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Aaron Beacom, Liam French and Scott Kendall

This study, which examines key features of contemporary media representations of disabled athletes in the context of the Paralympic Games, engages with established literature on representations of disability to critically interpret recent trends in journalistic inquiry. The analysis of media coverage of the 2012 and 2014 Paralympic Games identifies salient themes concerning the representation of disability. This, along with an investigation of documentary evidence concerning attempts by key stakeholders including the International Paralympic Committee to influence the nature of representation, contributes to an interrogation of the disability narrative emerging from the Paralympic Games and a consideration of the extent to which media coverage has shifted significantly from previous representations of disability.

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Jo Ann M. Buysse and Bria Borcherding

DePauw’s (1997) theoretical construct of sport and how we view the body focuses on three socially constructed ideals of physicality, masculinity, and sexuality. Those who do not fit into these ideals are marginalized when it comes to sport participation and media coverage. In this study the authors examined photographs from 12 print newspapers in five countries during the 2008 Paralympic Games in Beijing to determine how Paralympic athletes were treated. They examined the number of photographs and the content of each to determine whether athletes with disabilities are portrayed as tokens who are marginalized or treated as elite athletes. The findings support DePauw’s construct and point to gender and disability differences and hierarchy in print-media photographs.

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Ik Young Chang, Jane Crossman, Jane Taylor and Diane Walker

This study compared and explored the textual coverage of the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games (OG) and Paralympic Games (PG) by the Canadian newspaper The Globe and Mail. The authors found 8 high-order themes and 25 low-order themes for the OG. The high-order themes were predicting game results, reporting game results, athleticism, politics, ethical issues, nationalism, the media, and the economy. For the PG, there were 4 high-order themes, and each high-order theme had 1 low-order theme. The high-order themes were reporting game results, athleticism, ethical issues, and equality between Paralympians and Olympians. Comparisons between OG and PG coverage are discussed and recommendations for future research provided.

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Laura Misener, Simon Darcy, David Legg and Keith Gilbert

Over the last decade a great deal of work has examined major sport event legacies and event leverage. Much of this work has involved Olympic studies and this paper seeks to add to the body of knowledge surrounding major sport event legacies by examining the largely overlooked area of the Paralympic Games. The Paralympic Games are the second largest multisport event after the Olympic Games depending upon which parameters are used and since Sydney 2000 there has been an ‘operational partnership’ where bid cities are required to host both Games. Yet, few studies have evaluated the comparative outcomes, legacies and event leverage that Paralympic games have generated. This paper addresses this absence by conducting a thematic analysis of Paralympic legacy research. The thematic analysis used a combination of keywords involving event legacy across 13 major academic databases. Of the 43 articles identified as having Paralympic legacy related content only 13 articles empirically investigated Paralympic legacy. In reviewing the research, it is noted that the bulk of the research has focused on Summer Paralympic Games with little interest in the Winter Paralympic Games. The major findings for legacy-based research include: infrastructure; sport; information education, and awareness; human capital; and managerial changes. However, while these findings may seem congruent with major event legacies frameworks conceptually, an examination of the detailed findings shows that Paralympic legacy research is isomorphic and adds a new component to existing legacy dimensions.

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Mathew Dowling and Jimmy Smith

This investigation examined how Own the Podium (OTP) has contributed to the ongoing development of highperformance sport in Canada. In adopting an institutional work perspective, we contend that OTP’s continuance has not been the sole product of Canada’s success at the Olympic and Paralympic Games or lobbying efforts to secure additional funding. Rather, OTP’s permanence can also be explained as the by-product of the activities and actions of OTP itself and its supporting stakeholders to embed and institutionalize both the organization specifically and high-performance sport more generally in the Canadian sport landscape. In short, OTP’s continued existence can, in part, be explained by ongoing institutional work. To support our contentions, we draw on and analyze documentation that was either produced by, or significant to the development of, OTP. Our analysis identifies a number of OTP-related practices (e.g., tiering, hiring of high-performance advisors, and the creation and support of new high-performance sport programs) that have further institutionalized OTP and the norms, routines, and practices associated with high-performance sport. More broadly, our investigation draws attention to the importance of individual and collective actors in shaping institutional settings in sport.

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Kim Gammage, Rachel Arnold, Nicole Bolter, Angela Coppola, Thomas Curran, Lori Dithurbide, Karl Erickson, Larkin Lamarche, Sean Locke, Luc Martin and Kathleen Wilson

Invictus Games. To date, much of what we know from mass media images of parasport come from the Paralympic Games; thus, the present study sought to significantly extend current knowledge on media images of parasport by exploring the British Broadcasting Corporation coverage of the Invictus Games with

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Jamile S. Codogno, Henrique L. Monteiro, Bruna C. Turi-Lynch, Romulo A. Fernandes, Subhash Pokhrel and Nana Anokye

. , Kissick , J. , Stomphorst , J. , . . . Webborn , N. ( 2016 ). The road to Rio: Medical and scientific perspectives on the 2016 Paralympic Games . PM & R : The Journal of Injury, Function, and Rehabilitation, 8 ( 8 ), 798 – 801 . PubMed ID: 31774628 doi: 10.1016/j.pmrj.2016.07.004 Chief

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Andrew G. Wood, Jamie B. Barker, Martin Turner and Peter Thomson

cardiac output by Finometer in patients with cirrhosis . Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, 30 , 230 – 233 . doi:10.1111/j.1475-097X.2010.00932.x 10.1111/j.1475-097X.2010.00932.x Legg , D. , & Steadward , R. ( 2011 ). The Paralympic Games and 60 years of change (1948–2008): Unification

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Julia Allain, Gordon A. Bloom and Wade D. Gilbert

– 16 . doi:10.1123/iscj.2013-0008 10.1123/iscj.2013-0008 Ritchie , D. , & Allen , J. ( 2015 ). ‘Let them get on with it’: Coaches’ perceptions of their roles and coaching practices during Olympic and Paralympic Games . International Sport Coaching Journal, 2 , 108 – 124 . doi:10.1123/iscj.2014

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Lea-Cathrin Dohme, David Piggott, Susan Backhouse and Gareth Morgan

Paralympics Games . London, UK : Department of Health . Weinberg , R. , Butt , J. , & Culp , B. ( 2011 ). Coaches’ views of mental toughness and how it is built . International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 9, 156 – 172 . doi:10.1080/1612197X.2011.567106 10.1080/1612197X.2011