children with DCD are clearly different from the control subjects, the difficulties seen within the DCD group are not common to all the children. Four identifiable subtypes were found within the children with DCD. This more specific information gained about the difficulties children with DCD experience is not easily established from the intergroup analysis, suggesting that the design of future intervention studies should incorporate differences found in subtypes of children with DCD.