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Maria Grazia Benedetti, Lisa Berti, Antonio Frizziero, Donata Ferrarese and Sandro Giannini

Context:

Surface replacement of the hip is aimed especially at active patients, and it seems to achieve optimal functional results in a short time if associated with a tailored rehabilitation protocol.

Objective:

To assess the functional outcome in a group of active patients after hip resurfacing.

Design:

Clinical measurement and controlled laboratory study in a case series.

Setting:

Gait-analysis laboratory.

Participants:

8 patients and a control group of 10 subjects.

Interventions:

Patients treated with Birmingham hip-resurfacing system and a tailored rehabilitation protocol

Main Outcome Measures:

Clinical assessment (Harris Hip Score [HHS]) and instrumented gait analysis including muscular electromyographic assessment. Patients were assessed preoperatively and at 3 and 9 mo follow-up after surgery.

Results:

HHS showed a significant increase from the baseline to 3- (P = .008) and 9-month (P = .014) follow-up; 5 patients returned to sport. Gait pattern in the presented case series of patients improved substantially 3 mo postoperatively, and minimal further changes were present 9 months postoperatively. Residual abnormalities of time-distance and hip-kinematics parameters were consistent with a slow gait. A complete restoration of the muscle-activation pattern during gait was achieved.

Conclusion:

Hip resurfacing associated with a rehabilitation protocol based on the characteristics of the implant provides excellent clinical and functional outcome, especially for very active patients.

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Alis Bonsignore, David Field, Rebecca Speare, Lianne Dolan, Paul Oh and Daniel Santa Mina

of exercise in reducing treatment-related side effects and increasing the well-being of cancer survivors. 10 , 11 Major oncology and rehabilitation organizations have also identified the importance of incorporating exercise-based programs in comprehensive cancer care; however, access to these

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Barry Braun

The concept that participation in exercise/physical activity reduces the risk for a host of chronic diseases is undisputed. Along with adaptations to habitual activity, each bout of exercise induces beneficial changes that last for a finite period of time, requiring subsequent exercise bouts to sustain the benefits. In this respect, exercise/physical activity is similar to other “medications” and the idea of “Exercise as Medicine” is becoming embedded in the popular lexicon. Like other medications, exercise has an optimal dose and frequency of application specific to each health outcome, as well as interactions with food and other medications. Using the prevention of type-2 diabetes as an exemplar, the application of exercise/physical activity as a medication for metabolic “rehabilitation” is considered in these terms. Some recommendations that are specific to diabetes prevention emerge, showing the process by which exercise can be prescribed to achieve health goals tailored to individual disease prevention outcomes.

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Mitchell L. Cordova, Lisa S. Jutte and J. Ty Hopkins

Many types of rehabilitation exercises are used to reestablish lower extremity neuromuscular function and strength following ankle injuries. It has not been established which exercise induces the greatest leg muscle activity, which might allow patients to recover more quickly from their injuries. The purpose of this investigation was to establish which exercises induce the most muscle activity in the medial gastrocnemius (MG), peroneus longus (PL), and tibialis anterior (TA), as measured by integrated electromyography (I-EMG). Participants (N = 24, age = 22 ± .59, mass = 63.5 ± 2.1 kg, ht = 165.7 ± 1.2 cm) conducted five repetitions of each of four exercise conditions for 30 s: one-legged stance (OLS), OLS on trampoline (OLST), T-Band kicks (TBK), and OLS perturbations (OLSP). It was found that the TBK exercise induces greater I-EMG in all three muscles, the OLST exercise stimulates more I-EMG activity in the MG and TA, and the OLSP exercise induces greater I-EMG activity in the TA.

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Hooman Minoonejad, Mohammad Karimizadeh Ardakani, Reza Rajabi, Erik A. Wikstrom and Ali Sharifnezhad

basketball players during a single-limb jump landing. This program also results in significant improvements in multiple patient-reported outcomes. These results suggest that the hop stabilization program could be implemented in the overall rehabilitation program for patients with CAI. Acknowledgments The

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Martin J. Kelley

Rehabilitation following injury or surgery for the athlete who employs overhead motion is extremely challenging. Shoulder pathophysiology and the repetitive intense demands required during athletic activity need to be fully appreciated for successful rehabilitation. This article discusses new anatomic and biomechanical concepts that require the rehabilitation specialist to reconsider previously accepted notions. Treatment rationale is discussed based on these concepts. Rehabilitation principles and phases are described in a sequentially progressive program based on tissue reactivity and signs and symptoms.

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Kellie C. Huxel Bliven and Kelsey J. Picha

It has been well over a decade since the Journal of Sport Rehabilitation published a shoulder thematic issue; thus, we are excited to highlight current research of colleagues contributing rehabilitation-focused evidence in this area. Our goal is that the compilation of articles presented here

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Doyglas R. Keskula, Jewell B. Duncan and Virginia L. Davis

This paper describes the rehabilitation of a patient following a medial meniscus transplant. Both preoperative and postoperative history and relevant physical findings are presented. Rehabilitation goals and the corresponding treatment plan are discussed, with an emphasis on functional outcomes. A general framework for treatment addressing impairment and functional goals is outlined. Progression of the rehabilitation program was based on surgical precautions and the patient's tolerance to the exercise progression. This case study demonstrates that appropriate surgical intervention combined with a properly designed rehabilitation program contributed to the improved functional abilities of this patient.

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Kyoungyoun Park, Thomas Ksiazek and Bernadette Olson

impairments and completed individualized vestibular rehabilitation therapy (VRT) demonstrated improved patient outcomes. 13 These VRT programs focused on promoting vestibular adaptation and substitution to enhance gaze and postural stability, improved vertigo, and returned patients to productive activities

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Woubeshet Ayenew, Emily C. Gathright, Ellen M. Coffey, Amber Courtney, Jodi Rogness and Andrew M. Busch

established psychiatric treatment settings may mitigate some of the access-related barriers to behavior change in SMI populations. Indeed, a behavioral intervention that connected to patients through outpatient psychiatric rehabilitation programs demonstrated promising effects on weight loss 9 and