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Guadalupe Garrido, Anthony L Webster and Manuel Chamorro

The article describes a study that evaluated the adequacy of 2 different menu settings in a group of elite adolescent Spanish soccer players. Five-day food intake was assessed on 2 occasions, while athletes were consuming a flexible “buffet-style” diet (B; n = 33) and a fixed “menu-style” diet (M; n = 29). For all principal meals of the day food weighing was performed, and snacks were recorded by self-report. M provided significantly higher total energy and carbohydrate intakes than B. Breakfast and snacks both provided more energy in M. Calories obtained from fat were excessive in both settings. Calcium and vitamin D were below recommendations in B but not in M. Fiber, magnesium, folate, vitamin A, and vitamin E intake fell below recommended values in both settings. M provided significantly greater quantities of magnesium and vitamins D and E. Both feeding options were far from optimal in satisfying current scientifically based recommendations for active adolescents.

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Gustavo Monnerat, Carlos A.R. Sánchez, Caleb G.M. Santos, Dailson Paulucio, Rodolfo Velasque, Geisa P.C. Evaristo, Joseph A.M. Evaristo, Fabio C.S. Nogueira, Gilberto B. Domont, Mauricio Serrato, Antonio S. Lima, David Bishop, Antonio C. Campos de Carvalho and Fernando A.M.S. Pompeu

after exercise, showing a complex response to maximal exercise challenge ( Supplementary Table 4 [available online]). In this context, trained individuals with lower V ˙ O 2 max displayed changes in different classes of metabolites, such as amino acids, vitamins, lipids, carbohydrates, and xenobiotic

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Daniel P. Joaquim, Claudia R. Juzwiak and Ciro Winckler

should be encouraged to adjust the consumption of these food groups in order to guarantee the intake of vitamins, minerals, and other antioxidants. A high score was found for the “Meats, eggs and legumes” component for both sexes. Regarding this finding, sports guidelines recommend that athletes, among

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David C. Nieman, Giuseppe Valacchi, Laurel M. Wentz, Francesca Ferrara, Alessandra Pecorelli, Brittany Woodby, Camila A. Sakaguchi and Andrew Simonson

Grove, UT) as described in a recent study ( Nieman et al., 2018b ). The supplement ingredients (US Patent 9,839,624) included the following (in four capsules) and provided 658 mg of total monomeric flavonoids: 200-mg vitamin C (as ascorbyl palmitate), wild bilberry fruit extract with 128-mg anthocyanins

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Ellen F. Binder

This pilot study evaluated (a) the feasibility of a group exercise program in an institutionalized population with dementia; (b) the effects of such a program on physical performance measures; and (c) the potential additional effects of vitamin D supplementation on gait and muscle strength. Nursing home residents (N = 25) with chronic dementia and mobility impairments attended a thrice weekly exercise class for 8 weeks. They were randomly assigned to receive either a vitamin D supplement or no supplement throughout the program. Between-group differences in the effectiveness of the exercise intervention were analyzed. Pre-to-post changes were also assessed for both groups combined. In postexercise comparisons of both groups, knee extensor torque at 0°/sec declined by 18.6% while performance of 1-RM for hip extension increased by 16.1%. Balance also improved. Although vitamin D levels increased significantly in the supplement group, the two groups did not differ in their response to the exercise intervention.

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Robert A. Niekamp and Janine T. Baer

The purpose of this study was to determine the dietary adequacy of 12 collegiate cross-country runners during a competitive season. Four-day diet records were collected twice during the season and analyzed for total daily energy, macronutrients, vitamin A, vitamin C, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B6, folate, iron, magnesium, zinc, and calcium. Mean energy intake (3,248 ± 590 kcal) was not significantly different from estimated mean energy expenditure (3,439 ± 244 kcal). Week 8 mean prealbumin levels were within normal limits (26.8 ± 2.8 mg/dl). Mean daily CHO intake was 497 ± 134 g/day (61.2%). Three to four hours prior to competition a pre-race meal was consumed; it contained 82 ± 47 g CHO. Posteompetition CHO intake was delayed an average 2.5 hr; at that time approximately 2.6 ± 0.69 g CHO/kg body weight was consumed. The athletes appeared to demonstrate dietary adequacy with the exception of timing of posteompetition carbohydrate consumption.

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Izabella A. Ludwa, Bareket Falk, Matthew Yao, Lauren Corbett and Panagiota Klentrou

This pilot study compared bone speed of sound (SOS), bone turnover and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) between 20 Caucasian, postmenarcheal, adolescent synchronized swimmers (SS) and 20 aged- and maturity-matched nonswimmers (NS). Daily dietary intake and physical activity levels were also assessed. Bone SOS was measured by quantitative ultrasound. Blood samples were analyzed for osteocalcin, cross-linked N-teleopeptide of type I collagen (NTx), IGF-I and 25-OH vitamin D. Although no differences in bone SOS or turnover markers were observed between groups, the lower IGF-1 and vitamin D intake found in synchronized swimmers, in combination with their higher strenuous activity levels, should be further explored.

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Paula J. Ziegler, Judith A. Nelson and Satya S. Jonnalagadda

This study assessed the nutrient intake, body composition and biochemical indices of National Figure Skating Championship competitors. Four-day diet records, fasting blood samples, and anthropometric measurements were obtained 2 months after the National Championships from 41 figure skaters 11-18 years of age. Energy, carbohydrate, fat, dietary fiber and cholesterol intake were significantly lower compared to the NHANES III averages for adolescents in the U.S. In general, the mean intakes for most vitamins except vitamin D and E were above the recommended intake. But the athletes had lower intakes of vitamin E and B12, and higher intakes of vitamin C, and thiamin (females only) compared with NHANES III. The mean intakes of magnesium, zinc, and iodine by the male skaters were below the recommended levels, as were the mean intakes of calcium, iron, phosphorus, magnesium, and zinc by the female skaters. Also, the number of servings from vegetable, fruit, dairy, and meat groups were below the recommended levels. Biochemical indices of nutritional status were within normal limits for all skaters. But plasma electrolyte concentrations were indicative of potential dehydration status. The results suggest there is a need to develop dietary intervention and educational programs targeted at promoting optimal nutrient and fluid intakes by these athletes to maintain performance and improve long-term health status.

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Nancy Clark

Some of the nutritional concerns of female athletes are highlighted in this case study of a 20-year-old woman who wants to lose 16% of her body weight to qualify for the position of coxswain on a national crew team. These concerns include adequacy of vitamin, mineral, protein, and carbohydrate intake as well as amenorrhea and pathogenic eating behaviors.

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Kathe A. Gahel, Adrienne Aldous and Chad Edgington

Food and fluid intake of 2 male cyclists was assessed to describe dietary intakes of athletes participating in an endurance ride. Cyclists rode 15 to 18 hr each day for 10 days to travel 2,050 miles on the original Pony Express Trail over seven major mountain ranges. Food and fluids were weighed or measured by researchers. Average kilocalorie intake was 7,125 ± 340 (M ± SEM), or 113 kcal/kg/day. Percentages of protein, carbohydrate, and fat kilocalories were 10, 63, and 27, respectively, with 44% of the carbohydrate kilocalories from simple sugars, cookies, sweetened drinks, and candy. Vitamin and mineral intakes were two to three times the RDA for most vitamins and minerals. Total fluid intake averaged 10.5 L per day with an average of 620 ml/hr of riding time. Of fluid intake, 54% was water. Cyclists traveling long distances need a variety of high-calorie foods and ample amounts of fluids to maintain performance for this type of event.