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Terttu Parkatti, Jarmo Perttunen and Phyllis Wacker

This study examined the effects of an instructed structured Nordic walking (NW) exercise program on the functional capacity of older sedentary people. Volunteers were randomly assigned to an NW group (68.2 ± 3.8 yr old) or control group (69.9 ± 3.0 yr old). Before and at the end of the 9-wk intervention, functional tests and 2-dimensional ground-reaction-force (GRF) patterns of normal (1.40 m/s) and fast (1.94 m/s) walking speeds were measured. The intervention included a 60-min supervised NW session on an inside track twice a week for 9 wk. The mean changes in functional tests differed between groups significantly. Gait analyses showed no significant differences between the groups on any GRF parameters for walking speed either before or after the intervention. The study showed that NW has favorable effects on functional capacity in older people and is a suitable form of exercise for them.

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Geraldine H. Van Gym, Howard A. Wenger and Catherine A. Gaul

This study investigated the effect of engaging in imagery in conjunction with nonspecific training on the transfer of the training to performance. Forty subjects were pretested on a Wingate cycle ergometer test for peak power and a 40-m sprint. Subjects were assigned to one of four groups: imagery training (IT), power training (PT), imagery and power training (DPT), and control (C). Following a 6-week training period, all subjects were retested. Although a MANOVA revealed no significant difference between groups on any variable, the groups-by-time interaction was significant. Therefore an analysis of difference scores on both tests was performed. This analysis revealed that although both the IPT and the PT group significantly improved in peak power, only the IPT group improved significantly on the sprint. The results indicate that imagery coupled with nonspecific training contributes to the enhancement of subsequent performance significantly better than does nonspecific training alone.

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Bernard Auvinet, Gilles Berrut, Claude Touzard, Laurent Moutel, Nadine Collet, Denis Chaleil and Eric Barrey

The objective of this study was to measure gait abnormalities in elderly fallers with the Locometrix™ gait-analysis system. This accelerometric device provided the following gait variables: walking speed and stride frequency, length, symmetry, and regularity. The variables were analyzed over a 20-s period of stable walking on a flat track of 40 m. Participants were 20 elderly patients hospitalized for falls (mean age 80.8 ± 5.0 years) and 33 older adults living at home (mean age 77.2 ± 6.5 years). All gait variables were found to be significantly lower in the faller group (p < .05). The lower gait speed, stride length, and stride frequency were previously recognized as nonrelevant in predicting the risk of falling, whereas lower stride symmetry was related to an underlying pathology and lower stride regularity was correlated to the risk of falls. The Locometrix appears to be well suited to measure gait regularity in routine practice.

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Marilia Silva Paulo, Javaid Nauman, Abdishakur Abdulle, Abdulla Aljunaibi, Mouza Alzaabi, Caroline Barakat-Haddad, Mohamud Sheek-Hussein, Syed Mahboob Shah, Susan Yousufzai and Tom Loney

- In 2016, 40% (M 49%; F 32%) of UAE adolescents aged 13–17 years met the screen time recommendations 7 (≤2 h/d) and this declined from ages 13–15 years (total 45%; M 52%; F 37%) to ages 16–17 years (total 34%; M 43%; F 25%). 3 A greater proportion of Emirati children met the screen time

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David Silva, Ronaldo Gabriel, Helena Moreira, João Abrantes and Aurélio Faria

184 ± 72 94 ± 101 148 ± 67 66 ± 93 M2 122 ± 49 90 ± 51 102 ± 37 85 ± 57 115 ± 48 35 ± 44 99 ± 35 35 ± 54 M3 90 ± 48 62 ± 45 82 ± 38 57 ± 35 90 ± 41 23 ± 49 78 ± 33 23 ± 43 M4 94 ± 53 60 ± 45 75 ± 42 44 ± 33 84 ± 35 17 ± 40 73 ± 39 17 ± 40 M5 140 ± 73 100 ± 76 92 ± 47 58 ± 53 109 ± 51 25 ± 51 86 ± 56

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Erin Smith, Tara Cusack, Caitriona Cunningham and Catherine Blake

slowest mean single-task walking speed reported in the study by Trombetti as 1.03 m/s ( Trombetti et al., 2011 ), and the fastest in the studies by Gillain et al. ( 2009 ) and Maquet et al. ( 2010 ), at 1.40 m/s. One problem associated with examining the effect of dual task on gait is that different dual

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Lisa E. Bolger, Linda A. Bolger, Cian O’Neill, Edward Coughlan, Wesley O’Brien, Seán Lacey and Con Burns

km run. At the end of the challenge (five weeks), each child received a final score card showing their initial and final run times. Paper Rush: Children ran around a marked loop (approx. 40m) in the school yard/hall for a set time e.g., 1 min/2 min/3 min. At opposite sides of the loop were two boxes

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Wonseok Jang, Yong Jae Ko, Daniel L. Wann and Daehwan Kim

 = 19) reported similar levels of suspense ( M winning = 5.43; M losing = 5.93, F (1, 17) = .58, p  = .46), engagement ( M winning = 5.40; M losing = 5.81, F (1, 17) = .48, p  = .50), enjoyment ( M winning = 5.60; M losing = 5.78, F (1, 17) = .08, p  = .78), and arousal ( M winning = 5.40