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Bonnie L. Parkhouse

The current status of undergraduate and graduate curricula in sport management was examined in 83 institutions identified as offering sport management programs in the United States (40 undergraduate, 32 graduate, and 11 programs at both levels). Since only two Canadian institutions responded to this inquiry, definitive conclusions could not be drawn about the current status of sport management in Canada. However, several observations about them are made on the basis of external data. The findings of this study clearly indicate that sport management curricula varies markedly from one institution to another. In most cases the institution claims to have a program in sport management per se, but in reality course offerings are not sufficient to warrant even a minor or concentration in this area. Implications of current practices in sport management are discussed, and recommendations for future development are presented.

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Lawrence W. Fielding, Brenda G. Pitts and Lori K. Miller

This paper explores concepts about educational quality, accreditation, and assessment as they relate to sport management programs. It reports, analyzes, and synthesizes the results of a survey sent to teaching professionals associated with sport management programs. Accreditation and its alternatives are discussed in addition to the issue of professional responsibility for ensuring educational quality. Levels and degrees of professional responsibility are considered.

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Meg G. Hancock and T. Christopher Greenwell

Higher education administrators have called on faculty to strategize ways in which to fill classroom seats, as well as recruit and retain diverse students. Understanding current student populations should be of increasing importance to sport management faculty as new programs are established at colleges and universities each year. A sample of 330 sport management students from introductory sport management courses at six different schools was surveyed to identify factors influencing their selection of a sport management major. Results indicate students select the sport management major because they have an interest in sport and working in the sport industry. Program quality and program convenience were also important selection factors. Women had lower salary perceptions and minority students had lower perceptions across most selection factors. Understanding these factors can help programs tailor their marketing and recruiting efforts in an effort to develop a more diverse classroom and workforce.

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Katie Lebel, Karen Danylchuk and Patti Millar

This research explored the use of social media within the sport management discipline in a North American context, specifically investigating how sport management academicians use social media as a teaching and learning tool. An online survey garnered the social media literacies of sport management faculty (N = 132). Compared with cross-discipline studies that have measured similar interests, sport management faculty appear to have a limited awareness of social media applications. Only 61% of study participants reported having incorporated social media into their course design. While a majority of faculty agreed that the use of social media in education can provide positive enhancement to both teaching and learning, in practice, participant social media teaching strategies were narrowly employed. Results suggest a potential disconnect between the digital pedagogies currently employed by sport management faculty, the expectations of students, and most importantly, the demands of the sport industry.

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Daniel F. Mahony

Although sport management is now well established in higher education and is an increasingly popular major for students, there are a number of critical issues that face the discipline. The purpose of this lecture is to identify some of these critical issues and what can be done to address each of them. The primary issue for sport management is a lack of qualified faculty to (a) teach the increasing number of students enrolling in sport management programs and (b) conduct the research necessary to build a distinct body of knowledge. In addition, sport management faculty also need to work together to make a better case for the contributions of their programs to their respective universities to avoid being a very low priority in their home units. The lecture focuses on the need for sport management faculty to work together to address each of these issues.

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David Pierce and James Johnson

environment profiles that are used to match an individual’s score on a personality profile to best-fit occupations, sport management is not identified in Holland-related publications because it is not a specific occupation. The broad nature of sport management, with its varied occupational disciplines

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Angela Lumpkin

sequential and interrelated stages recommended in this pedagogical innovation essay. Teachers need to adopt effective questioning strategies to actively engage students, challenge them to think more critically, and ensure student-centered learning ( Nilson, 2010 ). Practical Applications Sport management

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Gonzalo A. Bravo, Doyeon Won and Mauricio Ferreira

Trade-offs in consumer choice become central to understanding how choice actually occurs. This study examines the trade-offs sport management students are willing to make in order to select the program of their choice. Sport management undergraduate students (N = 498) participated in a full-profile conjoint experiment asking them to rate 18 program-choice scenarios resulted from the factorial design of seven attributes and nineteen levels. Results at the aggregated level indicated that program environment was the most important attribute in choosing a sport management graduate program, followed by program reputation, graduate assistantship, cost/tuition, NCAA affiliation, program length, and location. Given these results, a sensitivity analysis illustrated that students were willing to make trade-offs among program characteristics, particularly pay more for a program with better reputation. Results from the current study are valuable and informative for sport management programs for setting market boundaries and selecting what to promote when advertising to attract prospective students.

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Gordon A. Olafson

Although concern for the lack of empirically based research and for the types of methodologies used continues, few if any sport management articles have quantified the extent of such criticism. Selected volumes of the Academy of Management Journal, Administrative Science Quarterly, Journal of Applied Psychology, Canadian Journal of Applied Sport Sciences, Dissertation Abstracts, Journal of Sport Management, and Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport were content analyzed employing 13 dimensions to determine, on a comparative basis, the patterns of research design in organizational studies and sport management research. Based upon this analysis, sport management researchers should explore the variety of methods and analyses evident in the organizational studies literature. The basis for these results and suggestions for change are discussed.

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Standards for Curriculum and Voluntary Accreditation of Sport Management Education Programs

NASPE-NASSM Joint Task Force on Sport Management Curriculum and Accreditation

The sport business industry is among the largest industries in the United States. Sport management is the field of study offering the specialized training and education necessary for individuals seeking careers in any of the many segments of the industry. An increasing number of institutions offer sport management programs. Concern over the lack of an identified and recognized base of common knowledge for sport management resulted in the development of the NASPE-NASSM Joint Task Force on Sport Management Curriculum and Accreditation. The task force developed a competency-based minimum body of knowledge needed for baccalaureate, master's, and doctoral levels. The work resulted from study of curricular research and consultation with academicians, practitioners, and professional associations. The final document was approved as standards by professionals in June 1992.