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Fernando Santos, Daniel Gould and Leisha Strachan

Research on positive youth development (PYD) through sport has provided valuable insight on how youth sport coaches’ may facilitate positive developmental outcomes such as leadership, respect, and teamwork ( Lacroix, Camiré, & Trudel, 2008 ; Trottier & Robitaille, 2014 ). Several descriptive and

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Paul G. Schempp and Sophie Woorons

Olympians pushing the limits of human performance, medical doctors discovering ways of fighting debilitating diseases, coaches finding fresh solutions to athlete development challenges—experts in every discipline make a difference in people’s daily lives. Experts are those who possess “the

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Sergio J. Ibáñez, Javier García-Rubio, Antonio Antúnez and Sebastián Feu

The importance of generating scientific knowledge is growing daily. This demand is clearly evident in sport sciences focused on the agents involved in the sport process (players, coaches, doctors, managers, public, etc.). Scientific knowledge is disseminated in many different forums and academic

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Julia Allain, Gordon A. Bloom and Wade D. Gilbert

Inspired by true stories, Hollywood films have recounted some of the most memorable sports moments, which highlighted the role of the coach during the intermissions of competition. For instance, Friday Night Lights shared the story of an American high school football team. In this movie, Coach

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Bård Erlend Solstad, Andreas Ivarsson, Ellen Merethe Haug and Yngvar Ommundsen

Grounded in Self-Determination Theory (SDT; Deci & Ryan, 2000 , 2012 ; Ryan & Deci, 2017 ), a growing body of empirical work in sport psychology has indicated that the giving of autonomy-supportive sports coaching to athletes is related to the coach’s experience of improved well-being and

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Marie Hedberg

The purpose of this article is to describe the status of coaching and coach education in Sweden. The Swedish Sport Movement can be traced to the distinctive cultural and political characteristics that exist in Sweden and in other Scandinavian countries. The typical Swedish coach has been described as a collectivist, having a high work ethic and believing strongly in the importance of the group (Birkinshaw & Crainer, 2002). They build their coaching on what are traditionally considered female values, have a high-risk tolerance and there is often a lack of hierarchy in the coach-athlete relationship. Most coaching is done on a voluntary basis and the different Sport federations design and deliver coach education. There is no standard or uniform coach education regarding content, structure and costs. In addition, the quality of coach education in Sweden has not been assessed. Although many coaches recognize the importance of learning from other coaches, research has found that coaches in Sweden are seldom prepared to reflect and to think critically (Fahlström, Glemne, Hageskog, Kenttä, & Linnér, 2013; Hedberg, 2014).

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Travis Crickard, Diane M. Culver and Cassandra M. Seguin

Coach development has been described as the process through which coach learning occurs. This process encompasses formal, nonformal, and informal learning situations that lead to enhanced coaching skills and expertise ( Mallett, Trudel, Lyle, & Rynne, 2009 ; Trudel, Culver, & Werthner, 2013 ). How

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Isabel Mesquita, Joana Ribeiro, Sofia Santos and Kevin Morgan

The aim of this study was to analyze Portuguese expert coaches’ conceptions of learning sources that promote long-term coach development and the extent to which these sources are currently present in coach education programs. Six expert coaches were individually interviewed, using a semistructured format and the interviews were analyzed using QSR N6 Nudist software. The results highlighted the participants’ awareness of the uniqueness of coach education, emphasizing the importance of reflecting and engaging with a variety of learning experiences. Findings also revealed dissatisfaction with the current dominant education framework in Portugal, which remains excessively didactic and classroom-orientated. In contrast, the participants externalized a constructivist approach for coach education assuming the need for theoretical knowledge to be framed in practical contexts, where they have the opportunity to share and reflect their own and others’ experiences to develop learning. Such a position echoes Sfard’s acquisition and participation learning metaphors.

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Göran Kenttä, Marte Bentzen, Kristen Dieffenbach and Peter Olusoga

High-performance (HP) coaching is a demanding profession that challenges mental health and sustainability in the profession ( Didymus, 2017 ). Coaches face constant pressure related to performance expectations, along with the perennial threat of negative consequences such as funding cuts and job

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Lynn Kidman and David Keelty

The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of coaching and coach development in New Zealand. For a small country with a population of 4.47 million (Statistics New Zealand, 2015), New Zealand achieves great success on the world sporting stage. One of the many contributors to this success is New Zealand’s commitment to developing coaches with an emphasis on continuous improvement through the provision of ongoing learning opportunities for coaches (SPARC, 2006). Interestingly the International Sport Coaching Framework’s recommendations aligns itself to such an emphasis that they refer to as lifelong learning (ICCE, 2013). To achieve this focus, and based on a Ministerial Taskforce findings that, “Coaching is in urgent need of support and development” (Ministerial Taskforce, 2001, p.10) Sport and Recreation New Zealand (SPARC) established a consultancy group to review and redevelop coaching. An outcome of this consultation was the production of the New Zealand Coaching Strategy (SPARC, 2004). Based on robust discussion on many issues of how people learn and coaching development philosophies, the Coach Development Framework (CDF) was established in 2006. Since its establishment, the CDF has been guiding coach development in New Zealand, placing the responsibility for this development on the National Sporting Organisations (NSOs).