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Diana Marina Camargo, Paula Camila Ramírez, Vanesa Quiroga, Paola Ríos, Rogério César Férmino and Olga L. Sarmiento

environmental resources for physical activity (PA) promotion among different community groups. Thus, the physical and social aspect of parks may have a potential to become a relevant intervention in the reduction of NCDs and their risk factors in the population. 5 Recent evidence has shown that the efforts to

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Karin I. Proper, Ester Cerin and Neville Owen

Background:

There is an inverse relationship between individual socio-economic status (SES) and amount of occupational physical activity. The role of the socio-economic environment is, however, less clear. This study examined the independent influences of neighborhood and individual SES on absolute and relative amount of occupational physical activity. It also examined the moderating effects of neighborhood SES on the relationship between individual SES and occupational physical activity.

Methods:

Employees (n = 1236) resident in high or low SES neighborhoods were assessed on socio-demographic factors, including educational attainment and household income, and physical activity.

Results:

Neighborhood SES and individual SES were independently inversely related to absolute and relative amount of occupational physical activity. Significant interactions between neighborhood SES and level of educational attainment in the contribution of total and vigorous occupational physical activity to total physical activity were found.

Conclusions:

Neighborhood SES can function as a moderator in the relationship between individual SES and occupational physical activity.

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Anna-Eva Prick, Jacomine de Lange, Erik Scherder, Jos Twisk and Anne Margriet Pot

interventions, including physical activity interventions, are therefore promising alternatives ( Kirk-Sanchez & McGough, 2014 ; Sofi et al., 2011 ): ‘physical activity’ includes body movement that contracts muscles to burn more calories than a body would normally do so just to exist at rest ( Chodzko-Zajko et

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Tim Takken, Nynke de Jong and on behalf of the Dutch Physical Activity Report Card Study Group

Introduction National surveillance data in the Netherlands show that the percentage of children and youth, who meet the Dutch physical activity guidelines has decreased significantly between 2006 and 2014. 1 Data from the 2016 Dutch Physical Activity Report Card showed that only a minority of

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Marcella Burghard, Karlijn Knitel, Iris van Oost, Mark S. Tremblay, Tim Takken and the Dutch Physical Activity Report Card Study Group

Background:

The Active Healthy Kids the Netherlands (AHKN) Report Card consolidates and translates research and assesses how the Netherlands is being responsible in providing physical activity (PA) opportunities for children and youth (<18 years). The primary aim of this article is to summarize the results of the 2016 AHKN Report Card.

Methods:

Nine indicators were graded using the Active Healthy Kids Global Alliance report card development process, which includes a synthesis of the best available research, surveillance, policy and practice findings, and expert consensus.

Results:

Grades assigned were: Overall Physical Activity Levels, D; Organized Sport Participation, B; Active Play, B; Active Transportation, A; Sedentary Behaviors, C; Family and Peers, B; School, C; Community and the Built Environment, A; Government Strategies and Investments, INC.

Conclusions:

Sedentary behavior and overall PA levels are not meeting current guidelines. However, the Dutch youth behaviors in sports, active transportation, and active play are satisfactory. Several modifiable factors of influence might be enhanced to improve these indicators or at least prevent regression. Although Dutch children accumulate a lot of daily PA through cycling, it is not enough to meet the current national PA guidelines of 60 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous PA per day.

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Leslie A. Pruitt, Abby C. King, Eva Obarzanek, Michael Miller, Mary O’Toole, William L. Haskell, Laura Fast, Sheila Reynolds and for the Activity Counseling Trial Research Group

Background:

Physical activity recall (PAR) reliability was estimated in a three-site sample of African American and white adults. The sample was sedentary at baseline and more varied in physical activity 24 months later. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were used to estimate the number of PAR assessments necessary to obtain a reliability of 0.70 at both timepoints.

Methods:

The PAR was administered ≤ 30 d apart at baseline (n = 547) and 24 months (n = 648). Energy expenditure ICC was calculated by race, gender, and age.

Results:

Baseline reliability was low for all groups with 4–16 PARs estimated to attain reliable data. ICCs at 24 months were similar (ICC = 0.54–0.55) for race and age group, with 2–3 PARs estimated to reach acceptable reliability. At 24 months, women were more reliable reporters than men.

Conclusion:

Low sample variability in activity reduced reliability, highlighting the importance of evaluating diverse groups. Despite evaluating a sample with greater physical activity variability, an estimated 2–3 PARs were necessary to obtain acceptable reliability.

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Kenneth E. Powell and Steven N. Blair

Nearly 25 years ago, Jeremy Morris ( 1994 ) declared physical activity to be the “best buy in public health.” Morris, the epidemiologist credited with publishing the first modern scientific evidence of the cardiovascular health benefits of physical activity ( Morris, Heady, Raffle, Roberts, & Parks

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MinKyoung Song, Robert F. Corwyn, Robert H. Bradley and Julie C. Lumeng

Childhood obesity continues to be an epidemic. 1 , 2 Given that low levels of physical activity increase the risk for obesity, 3 , 4 the importance of physical activity among youth cannot be overemphasized. 5 , 6 Unfortunately, despite increased efforts to promote physical activity levels by

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Karin A. Pfeiffer and Michael J. Wierenga

Physical inactivity is a recognized independent risk factor for mortality and chronic morbidity in adults ( Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Committee, 2018 ). Specific to the U.S. context, physical inactivity is estimated on average to cause 11% of premature mortality and 7% of disease burden

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Meredith C. Peddie, Matthew Reeves, Millie K. Keown, Tracy L. Perry and C. Murray Skeaff

factor profile than those whose total sedentary and physically active time is the same, but whose sedentary time is accumulated in shorter bouts, frequently interrupted with activity ( Healy et al., 2008 ; Healy, Matthews, Dunstan, Winkler, & Owen, 2011 ). Indeed, experimental evidence now indicates