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Margarite A. Arrighi and Judith C. Young

The purpose of this investigation was to examine the perceptions of preservice and inservice teachers about successful and effective teaching. Two samples of preservice and inservice teachers responded to open-ended questions concerning their perceptions of teaching effectiveness and their own success. The first sample included 224 beginning physical education majors, student teachers, and inservice physical educators who identified 2,003 effective teaching components which were categorized into 20 different instructional factors by the research team. The second sample included 379 inservice and preservice teachers who were asked about their perceptions of successful teaching. Responses were then categorized by source of success: students, self, others’ reactions, or administrative. Results indicated differences in preservice and inservice teachers’ perceptions, suggesting a pattern of socialization into the teacher role. Teacher perceptions of effective and successful teaching reflected concern for student responses. Effectiveness categories identified included teaching strategy, management and organization, content, and personal characteristics. Perception of successful teaching indicated greater concern for self among preservice than inservice teachers.

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Rick Bell, Kate R. Barrett and Pamela C. Allison

The ability of physical education teachers to observe the movement response of the learner and the environment in which the response takes place is crucial in effective instruction. This study is an initial attempt to identify what a group of 21 preservice physical education teachers reported seeing in a 15-minute games lesson with fourth-grade students. An analytic inductive strategy was employed to categorize the data at two levels of specificity. Results indicated that as a group the preservice teachers focused on a broad range of teacher and student behaviors and lesson elements, but as individuals they had a more limited focus of attention. Level 2 analysis revealed that only 10% of the recorded statements focused on the movement responses of the children and no statements related to the learning environment. If teacher educators deem it important that their majors notice teacher and student behaviors as well as lesson elements, they have to plan more carefully for this to occur, particularly with majors early in their professional education.

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Cynthia Carlisle and D. Allen Phillips

Teacher enthusiasm has long been considered an important part of the teaching process. However, empirical verification of enthusiasm as an indicator of teaching effectiveness is somewhat sparse. One problem is with measuring that complex variable, while another problem has been determining what to correlate it with to allow it to surface as such an indicator. Twenty-four preservice teachers participated in this study to determine the differences in teacher and student behavior between the levels of enthusiasm in trained and untrained teachers. The experimental group was given 6 hours of enthusiasm training whereas the control group received no such training. Both groups taught a 30-minute Experimental Teaching Unit (ETU) to a total of 120 middle-school students. The observation instrument in this study was the Physical Education Teaching Assessment Instrument (PETAI), while the Collins Enthusiasm Rating Scale was used to measure the teachers’ enthusiasm. The trained teachers received much higher ratings in enthusiasm during their ETU lessons and were significantly better on three of the PETAI items. The students of the trained teachers also had higher skill achievement gains over their counterparts under the untrained teachers.

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Chad M. Killian and Amelia Mays Woods

added field time for preservice teachers and to promote an active-learning approach. The documented positive impact that flipped instruction can have on course structure, student learning, and student perceptions served as rationale for redesigning the course using a flipped model. Course Description

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Matthew D. Curtner-Smith, Deborah. S. Baxter and Leah K. May

orientations research areas. PETE = physical education teacher education. The most developed area in value orientations research to date has been that concerned with descriptions and comparisons of the value orientations prioritized by various groups of in-service teachers, preservice teachers, doctoral

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Anne M. Merrem and Matthew D. Curtner-Smith

addition, some particularly weak PETE programs merely serve to support and nurture the faulty thinking of coaching-oriented preservice teachers ( Curtner-Smith, 2009 ; Doolittle, Placek, & Dodds, 1993 ; Richards et al., 2014 ). These programs are often staffed by faculty who lack credibility with

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Experiences Related to Comprehensive School Physical Activity Programming Collin A. Webster * Danielle Nesbitt * Heesu Lee * Cate Egan * 10 2017 36 4 430 444 10.1123/jtpe.2016-0191 “I Know When I Did It, I Got Frustrated” : The Influence of ‘Living’ a Curriculum for Preservice Teachers Michelle

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Statements by Preservice Teachers for Overhand Throwing Performance of Children Sandra A. Stroot * Judith L. Oslin * 10 1993 13 1 24 45 10.1123/jtpe.13.1.24 Observing and Interpreting Teaching-Learning Processes: Novice PETE Students, Experienced PETE Students, and Expert Teacher Educators Kathy C

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1990 9 9 4 4 294 294 306 306 10.1123/jtpe.9.4.294 Effect of Self-Management on Preservice Teachers’ Performance during a Field Experience in Physical Education Eitan Eldar * 7 1990 9 9 4 4 307 307 323 323 10.1123/jtpe.9.4.307 Children’s Attitudes Toward Physical Activity in Classes Taught by

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Perspectives for Teaching Physical Education: Preservice Teachers’ Reflections on Outdoor and Adventure Education Gay L. Timken * Jeff McNamee * 1 2012 31 1 21 38 10.1123/jtpe.31.1.21 Polish Children’s Perception and Understanding of Physical Education and School Sports Stanislaw H. Czyz * Abel L