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Jacqueline D. Goodway and Mary E. Rudisill

This study examined the relationship between perceived physical competence and actual motor skill competence in African American preschool children at risk of school failure and/or developmental delay (N = 59). A secondary purpose was to determine gender differences and the accuracy of self-perceptions. All children completed a perceived physical competence subscale (Harter & Pike, 1984). Actual motor skill competence was measured by Ulrich’s (1985) Test of Gross Motor Development (TGMD), resulting in three scores (locomotor, object-control, and TGMD-Total). Stepwise regression analysis revealed that locomotor competence (p = .99) and gender (p = .81) did not predict perceived physical competence, but object-control competence (p = .01) did significantly predict perceived physical competence. Adding gender to this regression model did not significantly predict perceived physical competence (p = .69). These findings showed that these children are not accurate at perceiving their physical competence.

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Jacqueline D. Goodway and Mary E. Rudisill

This study was conducted to determine the influence of a motor skill intervention (MSI) program on the perceived competence and social acceptance of African American preschoolers who are at risk of school failure/developmental delay. Two groups of preschoolers enrolled in a compensatory prekindergarten program participated in a 12-week intervention. The motor skill intervention (MSI) group received an MSI program, while the control group (C) received the regular prekindergarten program. All children completed Harter’s Pictorial Scale of Perceived Competence and Social Acceptance prior to and following the 12-week program. The results indicated that all children, regardless of group, reported high perceived physical and cognitive competence and high perceived maternal and peer acceptance. Additionally, the MSI group reported significantly higher perceived physical competence scores after receiving the MSI program. The MSI group also reported higher perceived physical competence than the C group on postintervention scores. No gender differences were found. It was concluded that perceived competence and social acceptance were enhanced by participation in an MSI program.

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Emma V. Richardson, Sarah Blaylock, Elizabeth Barstow, Matthew Fifolt and Robert W. Motl

and 72 years with an average age of 50 years. One was Jamaican American, eight were African American, and 23 were White. All participants had relapsing remitting MS with duration of disease ranging between less than 1 year and 47 years. Participants were representative of three states and various

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Xihe Zhu and Justin A. Haegele

between those with and without visual impairment. For children with visual impairments, their vision classifications were 36.5% B1, 22.7% B2, and 40.9% B3, respectively. Each family shared the same racial/ethnic makeup, including 18 families identifying as White, two as African American, one as Hispanic

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Ali Brian, Sally Taunton, Chelsee Shortt, Adam Pennell and Ryan Sacko

). Our participants for this secondary data analysis (African-American = 65.2%, White = 1.4%, Hispanic = 24.6%, and Asian = 1.4%) included children ages 3–5 years ( M age = 4.6, SD  = 0.51; girls = 32, boys = 27). The current sample included children with disabilities ( n  = 28, 42%) and without

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Justin A. Haegele and T. Nicole Kirk

Framework: Intersectionality The concept of intersectionality was developed by African American feminists during the 1970s and 1980s who challenged mainstream feminists to think about how being a woman, and the oppression that came with being a woman, might “intersect” with being African American, and

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Alice M. Buchanan, Benjamin Miedema and Georgia C. Frey

PA participation sites. Fleury and Lee ( 2006 ) emphasized the importance of neighborhood design, including sidewalks and streetlights, as being important to African American women’s participation in PA. Likewise, such design was important to the participants in this study, as without safe sidewalks

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Wesley J. Wilson and K. Andrew R. Richards

White PETE, Disability Studies Yes 1 2016–2017 Peter 23 Male White PETE, APE, Conflict Studies Yes 0 2016–2017 Bonnie 24 Female African American Kinesiology, Sports Medicine No 0 2016–2017 Katelyn 23 Female White Health and Exercise Science No 0 2016–2017 Leonard 23 Male Asian PETE Yes 0 2016–2017 Tori

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Justin A. Haegele, Samuel R. Hodge, Xihe Zhu, Steven K. Holland and Wesley J. Wilson

participants, six self-identified their race and/or ethnicity as European American, two as Asian American, one as African American, and one as Middle Eastern/White. All participants had congenital visual impairments. Seven participants experienced physical education exclusively in integrated settings, whereas

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Hyokju Maeng, E. Kipling Webster, E. Andrew Pitchford and Dale A. Ulrich

relative balance to the sample by sex (60% male, 40% female) and race (70% White, 30% African American). Informed consent was obtained from a parent or legal caregiver of each child for the child’s participation in the study as well as permission to digitally record the child’s performance. In addition