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Kaisu Marjut Kaikkonen, Raija irmeli Korpelainen, Mikko P. Tulppo, Hannu Sakari Kaikkonen, Marja Liisa Vanhala, Mika Antero Kallio, Sirkka M. Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi and Juha Tapani Korpelainen

Background:

Autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysfunction and obesity are intrinsically related to each other. In normal-weight subjects physical activity (PA) and fitness are related to cardiovascular autonomic regulation, providing evidence that aerobic training may improve ANS functioning measured by heart rate variability (HRV). The goal of this study was to investigate the association between lifetime PA, aerobic fitness and HRV in obese adults.

Methods:

Participants included 107 (87 females) volunteers (mean age 44.5 years, median BMI 35.7) who completed health and lifestyle questionnaires and measurements of maximal aerobic performance, anthropometry and 24 h HRV.

Results:

In the multivariate linear regression analyses, lifetime physical activity explained 40% of the variance in normal R-R intervals (SDNN). Each 1-category increase in the activity index increased SDNN by 15.4 (P = .009) and 24% of the variance in natural logarithmic value of ultra-low frequency power (P = .050). High measured VO2max explained 45% of the variance in natural logarithmic value of high-frequency power (P = .009) and 25% of the variance in low frequency/high frequency ratio (P < .001).

Conclusions:

Lifetime physical activity and aerobic fitness may reduce obesity-related health risks by improving the cardiac autonomic function measured by HRV in obese workingage subjects. This research supports the role of lifetime physical activity in weight management strategies and interventions to reduce obesity-related health risks.

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Paul D. Loprinzi and Ovuokerie Addoh

Background:

This study evaluated a physical activity–related obesity model on mortality.

Methods:

Data from the 1999–2006 NHANES were used (N = 16,077), with follow-up through 2011. Physical activity (PA) was subjectively assessed, with body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) objectively measured. From these, 12 mutually exclusive groups (G) were evaluated, including: G1: Normal BMI, Normal WC and Active; G2: Normal BMI, Normal WC and Inactive; G3: Normal BMI, High WC and Active; G4: Normal BMI, High WC and Inactive; G5: Overweight BMI, Normal WC and Active; G6: Overweight BMI, Normal WC and Inactive; G7: Overweight BMI, High WC and Active; G8: Overweight BMI, High WC and Inactive; G9: Obese BMI, Normal WC and Active; G10: Obese BMI, Normal WC and Inactive; G11: Obese BMI, High WC and Active; and G12: Obese BMI, High WC and Inactive.

Results:

Compared with G2, the following had a reduced mortality risk: G1, G3, G5, G6, G7, G8, G9, and G11. Compared with G12, the following had a reduced mortality risk: G1, G3, G5, G7, G9, and G11. In each respective group for BMI and WC, the active group had a reduced mortality risk.

Conclusions:

Across all BMI and WC combinations, PA improved mortality risk identification.

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Verity Cleland, Michael Schmidt, Jo Salmon, Terry Dywer and Alison Venn

Background:

We investigated associations of total sedentary behavior (SB) and objectively-measured and self-reported physical activity (PA) with obesity.

Methods:

Data from 1662 adults (26–36 years) included daily steps, self-reported PA, sitting, and waist circumference. SB and PA were dichotomized at the median, then 2 variables created (SB/self-reported PA; SB/objectively-measured PA) each with 4 categories: low SB/high PA (reference group), high SB/high PA, low SB/low PA, high SB/low PA.

Results:

Overall, high SB/low PA was associated with 95 –168% increased obesity odds. Associations were stronger and more consistent for steps than self-reported PA for men (OR 2.68, 95% CI 1.36–5.32 and OR 1.95, 95% CI 1.01–3.79, respectively) and women (OR 2.66, 95% CI 1.58–4.49 and OR 2.00, 95% CI 1.21–3.31, respectively). Among men, obesity was higher when daily steps were low, irrespective of sitting (low SB/low steps OR 2.07, 95% CI 1.03–4.17; high SB/low steps OR 2.68, 95% CI 1.36–5.32).

Conclusions:

High sitting and low activity increased obesity odds among adults. Irrespective of sitting, men with low step counts had increased odds of obesity. The findings highlight the importance of engaging in physical activity and limiting sitting.

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Tony Reybrouck, Joseph Vinckx and Marc Gewillig

This study analyzes whether cardiorespiratory exercise performance is impaired in obese children when parameters of aerobic exercise function are used that are independent of body mass. Twenty-one obese patients (mean age 11.6 ± 2.5 years) were studied and compared with 22 normal controls of the same age range (11.4 ± 2.2 years; p = .78). All participants underwent square wave exercise testing on a treadmill for 6 min (speed 5 km/hr, inclination 4%). The oxygen deficit, calculated as ml·min·kg−1, was expressed as a percentage of the total oxygen cost for the 6-min exercise bout (also expressed as ml·min·kg−1). Oxygen deficit amounted to 7.2 ± 1.9% in the obese patients and was not significantly different (p = .25) from the normal controls (6.6 ± 1.1%). The similar values for O2 deficit in obese patients compared with normal controls shows that cardiovascular fitness in obese patients is normal when parameters of aerobic exercise function are not normalized per kg of body mass.

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Kaori Ishii, Ai Shibata, Minoru Adachi, Yoshiyuki Mano and Koichiro Oka

Background:

Sedentary behaviors (SB) are associated with health indicators; however, there are currently very few studies that have examined these associations, especially in conjunction with psychological factors, in children. The current study examined the independent relationship between objectively assessed SB, and indicators of obesity and psychological well-being, among Japanese children.

Methods:

A total of 967 elementary-school children completed a cross-sectional survey. SB was measured with accelerometers for 7 consecutive days. Psychological well-being data (eg, anxiety and behavior problems) were collected via a self-report questionnaire. To determine the relationship of SB with degree of obesity and psychological well-being, linear regression analyses were conducted to relate the indicators of obesity and psychological well-being on SB, adjusted by gender, grade, percentage of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity per day, duration spent wearing the accelerometer, and degree of obesity.

Results:

SB was significantly related to behavioral/emotional problems (β = .280, P = .010, R 2 = .015). There was a statistically significant relationship between SB and anxiety (β = .206, P = .059, R 2 = .007). No significant association with degree of obesity was found.

Conclusions:

Excess SB relates higher levels of behavioral/emotional problems and anxiety. These results can inspire the development of interventions that promote well-being and enhance psychological health, by focusing on SB in Japanese children.

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J. Dru Marshall and Marcel Bouffard

The purposes of the study were to determine if there is a difference in gross motor skill movement competencies between obese and nonobese children; whether Quality Daily Physical Education (QDPE) programs facilitated the development of movement skill in obese children; and whether there is an association between aerobic fitness level and motor performance results. A 2 Sex (male, female) × 2 Group (obese, nonobese) × 2 Age Categories (Grade 1, Grade 4) × 2 Program (QDPE, non-QDPE) completely randomized factorial design was used. Movement competency (Test of Gross Motor Development (TGMD)) and aerobic fitness (20 m shuttle run test) were assessed in 100 age-, sex-, and school-matched obese and nonobese pairs. A significant three-way interaction of Program × Group × Sex was found for the TGMD total score, suggesting that QDPE programs facilitate the development of gross motor skills in those children who are less movement competent to begin with, regardless of their obesity status. Correlations showed that aerobic fitness level was predictive of the TGMD scores. This study provides evidence in support of QDPE programs.

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Rikki A. Cannioto

Despite much research investigating physical activity (PA) barriers for American women, the PA barriers experienced by overweight and obese working women remain largely unexamined. This preliminary investigation assessed the PA barriers, behaviors, and beliefs of 40 overweight/obese women with full-time desk jobs for the subsequent development and implementation of a tailored “healthy weight” wellness program. Based on qualitative and quantitative data analysis, the majority of participants weren’t sufficiently active, citing motivation and time as their biggest perceived barriers. Statistically significant relationships were identified between BMI and barrier numbers, PA levels, PA enjoyment, and PA importance; as well as between PA levels and barrier numbers, PA enjoyment, and PA importance. An effective PA intervention should emphasize 300 minutes of PA a week, while incorporating evidence-based behavioral strategies (i.e., goal setting, self-monitoring, contingency management, social support, stimulus control, and cognitive restructuring) that have been proven to decrease barriers and increase PA adherence among overweight and obese individuals.

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Kerem Shuval, Tammy Leonard, James Murdoch, Margaret O. Caughy, Harold W. Kohl III and Celette Sugg Skinner

Background:

Numerous studies have documented adverse health effects from prolonged sitting and TV viewing. These sedentary pastimes are linked to increased risk for obesity and other cardiometabolic risk factors. No studies, however, have examined these associations specifically in low-income, minority communities in the US.

Methods:

This cross-sectional, community-based study was conducted in South Dallas, TX. Multivariable ordered logistic regression models were used to examine the association between sedentary behaviors (self-report) and measures of objectively assessed obesity (BMI, waist circumference).

Results:

Among a low-income, ethnic-minority population, there were independent and significant associations between higher levels of sitting time, computer use, and transit time with elevated BMI (P < .05). Elevated waist circumference was also linked to increased sitting time, computer use, and transit time, yet without statistical significance.

Conclusions:

Increased time spent in passive-leisure activities is a risk marker for obesity in this population.

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Jacob Edward Barkley, Sarah-Jeanne Salvy, Gabriel J. Sanders, Shounak Dey, Kyle-Patrick Von Carlowitz and Megan L. Williamson

Background:

There is evidence that the presence of a friend increases physical activity behavior in schoolaged children (≥ 8 years old) and in young adolescents. Little is known about the developmental trajectory of the effects of peer influences on children’s physical activity. Therefore, we sought to test the effect of the presence versus absence of a friend on physical activity in young children (≤ 6 years old).

Methods:

Physical activity was assessed, via accelerometery, in 3- to 6-year-old children, during 2 social conditions: alone and in the presence of a friend. During each condition, children were taken to a gymnasium and had free access to physical and sedentary activities for 30 minutes. In one condition children were tested alone (solo play), whereas in the other they were tested in the presence of a friend who had access to the same activities.

Results:

Children exhibited 54% greater (P < .02) average accelerometer counts during the friend condition (mean = 2629, SD = 1080 or 5.7 METs) than during the solo play condition (mean = 1707, SD = 1009 or 4.5 METs).

Conclusions:

The presence of a friend contributes to increased physical activity behavior in young children.

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Dan Nemet

Citation Musalek M, Kokstejn J, Papez P, Scheffler C, Mumm R, Czernitzki AF, Koziel S. Impact of normal-weight obesity on fundamental motor skills in pre-school children aged 3 to 6 years. Anthropol Anz . 2017;74(3):203–12. doi: 10.1127/anthranz/2017/0752 Normal-weight obesity (NWO) is defined as