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Community-Dwelling Older Adults P. Margaret Grant * Philippa M. Dall * Sarah L. Mitchell * Malcolm H. Granat * 4 2008 16 2 201 214 10.1123/japa.16.2.201 A Proposal for a New Screening Paradigm and Tool Called Exercise Assessment and Screening for You (EASY) Barbara Resnick * Marcia G. Ory

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139 10.1123/tsp.5.2.128 A Survey of Coaches and Athletes about Sport Psychology in New Zealand Jane Sullivan * Ken P. Hodge * 6 1991 5 5 2 2 140 140 151 151 10.1123/tsp.5.2.140 A Theoretical Paradigm for Performance Enhancement: The Multimodal Approach Simon Davies * John D. West * 6 1991 5 5

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Courtney W. Hess, Stacy L. Gnacinski and Barbara B. Meyer

, implementation, and evaluation ( Poczwardowski, Sherman, & Ravizza, 2004 ). Such professional philosophies are thought to be informed by theoretical paradigms, practice approaches, and intervention techniques within boundaries of competency ( Poczwardowski et al., 2004 ). Based on prior work in the counseling

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.1123/jmld.2015-0018 ORIGINAL RESEARCH Expecting to Teach Enhances Learning: Evidence From a Motor Learning Paradigm Marcos Daou * Taylor L. Buchanan * Kyle R. Lindsey * Keith R. Lohse * Matthew W. Miller * 12 2016 4 2 197 207 10.1123/jmld.2015-0036 Temporal-Comparative Feedback Affects Motor

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Ines Pfeffer and Tilo Strobach

–behavior gap ( Allom et al., 2016 ). Trait self-control may be differentially associated with the intention–behavior gap depending upon the performance level in the respective executive functions paradigm. Methods A Priori Sample Size Estimation A priori sample size estimation was based on the study of Allom

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Carol M. Liebler and Brian P. Moritz

This study focuses on how sportswriters and other writers engaged in news paradigm repair via the explanations they provided for the failure to catch the Manti Te’o hoax in January 2013. The Te’o story is a particularly provocative context in which to examine such paradigm repair, because the transgression did not lie with a single journalist or news organization but with an entire profession failing to get the story. Reporters, columnists, and bloggers all engaged in repair, although the repair tended to appear most frequently in traditional media and run in nonsport sections. Writers rarely engaged in self-reflexivity, instead assigning blame to others, although they did suggest possible repairs. Nearly all writers pointed to news routines to explain how they had been duped, with particular attention to fact-checking and sources.

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Yu Kyoum Kim and Galen Trail

Sport consumers are increasingly discontented and disconnected with sport organizations and researchers have advocated a fundamental shift in sport marketing from a traditional exchange paradigm to a relationship paradigm. Relationship quality is critical to understanding sport consumer-organization relationships because it can: (a) render a platform to organize wide-ranging relational constructs; (b) provide insight into evaluating relationship-marketing effectiveness; and (c) diagnose and address problems in relationships. Therefore, we propose a conceptual framework of sport consumer-organization relationship quality that consists of three main components. First, we specify that relationship quality consists of five distinct but related relational constructs (trust, commitment, intimacy, self-connection, and reciprocity). Second, we suggest that relationship quality influences word of mouth, media consumption, licensed-product consumption, and attendance behaviors. Finally, we argue that psychographic factors such as relationship styles, relationship drive, and general interpersonal orientation are moderators, as well as demographic factors such as age, gender, ethnicity, region, and income.

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Associative Stimulation Rewired: A Novel Paradigm to Modulate Resting-State Intracortical Connectivity Andrew Hooyman * Alexander Garbin * Beth Fisher * 1 04 2020 18 10 2019 8 1 174 193 10.1123/jmld.2018-0054 jmld.2018-0054 REVIEWS Automated Measures of Force and Motion Can Improve Our Understanding of

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Wendy Frisby

Critical social science is an underused paradigm in sport management. It can, however, help reveal the bad and ugly sides of sport, so we can uncover new ways to promote the good sides of it. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the relevance of this paradigm for sport management teaching, practice, and research. A key assumption of the critical paradigm is that organizations are best viewed as operating in a wider cultural, economic, and political context characterized by asymmetrical power relations that are historically entrenched. Research is not neutral because the goal is to promote social change by challenging dominant ways of thinking and acting that benefit those in power. Conducting critical sport management research requires a specific skill set and adequate training is essential. Drawing on the work of Alvesson and Deetz (2000), the three tasks required to conduct critical social science are insight, critique, and transformative redefinition. These tasks are described and a number of sport-related examples are provided.

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Jason R. Themanson, Nicole J. Bing, Brad E. Sheese and Matthew B. Pontifex

The scientific examination of batting in baseball has undergone an explosion in recent years, with a number of new paradigms aimed at understanding and exploring both behavioral and neuroscientific influences on batting performance. Although this research has made great strides in developing a