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Megan S. Patterson, M. Renée Umstattd Meyer and Jill M. Beville

Background:

Due to numerous health benefits, national recommendations call Americans to participate in muscle-strengthening activities at least 2 days/week. However, college-aged women tend to fall short of recommendations. This study sought to examine correlates of college women meeting strength training recommendations using the Integrated Behavioral Model (IBM).

Methods:

Undergraduate women (n = 421) completed surveys measuring strength training, demographics, and IBM constructs. Descriptive, bivariate, and multivariate analyses were conducted using SPSS 19.

Results:

Respondents were on average 20.1 years old, 79.3% were white, and 66.3% did not meet strength training recommendations. Bivariate correlations revealed significant relationships (P ≤ .01) between strength training and attitude, descriptive norms, perceived behavioral control, self-efficacy, intention, and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. A logistic regression model revealed self-efficacy, intention, and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity were predictive of college women meeting U.S. strength training recommendations.

Conclusions:

This study supports using the IBM to understand strength training behavior among college women. Further research is needed to better understand mediating effects among IBM constructs.

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Lisa Groshong, Sonja A. Wilhelm Stanis, Andrew T. Kaczynski, J. Aaron Hipp and Gina M. Besenyi

Background:

Public parks hold promise for promoting population-level PA, but studies show a significant portion of park use is sedentary. Past research has documented the effectiveness of message-based strategies for influencing diverse behaviors in park settings and for increasing PA in nonpark contexts. Therefore, to inform message-based interventions (eg, point-ofdecision prompts) to increase park-based PA, the purpose of this study was to elicit insights about key attitudes, perceived norms, and personal agency that affect park use and park-based PA in low-income urban neighborhoods.

Methods:

This study used 6 focus groups with youth and adults (n = 41) from low-income urban areas in Kansas City, MO, to examine perceptions of key attitudinal outcomes and motivations, perceived norms, key referents, and personal agency facilitators and constraints that affect park use and park-based PA.

Results:

Participant attitudes reflected the importance of parks for mental and physical health, with social interaction and solitude cited as key motivations. Of 10 themes regarding perceived norms, influential others reflected participants’ ethnic makeup but little consensus emerged among groups. Social and safety themes were cited as both facilitators and constraints, along with park offerings and setting.

Conclusions:

Information about attitudes, perceived norms, and personal agency can increase understanding of theoretically derived factors that influence park-based PA and help park and health professionals create communication strategies to promote PA.

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Recommendations: Application of the Integrated Behavioral Model Megan S. Patterson * M. Renée Umstattd Meyer * Jill M. Beville * 7 2015 12 7 998 1004 10.1123/jpah.2014-0026 Association Between Knowledge and Practice in the Field of Physical Activity and Health: A Population-Based Study Thiago T. Borges

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Rebecca Stanley, Rachel Jones, Christian Swann, Hayley Christian, Julie Sherring, Trevor Shilton and Anthony Okely

acceptance of the Movement Guidelines among all stakeholders; however, views relating to usability and dissemination varied between stakeholder groups. The general acceptance of the integrated behavior model from all stakeholders was similar to that reported by the stakeholder consultations for the Canadian

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Justin Kompf

. Potential predictors of college women meeting strength training recommendations: application of the integrated behavioral model . J Phys Act Health . 2015 ; 12 ( 7 ): 998 – 1004 . PubMed ID: 25156045 doi:10.1123/jpah.2014-0026 25156045 10.1123/jpah.2014-0026 54. Phillips LA , Johnson MA

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René van Bavel, Gabriele Esposito, Tom Baranowski and Néstor Duch-Brown

. ( 2015 ). Theory of reasoned action, theory of planned behavior, and the integrated behavioral model . In K. Glanz , B.K. Rimer , & K. Viswanath , (Eds.), Health behavior: Theory, research and practice . San Francisco, CA : Jossey-Bass . Perugini , M. , & Bagozzi , R.P. ( 2001 ). The role of

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Jennifer P. Agans, Oliver W.A. Wilson and Melissa Bopp

, Turner LW , Jackson JC , Lian BE . Gender differences in college leisure time physical activity: application of the theory of planned behavior and integrated behavioral model . J Am Coll Health . 2014 ; 62 ( 3 ): 173 – 184 . PubMed ID: 24328906 doi:10.1080/07448481.2013.872648 10

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Jemima C. John, Shreela V. Sharma, Deanna Hoelscher, Michael D. Swartz and Chuck Huber

, Turner L , Jackson J , Lian B . Gender differences in college leisure time physical activity: application of the theory of planned behavior and integrated behavioral model . J Am Coll Health . 2014 ; 62 ( 3 ): 173 – 184 . PubMed ID: 24328906 doi:10.1080/07448481.2013.872648 10