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Lauren E. Gyllenhammer, Amanda K. Vanni, Courtney E. Byrd-Williams, Marc Kalan, Leslie Bernstein and Jaimie N. Davis

Background:

Lifetime physical activity (PA) is associated with decreased breast cancer (BC) risk; reports suggest that PA during adolescence contributes strongly to this relationship. PA lowers production of sex hormones, specifically estradiol, or decreases insulin resistance (IR), thereby lowering risk. Overweight Latina adolescents are insulin resistant and exhibit low levels of PA, potentially increasing their future BC risk.

Methods:

37 obese Latina adolescents (15.7 ± 1.1 yrs) provided measures of PA using accelerometry; plasma follicular phase estradiol, sex-hormone binding globulin, total and free testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (DHEAS); IR using HOMA-IR; and body composition via DEXA. Partial correlations and stepwise linear regressions assessed cross-sectional relationships between sex hormones, IR and PA. Body composition, and age were included a priori as covariates.

Results:

Estradiol was negatively associated with accelerometer counts per minute (CPM; r = −0.4; P = .02), percent time spent in moderate PA (%MPA; r = −0.5; P = .006), and percent time in moderate or vigorous PA (%MVPA; r = −0.5; P = .007). DHEAS was positively associated with CPM (r = .4, P = .009), %MPA (r = .3, P = .04), and %MVPA (r = .3, P = .04). Other sex hormones and IR were not associated with PA measures.

Conclusion:

This study is the first to show that higher habitual PA was inversely associated with estradiol in obese adolescents.

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Farah A. Ramirez-Marrero, John Miles, Michael J. Joyner and Timothy B. Curry

Background:

This study aimed to 1) describe physical activity (PA) in 15 post gastric bypass surgery (GB), 16 obese (Ob), and 14 lean (L) participants (mean ± se: age = 37.1 ± 1.6, 30.8 ± 1.9, 32.7 ± 2.3 yrs.; BMI = 29.7 ± 1.2, 38.2 ± 0.8, 22.9 ± 0.5 kg/m2, respectively); and 2) test associations between PA, body composition, and cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2max).

Methods:

Participants completed a PA questionnaire after wearing accelerometers from 5–7 days. Body composition was determined with DEXA and CT scans, and VO2max with open circuit spirometry. ANOVA was used to detect differences between groups, and linear regressions to evaluate associations between PA (self-reported, accelerometer), body composition, and VO2max.

Results:

Self-reported moderate to vigorous PA (MVPA) in GB, Ob, and L participants was 497.7 ± 215.9, 988.6 ± 230.8, and 770.7 ± 249.3 min/week, respectively (P = .51); accelerometer MVPA was 185.9 ± 41.7, 132.3 ± 51.1, and 322.2 ± 51.1 min/week, respectively (P = .03); and steps/day were 6647 ± 141, 6603 ± 377, and 9591 ± 377, respectively (P = .03). Ob showed a marginally higher difference between self-report and accelerometer MVPA (P = .06). Accelerometer-MVPA and steps/day were inversely associated with percent fat (r = –0.53, –0.46), and abdominal fat (r = –0.36, –0.40), and directly associated with VO2max (r = .36).

Conclusions:

PA was similar between GB and Ob participants, and both were less active than L. Higher MVPA was associated with higher VO2max and lower body fat.

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Meltem Dizdar, Jale Fatma Irdesel, Oguzhan Sıtkı Dizdar and Mine Topsaç

 = weight/square of height kg/m 2 ), and duration of OP diagnosis were collected. Patients were also questioned in terms of OP risk factors, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA), fracture risk (Fracture Risk Assessment Tool [FRAX]), history and frequency of falls, use of drugs known to increase fall risk

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Megan Colletto and Nancy Rodriguez

to the nearest cm using a stadiometer, and body weight was measured in the morning, before breakfast, using a portable digital scale to the nearest 0.1 lb (Health-O-Meter Inc., Model 349KLX, Bridgeview, IL). Body composition was measured using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) (DPX

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Brett D. Tarca, Thomas P. Wycherley, Paul Bennett, Anthony Meade and Katia E. Ferrar

of body composition by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) . Clin Physiol . 1991 ; 11 ( 4 ): 331 – 341 . PubMed ID: 1914437 doi:10.1111/j.1475-097X.1991.tb00662.x 1914437 10.1111/j.1475-097X.1991.tb00662.x 83. Mitsiopoulos N , Baumgartner RN , Heymsfield SB , Lyons W , Gallagher D

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Kleverton Krinski, Daniel G. S. Machado, Luciana S. Lirani, Sergio G. DaSilva, Eduardo C. Costa, Sarah J. Hardcastle and Hassan M. Elsangedy

weight divided by height squared (kg/m 2 ). Body composition was determined using a whole-body DEXA scanner (DPX-IQ; Lunar Corp., Madison, WI). Instruction Protocol The participants were familiarized with the Borg RPE Scale, the Feeling Scale (FS), the Felt Arousal Scale (FAS), the Attention Scale, as