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Thomas Curran and Andrew P. Hill

Bulletin, 31 , 218 – 231 . PubMed ID: 15619594 doi:10.1177/0146167204271420 10.1177/0146167204271420 Mosewich , A.D. , Crocker , P.R. , Kowalski , K.C. , & DeLongis , A. ( 2013 ). Applying self-compassion in sport: An intervention with women athletes . Journal of Sport and Exercise

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Christina A. Geithner, Claire E. Molenaar, Tommy Henriksson, Anncristine Fjellman-Wiklund and Kajsa Gilenstam

). Age of menarche and menstruation characteristics of Puerto Rican women athletes . Puerto Rico Health Sciences Journal, 9 ( 2 ), 179 – 183 . PubMed ID: 2077556 Schorer , J. , Baker , J. , Büsch , D. , Wilhelm , A. , & Pabst , J. ( 2009 ). Relative age, talent identification and youth

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Kari Stefansen, Gerd Marie Solstad, Åse Strandbu and Maria Hansen

-9566.2012.01458.x Fasting , K. , & Brackenridge , C. ( 2005 ). The grooming process in sport: Case studies of sexual harassment and abuse . Auto/Biography, 13 ( 1 ): 33 – 52 . doi:10.1191/0967550705ab016oa Fasting , K. , Brackenridge , C. , & Walseth , K. ( 2007 ). Women athletes’ personal responses

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Adele Pavlidis, Millicent Kennelly and Laura Rodriguez Castro

.J. ( 2015 ). Gendering Olympians: Olympic media guide profiles of men and women athletes . Sociology of Sport Journal, 32 ( 3 ), 312 – 331 . doi: 10.1123/ssj.2013-0123 Chalip , L. ( 2014 ). From legacy to leverage . In J. Grix (Ed.), Leveraging legacies from sports mega-events: Concepts and

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D. Enette Larson-Meyer, Kathleen Woolf and Louise Burke

-composition analysis in women athletes . Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 55 ( 2 ), 153 – 160 . doi:10.1080/02701367.1984.10608392 10.1080/02701367.1984.10608392 Stewart , A. , Marfell-Jones , M. , Olds , T. , & de Ridder , H. ( 2011 ). International standards for anthropometric assessment

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Calvin Nite and Marvin Washington

, how sport institutions attempt to address and incorporate LGBQT concerns in sport, cultural sensitive issues such as mascot names and dress (can women athletes wear hijabs or not), or the appropriate use of social media. Future research could look at how institutional actors work to address issues

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Daniel Gould

sport participation for girls worldwide by providing models of highly successful women athletes. Youth sport has also seen increases in adult involvement. For example, most longtime observers of youth sport have noted an increasing number of parents attending all of their child’s practices and games and

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Leticia Oseguera, Dan Merson, C. Keith Harrison and Sue Rankin

women college athletes at Division III reporting greater gains in general education than college athletes at Division I or II schools. Relative to the general student body, women athletes performed comparably to women non-athletes while men college athletes reported greater gains than their non

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Nikolaus A. Dean

.1123/ssj.11.2.175 10.1123/ssj.11.2.175 Young , K. , & White , P. ( 1995 ). Sport, physical danger, and injury: The experiences of elite women athletes . Journal of Sport & Social Issues, 19 ( 1 ), 45 – 61 . doi:10.1177/019372395019001004 10.1177/019372395019001004 Zavattaro , S. ( 2014

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Elizabeth M. Mullin, James E. Leone and Suzanne Pottratz

, self-acceptance, and normalization of lesbian and bisexual identities as key reasons for women athletes. The perception that women’s athletics was associated with lesbian sexual orientations added to a sense of safety. Players also identified the importance of trailblazers, or individuals who had come