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Denise Jennings, Stuart Cormack, Aaron J. Coutts, Luke J. Boyd and Robert J. Aughey

Purpose:

To examine the difference in distance measured by two global positioning system (GPS) units of the same model worn by the same player while performing movements common to team sports.

Methods:

Twenty elite Australian football players completed two trials of the straight line movement (10, 20, 40 m) at four speeds (walk, jog, stride, sprint), two trials of the changes of direction (COD) courses of two different frequencies (gradual and tight), and five trials of a team sport running simulation circuit. To assess inter-unit variability for total and high intensity running (HIR) distance measured in matches, data from eight field players were collected in three Australian Hockey League (AHL) matches during the 2009 season. Each subject wore two GPS devices (MinimaxX v2.5, Catapult, Australia) that collected position data at 5 Hz for each movement and match trial. The percentage difference ±90% confidence interval (CI) was used to determine differences between units.

Results:

Differences (±90% CI) between the units ranged from 9.9 ± 4.7% to 11.9 ± 19.5% for straight line running movements and from 9.5 ± 7.2% to 10.7 ± 7.9% in the COD courses. Similar results were exhibited in the team sport circuit (11.1 ± 4.2%). Total distance (10.3 ± 6.2%) and HIR distance (10.3 ± 15.6) measured during the match play displayed similar variability.

Conclusion:

It is recommended that players wear the same GPS unit for each exercise session to reduce measurement error. The level of between-unit measurement error should be considered when comparing results from players wearing different GPS units.

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Chelsea Steel, Carolina Bejarano and Jordan A. Carlson

Concurrent use of multiple person-worn sensors, such as combining data from Global Positioning Systems (GPS) trackers and accelerometers, is becoming more common in field-based physical activity research. The use of GPS trackers combined with accelerometers has been particularly useful in the

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Kosuke Tamura, Jeffrey S. Wilson, Robin C. Puett, David B. Klenosky, William A. Harper and Philip J. Troped

accelerometers and global positioning system (GPS) units can be used to quantify PA occurring on trails and thereby provide a better understanding of how community trails can support regular PA. 23 , 24 To date, researchers have concurrently used these devices to objectively assess how much PA occurs at home

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Matt Greig, Hannah Emmerson and John McCreadie

Global Positioning System (GPS) technology offer potential to quantify mechanical loading during functional rehabilitative tasks. Recently, mediolateral loading imbalances were highlighted in a case study of ankle sprain injury in elite male soccer. 11 However, to enhance the clinical application of GPS

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Mathieu Lacome, Ben Simpson, Nick Broad and Martin Buchheit

-based external load measures (ie, locomotor activity during small-sided games [SSG]) tracked with global positioning system (GPS) and an objective measure of internal load (ie, HR response to the same drills) in 10 elite soccer players. The second aim was to examine the ability of each individual model to

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Robert J. Aughey

Global positioning system (GPS) technology was made possible after the invention of the atomic clock. The first suggestion that GPS could be used to assess the physical activity of humans followed some 40 y later. There was a rapid uptake of GPS technology, with the literature concentrating on validation studies and the measurement of steady-state movement. The first attempts were made to validate GPS for field sport applications in 2006. While GPS has been validated for applications for team sports, some doubts continue to exist on the appropriateness of GPS for measuring short high-velocity movements. Thus, GPS has been applied extensively in Australian football, cricket, hockey, rugby union and league, and soccer. There is extensive information on the activity profile of athletes from field sports in the literature stemming from GPS, and this includes total distance covered by players and distance in velocity bands. Global positioning systems have also been applied to detect fatigue in matches, identify periods of most intense play, different activity profiles by position, competition level, and sport. More recent research has integrated GPS data with the physical capacity or fitness test score of athletes, game-specific tasks, or tactical or strategic information. The future of GPS analysis will involve further miniaturization of devices, longer battery life, and integration of other inertial sensor data to more effectively quantify the effort of athletes.

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Martin Buchheit, Mathieu Lacome, Yannick Cholley and Ben Michael Simpson

measurement of stride variables in the field, using global positioning system (GPS)–embedded accelerometers. 9 This approach allows run-based vertical stiffness, which has been shown to be affected by lower-leg muscle fatigue, 10 , 11 to be tracked during any type of runs; maximal efforts are therefore no

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Levi Frehlich, Christine Friedenreich, Alberto Nettel-Aguirre, Jasper Schipperijn and Gavin R. McCormack

measure of geographical location. Recent studies have captured location specific physical activity through the use of Global Position Systems (GPS) monitors usually linked via time stamp with accelerometer data ( Jansen et al., 2018 ; Troped, Wilson, Matthews, Cromley, & Melly, 2010 ). GPS linked

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Andrew D. Govus, Aaron Coutts, Rob Duffield, Andrew Murray and Hugh Fullagar

rate and blood lactate) and external-load measures derived from microtechnologies such as global positioning systems (GPS) and accelerometers. 3 – 5 Consequently, s-RPE training load is used extensively alongside GPS-derived metrics of training load (such as player load and total distance run) in

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Heidi R. Thornton, André R. Nelson, Jace A. Delaney, Fabio R. Serpiello and Grant M. Duthie

Global positioning systems (GPS) are commonly used in team sports to quantify the movement patterns of athletes during training and competition. 1 GPS devices can provide a large number of movement variables including distance, speed, acceleration/deceleration, and metabolic power. 1 , 2 By