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Jacqueline D. Goodway and Mary E. Rudisill

This study examined the relationship between perceived physical competence and actual motor skill competence in African American preschool children at risk of school failure and/or developmental delay (N = 59). A secondary purpose was to determine gender differences and the accuracy of self-perceptions. All children completed a perceived physical competence subscale (Harter & Pike, 1984). Actual motor skill competence was measured by Ulrich’s (1985) Test of Gross Motor Development (TGMD), resulting in three scores (locomotor, object-control, and TGMD-Total). Stepwise regression analysis revealed that locomotor competence (p = .99) and gender (p = .81) did not predict perceived physical competence, but object-control competence (p = .01) did significantly predict perceived physical competence. Adding gender to this regression model did not significantly predict perceived physical competence (p = .69). These findings showed that these children are not accurate at perceiving their physical competence.

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Jacqueline D. Goodway and Mary E. Rudisill

This study was conducted to determine the influence of a motor skill intervention (MSI) program on the perceived competence and social acceptance of African American preschoolers who are at risk of school failure/developmental delay. Two groups of preschoolers enrolled in a compensatory prekindergarten program participated in a 12-week intervention. The motor skill intervention (MSI) group received an MSI program, while the control group (C) received the regular prekindergarten program. All children completed Harter’s Pictorial Scale of Perceived Competence and Social Acceptance prior to and following the 12-week program. The results indicated that all children, regardless of group, reported high perceived physical and cognitive competence and high perceived maternal and peer acceptance. Additionally, the MSI group reported significantly higher perceived physical competence scores after receiving the MSI program. The MSI group also reported higher perceived physical competence than the C group on postintervention scores. No gender differences were found. It was concluded that perceived competence and social acceptance were enhanced by participation in an MSI program.

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Sheriece Sadberry and Michael Mobley

Research has shown that African American college students have a difficult time adjusting at predominately White institutions (PWIs) in comparison with historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) with regard to both general and race-related stressors (Neville, Heppner, Ji, & Thye, 2004; Prillerman, Myers, & Smedley, 1989; Sedlacek, 1999). For college student-athletes, the campus environment can challenge their capacity to ft in and adhere to academic and social expectations, perhaps especially for Black student-athletes (BSA). The current study therefore examined the sociocultural and mental health adjustment of 98 BSA based on their perceived social support, perceived campus racial climate, team cohesion, and life events using latent profle analysis (LPA). Results indicated three distinct profile groups: Low Social Support/Cohesion, High Minority Stress, and High Social Support/Cohesion. Profiles were predictive of adjustment concerns and campus setting (PWIs vs. HBCUs), highlighting within-group differences among BSA. Implications for interventions to facilitate and support healthy adjustment and success for BSA are discussed.

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Miranda Brunett and René Revis Shingles

spoke Spanish, and 93.3% had some CC training 417 patients who speak Hebrew (56.4% women, 38.1% men, and 5.5% unknown) and 90 physicians (27.8% women, 71.1% men, and 1.1% unknown) in outpatient clinic in Israel 26 PCPs (mean age = 43.6 y, 42% white, 27% African American 31% other, and 65% female) from

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Bailey Peck, Timothy Renzi, Hannah Peach, Jane Gaultney and Joseph S. Marino

. The e-mail invitation was sent up to 3 times to qualified athletes who had not yet responded. Table 1 Descriptive Data for Entire Sample and Separately by Sport Football Track N 21 19 Self-reported black/African American 33% (7/21) 58% (11/19) Age, y 20.57 (1.08) 20.53 (1.22) Time to fall asleep a

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Jesse C. Christensen, Caitlin J. Miller, Ryan D. Burns and Hugh S. West

Repair Characteristics Total patients (n = 332) Age, y 31.2 (11.8) Sex, %male 58 Race, n (%)  White 297 (93.8)  Black or African American 2 (0.6)  Asian 3 (1.0)  Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander 5 (1.5)  American Indian or Alaska Native 1 (0.3)  Patient declined/unknown 24 (7.2) Marital status, n

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Jonathan S. Goodwin, Robert A. Creighton, Brian G. Pietrosimone, Jeffery T. Spang and J. Troy Blackburn

involvement in tibiofemoral osteoarthritis in men and women and in whites and African Americans . Arthritis Care Res . 2012 ; 64 ( 6 ): 847 – 852 . PubMed ID: 22238208 doi:10.1002/acr.21606 10.1002/acr.21606 8. Costa CR , Morrison WB , Carrino JA . Medial meniscus extrusion on knee MRI: is extent

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Tomohiro Yasuda

.1056/NEJM199503023320902 3. Stump TE , Clark DO , Johnson RJ , Wolinsky FD . The structure of health status among Hispanic, African American, and white older adults . J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci . 1997 ; 52 : 49 – 60 . PubMed ID: 9215357 doi:10.1093/geronb/52B.Special_Issue.49 10

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Harsh H. Buddhadev, Daniel L. Crisafulli, David N. Suprak and Jun G. San Juan

participants for the study. The authors have no conflicts of interest to disclose. References 1. Jordan JM , Helmick CG , Renner JB , et al . Prevalence of knee symptoms and radiographic and symptomatic knee osteoarthritis in African Americans and Caucasians: the Johnston County Osteoarthritis

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Anat V. Lubetzky, Bryan D. Hujsak, Gene Fu and Ken Perlin

Remaining did not report 75% White 6% Asian American 6% African American 6% Hispanic Remaining did not report   Exercise Yes/no 93% yes 81% yes   Minutes of weekly exercise Mean = 227 min ( SD  = 159) Mean = 249 min ( SD  = 283) .54 Hours of sitting per day Mean = 8 hr ( SD  = 3.8) Mean = 6 hr ( SD  = 2