Search Results

You are looking at 81 - 90 of 7,872 items for :

  • "activities" x
Clear All
Restricted access

Judith Godin, Joanna M. Blodgett, Kenneth Rockwood and Olga Theou

Researchers have examined the connection between different intensities of physical activity, sedentary behavior, and frailty ( Kehler et al., 2018 ). What has received less attention is that increasing time spent in one type of activity inherently means decreasing time spent in another type of

Restricted access

Kerstin Gerst Emerson and Jennifer Gay

higher prevalence of hypertension, obesity, and diabetes ( Mensah, Mokdad, Ford, Greenlund, & Croft, 2005 ). The disparity in risk factors is particularly intriguing because they are more amenable to interventions, such as increasing physical activity. Epidemiologic evidence consistently points to a

Restricted access

Buffie Longmire-Avital, Takudzwa Madzima and Elyse Bierut

-intensity physical activity or 75 min of vigorous-intensity physical activity each week. One of the most important benefits of physical activity and exercise is decreased morbidity and mortality ( Brown, Burton, & Rowan, 2007 ; Kokkinos & Myers, 2010 ). Not only does physical activity help to prevent diseases such

Restricted access

Kavita A. Gavand, Kelli L. Cain, Terry L. Conway, Brian E. Saelens, Lawrence D. Frank, Jacqueline Kerr, Karen Glanz and James F. Sallis

In adolescents, regular physical activity (PA) helps to improve body composition, cardiorespiratory and muscular fitness, metabolic health biomarkers, bone health, and mental health. 1 It is recommended that youth participate in moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) for at least 60 minutes

Restricted access

Kristen Day

urban locations, changes from active to sedentary work, mechanization of housekeeping tasks, transitions toward unhealthy “industrialized” diets, the rise of sedentary recreational activities (screen time, etc), and increased motorized transportation 5 – 8 —all may help explain this increase. Overweight

Restricted access

Gregory Knell, Henry S. Brown, Kelley P. Gabriel, Casey P. Durand, Kerem Shuval, Deborah Salvo and Harold W. Kohl III

The role of the built environment in physical activity behaviors has garnered increasing attention from the research and policy communities. 1 – 3 Modifications to the built environment, such as improvements to sidewalks, may lead to more physical activity by providing safe, defined, and connected

Restricted access

Pilar Lavielle Sotomayor, Gerardo Huitron Bravo, Analí López Fernández and Juan Talavera Piña

Increased physical activity (PA) could reduce the frequency of chronic conditions such as cardiovascular disease, breast cancer, and colon cancer by up to 10% 1 ; it can also increase life expectancy 2 and lower health care cost. 3 Therefore, promoting PA in the general population should be a

Restricted access

Junxin Li, Binbin Yang, Miranda Varrasse, Xiaopeng Ji, MaoChun Wu, Manman Li and Kun Li

contribute to older adults living a sedentary lifestyle or limiting engagement in physical activity ( Godfrey et al., 2013 ). Prior studies indicate that a sedentary lifestyle may be associated with poor sleep in older adults ( Dzierzewski et al., 2014 ; Morgan, 2003 ), and being active for 20–30 min at

Restricted access

Daniel das Virgens Chagas and Luiz Alberto Batista

percentage ( Barnett et al., 2016 ; Chagas & Batista, 2015 ; Kakebeeke et al., 2017 ) and positively associated with physical activity ( Jaakkola & Washington, 2013 ; Kambas et al., 2012 ; Laukkanen, Pesola, Havu, Sääkslahti, & Finni, 2014 ; Robinson et al., 2015 ) in both children and adolescents

Restricted access

Lisa Price, Katrina Wyatt, Jenny Lloyd, Charles Abraham, Siobhan Creanor, Sarah Dean and Melvyn Hillsdon

Understanding the prevalence of physical activity (PA) in children is important to the design of population-level health promotion initiatives. 1 It is recommended that children achieve a minimum of 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) on each day of the week 2 , 3 to