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Sherry L. Pagoto, Kristin L. Schneider, Jessica Oleski, Brian Smith and Michael Bauman

Background:

The present feasibility study describes engagement and spread of a Twitter-based core-strengthening challenge.

Methods:

A challenge that entailed completing a core-strengthening exercise using a hashtag (#PlankADay) was circulated via Twitter. This study surveyed users who joined during the first 2 months of the challenge to describe their characteristics, including social support for exercise and to what extent they invited others to join. The study continued to track total users for 10 months.

Results:

Of 407 individuals who joined in the first 2 months, 105 completed surveys. Among these, 81% were female and 86% white and mean age was 35.8. 72% participated for at least 1 month and 47% participated for at least 2 months. Survey participants reported that the challenge increased their enjoyment of abdominal exercise. Of the 68% of participants who invited others to participate, 28% recruited none, 66% recruited 1–5 users, and 6% recruited 10 or more users. Participants reported that online friends provided as much positive social support for exercise as family and in-person friends. In 14 months, 4941 users produced 76,746 tweets and mean total tweets per user was 15.86 (SD = 75.34; range = 1–2888).

Conclusion:

Online social networks may be a promising mechanism to spread brief exercise behaviors.

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Brian A. Eiler, Rosemary Al-Kire, Patrick C. Doyle and Heidi A. Wayment

accounts with disclosures of sexual violence from the general population on Twitter during the height of the #MeToo movement. While this strategy may not be ideal, we use this comparison to inform additional analyses that further unpack athletes’ experiences of sexual abuse perpetrated by a powerful

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Robert Medairos, Vicky Kang, Carissa Aboubakare, Matthew Kramer and Sheila Ann Dugan

Background:

This study aims to identify patterns of use and preferences related to technology platforms that could support physical activity (PA) programs in an underserved population.

Methods:

A 29-item questionnaire was administered at 5 health and wellness sites targeting low income communities in Chicago. Frequency tables were generated for Internet, cell phone, and social media use and preferences. Chi-squared analysis was used to evaluate differences across age and income groups.

Results:

A total of 291 individuals participated and were predominantly female (69.0%). Majority reported incomes less than $30,000 (72.9%) and identified as African American/Black/Caribbean (49.3%) or Mexican/Mexican American (34.3%). Most participants regularly used smartphones (63.2%) and the Internet (75.9%). Respondents frequently used Facebook (84.8%), and less commonly used Instagram (43.6%), and Twitter (20.0%). Free Internet-based exercise programs were the most preferred method to increase PA levels (31.6%), while some respondents (21.0%) thought none of the surveyed technology applications would help.

Conclusion:

Cell phone, Internet, and social media use is common among the surveyed underserved population. Technology preferences to increase PA levels varied, with a considerable number of respondents not preferring the surveyed technology platforms. Creating educational opportunities to increase awareness may maximize the effectiveness of technology-based PA interventions.

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Brigid M. Lynch, Andrea Ramirez Varela and Terry Boyle

, where members can contribute to discussion and debate about causal inference methods via Twitter. Members will be provided with a copy of a scientific article 2 weeks prior to the event and some initial discussion points. A date and time for the Twitter journal club (with unique hashtag) will also be

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Rachel Arnold, Nicole Bolter, Lori Dithurbide, Karl Erickson, Blair Evans, Larkin Lamarche, Sean Locke, Eric Martin and Kathleen Wilson

Edited by Kim Gammage

: https://www.sc.edu/study/colleges_schools/public_health/faculty-staff/saunders_ruth.php Does Your Hashtag Matter? Comparing the Fitspiration and Thinspiration Communities on Twitter Research has shown a relationship between general social networking use and body image and eating concerns. Thinspiration

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Stephen S. Cheung

, Wada K , Smith DR , Endo S , Fukushima T . Preventing heat illness in the anticipated hot climate of the Tokyo 2020 Summer Olympic Games . Environ Health Prev Med . 2017 ; 22 : 68 . PubMed ID: 29165162 doi:10.1186/s12199-017-0675-y 10.1186/s12199-017-0675-y 29165162 2. Twitter

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Franco M. Impellizzeri

Over the past 10 years, the technological innovation affecting the way science and scientific findings are most often communicated is undoubtedly social media such as Facebook® and Twitter®. The popularity of some researchers has been boosted more by social media than the science itself

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Israel Halperin

Twitter and Facebook, and they develop working models to improve the embedment of research in high-performance sport. 1 On the other hand, a growing number of peer-reviewed journals include key points, study highlights, video abstracts, and practical applications sections. Despite this important progress

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Artur Direito, Joseph J. Murphy, Matthew Mclaughlin, Jacqueline Mair, Kelly Mackenzie, Masamitsu Kamada, Rachel Sutherland, Shannon Montgomery, Trevor Shilton and on behalf of the ISPAH Early Career Network

decisions. Public opinion may have a powerful impact on policy decisions. • Mobilizing professional consensus for advocacy actions through conferences, webinars, electronic direct mail, journals, websites and other “owned media,” Twitter, LinkedIn, and other relevant platforms. • Undertaking training to

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Lindsay T. Starling and Michael I. Lambert

study and a link to the questionnaire were posted on the South African Rugby Union website and Twitter page and were included in the Team Handbook given to the 20 teams competing in the 2016 Gold Cup competition. Teams in this competition were the highest placed nonuniversity club teams in the 2015