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Mark S. De Carlo, Kecia E. Sell, K. Donald Shelbourne and Thomas E. Klootwyk

It is well established that intra-articular anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with autogenous bone-patellar tendon-bone graft provides satisfactory long-term stability. However, the rehabilitation programs employed following this surgical procedure have been a topic of considerable debate. This paper describes an accelerated rehabilitation protocol that is divided into four phases. The first phase encompasses the preoperative period, during which the patient will work to decrease swelling and restore range of motion and strength. The second phase involves Weeks 1 and 2 following surgery, with the patient emphasizing immediate terminal knee extension and weight bearing. The final two phases involve improving lower extremity strength and full return to daily and athletic activities. This accelerated rehabilitation protocol has resulted in an earlier return of range of motion and strength without compromising ligamentous stability.

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Yannis Theodorakis, Anastasia Beneca, Parascevi Malliou and Marios Goudas

The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of goal setting on performance and on a number of psychological variables such as self-efficacy, pretesting anxiety, and self-satisfaction during an injury rehabilitation program. An experimental group (n = 20) and a control group (n = 17) of injured physical education students were studied. Both groups underwent a 4-week quadriceps strengthening program on an isokinetic dynamometer, with the experimental group setting specific personal goals in each training session. The experimental group improved in performance significantly more than the control group. Although both groups exhibited an increase in self-efficacy and a decrease in pretesting anxiety, only the experimental group had an increase in self-satisfaction with performance. Results confirm that incorporating goal setting in the rehabilitation process enhances rehabilitation results.

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Steven Eustace, Richard Michael Page and Matt Greig

changeable through rehabilitation. A study in professional male soccer reported that only 65% of players who sustain an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury return to previous competitive levels 3 years after injury. 1 Secondary ACL injuries are also common among professional soccer players, attributed

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Leila Ahmadnezhad, Ali Yalfani and Behnam Gholami Borujeni

do not receive proper treatment; therefore, giving proper rehabilitation to these patients is essential. For these patients, rehabilitation should be directed toward increasing coordination between the activities of the local and global core muscles. 5 In general, respiratory movements in the

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Mark De Carlo, Thomas E. Klootwyk and K. Donald Shelbourne

Rehabilitation following intraarticular anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction has undergone a dramatic evolution during the last decade. This paper describes our accelerated rehabilitation program, which is divided into four phases. The preoperative phase begins immediately after injury and emphasizes control of swelling and restoration of full range of motion (ROM) and strength before surgery. Phase II, which includes the first 2 weeks after surgery, emphasizes helping the patient obtain full terminal knee extension and weight bearing. The final two phases focus on improving lower extremity strength and full return to daily and athletic activities. This accelerated program has resulted in an earlier return of ROM and strength as well as a decrease in postoperative procedures, without compromising ligamentous stability.

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Maria Grazia Benedetti, Lisa Berti, Antonio Frizziero, Donata Ferrarese and Sandro Giannini

Context:

Surface replacement of the hip is aimed especially at active patients, and it seems to achieve optimal functional results in a short time if associated with a tailored rehabilitation protocol.

Objective:

To assess the functional outcome in a group of active patients after hip resurfacing.

Design:

Clinical measurement and controlled laboratory study in a case series.

Setting:

Gait-analysis laboratory.

Participants:

8 patients and a control group of 10 subjects.

Interventions:

Patients treated with Birmingham hip-resurfacing system and a tailored rehabilitation protocol

Main Outcome Measures:

Clinical assessment (Harris Hip Score [HHS]) and instrumented gait analysis including muscular electromyographic assessment. Patients were assessed preoperatively and at 3 and 9 mo follow-up after surgery.

Results:

HHS showed a significant increase from the baseline to 3- (P = .008) and 9-month (P = .014) follow-up; 5 patients returned to sport. Gait pattern in the presented case series of patients improved substantially 3 mo postoperatively, and minimal further changes were present 9 months postoperatively. Residual abnormalities of time-distance and hip-kinematics parameters were consistent with a slow gait. A complete restoration of the muscle-activation pattern during gait was achieved.

Conclusion:

Hip resurfacing associated with a rehabilitation protocol based on the characteristics of the implant provides excellent clinical and functional outcome, especially for very active patients.

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Lynne Evans and Lew Hardy

There is an increasing awareness within the sport-related literature of the importance of psychological factors in the rehabilitation of injured athletes. This awareness and subsequent investigations have led to the proposed application of grief response models to injury. However, to date limited attention has been paid to the clinical psychology literature on grief. The purpose of this paper is to redress this oversight by providing a review of the most relevant literature on the psychological responses of injured athletes in light of the philosophical and empirical research into loss and grief in the clinical literature. As a result of this review, a number of issues are raised for future research into grief models of injury.

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Alis Bonsignore, David Field, Rebecca Speare, Lianne Dolan, Paul Oh and Daniel Santa Mina

of exercise in reducing treatment-related side effects and increasing the well-being of cancer survivors. 10 , 11 Major oncology and rehabilitation organizations have also identified the importance of incorporating exercise-based programs in comprehensive cancer care; however, access to these

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Martin J. Kelley

Rehabilitation following injury or surgery for the athlete who employs overhead motion is extremely challenging. Shoulder pathophysiology and the repetitive intense demands required during athletic activity need to be fully appreciated for successful rehabilitation. This article discusses new anatomic and biomechanical concepts that require the rehabilitation specialist to reconsider previously accepted notions. Treatment rationale is discussed based on these concepts. Rehabilitation principles and phases are described in a sequentially progressive program based on tissue reactivity and signs and symptoms.

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Barıs Seven, Gamze Cobanoglu, Deran Oskay and Nevin Atalay-Guzel

and researchers information about effectiveness of their rehabilitation protocol or helps diagnosis of various neuromuscular and somatosensorial disorders. 4 , 5 One of the frequently used methods is manual muscle testing because it is easy and fast to use in clinics. However, it is a subjective