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Stuart J. Cormack, Robert U. Newton, Michael R. McGuigan and Tim L.A. Doyle

Purpose:

To establish the reliability of various measures obtained during single and repeated countermovement jump (CMJ) performance in an elite athlete population.

Methods:

Two studies, each involving 15 elite Australian Rules Football (ARF) players were conducted where subjects performed two days, separated by one week, of AM and PM trials of either a single (CMJ1) or 5 repeated CMJ (CMJ5). Each trial was conducted on a portable force-plate. The intraday, interday, and overall typical error (TE) and coefficient of variation (CV%) were calculated for numerous variables in each jump type.

Results:

A number of CMJ1 and CMJ5 variables displayed high intraday, interday, and overall reliability. In the CMJ1 condition, mean force (CV 1.08%) was the most reliable variable. In the CMJ5, fight time and relative mean force displayed the highest repeatability with CV of 1.88% and 1.57% respectively. CMJ1Mean force was the only variable with an overall TE < smallest worthwhile change (SWC).

Conclusion:

Selected variables obtained during CMJ1 and CMJ5 performance can be used to assess the impact of both acute and chronic training and competition. Variables derived from the CMJ5 may respond differently than their CMJ1 counterparts and should provide insights into differential mechanisms of response and adaptation.

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Masahiro Yamada and Louisa D. Raisbeck

focus instruction. To investigate both aspects of a motor skill, the present study adopted a drop jump where participants were instructed to jump forward from a specific height, and then upon landing, perform a second vertical jump. For both landing quality and performance, we hypothesized that using

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Ryoko Kawakami, Yuko Gando, Kiminori Kato, Susumu S. Sawada, Haruki Momma, Motohiko Miyachi, I-Min Lee, Steven N. Blair, Minoru Tashiro, Chika Horikawa, Yasuhiro Matsubayashi, Takaho Yamada, Kazuya Fujihara and Hirohito Sone

, this prospective cohort study aimed to examine the associations of muscular and performance fitness (MPF) using 5 different tests (grip strength, vertical jump, single-leg balance, forward bending, and whole-body reaction time) that evaluate various physical fitness elements in an objective manner and

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Zeynep Hazar Kanik, Seyit Citaker, Canan Yilmaz Demirtas, Neslihan Celik Bukan, Bulent Celik and Gurkan Gunaydin

, maximal isometric quadriceps strength, vertical jump height, and blood analyses (creatine kinase [CK], lactate dehydrogenase [LDH], myoglobin, and C-reactive protein). Power analysis indicated that the required sample size to evaluate a time × group interaction (with 80% of statistical power and P  < .05

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Laura K. Fewell, Riley Nickols, Amanda Schlitzer Tierney and Cheri A. Levinson

: maximal oxygen consumption, vertical jump, grip strength, and push-ups. Body mass index was also obtained at admission and discharge. This study was approved by the Institutional Review Board at Washington University in St. Louis prior to data collection. Physical Outcome Measures Body Mass Index (BMI

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Thomas M. Newman, Giampietro L. Vairo and William E. Buckley

• Another study demonstrated a statistically significant decrease in vertical jump height. 6 • No other statistically significant findings were reported among studies comparing unbraced with braced conditions. 3 – 6 ○ The following functional performance measures were used in this CAT: Sargent Chalk Jump

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Rossana C. Nogueira, Benjamin K. Weeks and Belinda Beck

procedures provided by the manufacturer. All quantitative ultrasonometry measurements were performed by a single investigator (B.B.). Performance Measures Muscle power was determined by a maximal vertical jump test using a yardstick (Swift Performance Equipment, Brisbane, Australia). The participant was

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Revay O. Corbett, Tyler R. Keith and Jay Hertel

. Subjects then completed the CAIT, IdFAI, TSK-11, and the VAS for pain. After completing the PROs, subjects performed the following functional tasks: the weight-bearing lunge test; star excursion balance test (SEBT); up–down, lateral, and triple hop tests; the single-leg vertical jump; and Southeast

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Javier Horcajo, Borja Paredes, Guillermo Higuero, Pablo Briñol and Richard E. Petty

-statements while moving their heads, participants’ performance was assessed in three different tasks. (A vertical jump task in which jump height was computed, a squat test in which pulse rate [PR] was measured, and a deadlift task in which amount of weight in one-repetition maximum [1RM] was estimated

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Christopher A. DiCesare, Adam W. Kiefer, Scott Bonnette and Gregory D. Myer

. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine movement patterns exhibited by athletes during a jump-landing task performed as part of both a standard biomechanical assessment (ie, drop vertical jump [DVJ]) and a sport-specific VR-based assessment to examine potential differences in assessed injury