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  • Psychology and Behavior in Sport/Exercise x
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Elaine M. Murtagh, Colin Boreham, Alan Nevill, Gareth Davison, Tom Trinick, Ellie Duly, Mawloud El-Agnaf and Marie H. Murphy

Background:

Markers of inflammation are emerging as novel indices of cardiovascular risk. These markers have been shown to alter acutely after intense exercise; however, the effects of more moderate intensity exercise in healthy individuals is not known. Walking forms a cornerstone of physical activity promotion, so the inflammatory response to this exercise merits investigation. This study evaluated the effects of a 45-min walk on C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin 6 (IL-6), in sedentary, overweight men.

Methods:

Fifteen men (49.7 ± 5.9 y) walked for 45 min at 60 to 70% of predicted maximum heart rate. Fasted blood samples were taken prior to and immediately 1 hr and 24 h post-walk.

Results:

IL-6 decreased from 1 h post-walk to 24 h post-walk (P < 0.01). No significant changes were observed in CRP.

Conclusions:

These findings suggest that 45 min walking at 60 to 70% HRmax-p causes a decrease in IL-6 24 h post-exercise, but does not evoke a significant response in CRP levels.

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Simon Walker, Fabrizio Santolamazza, William Kraemer and Keijo Häkkinen

The present study investigated changes in acute serum hormone responses to a resistance exercise bout following a prolonged period of hypertrophic resistance training in young (YM) and older men (OM). Subjects performed a 5 × 10RM leg press exercise protocol before and after 20 weeks of hypertrophic resistance training. In YM, the acute responses in growth hormone were greater compared with before training (p < .05), and cortisol concentration did not increase after training. Endocrine responses in OM were similar before and after training. Greater acute growth hormone responses after training were associated with larger gains in lean mass in the entire subject group (r = .596, p = .019). These findings suggest that, in general, YM demonstrate greater adaptability within the endocrine system compared with OM. However, adaptability in growth hormone response was associated with larger training-induced gains independent of age.

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Marcos R. Kunzler, Emmanuel S. da Rocha, Maarten F. Bobbert, Jacques Duysens and Felipe P. Carpes

Background:

In negotiating stairs, low foot clearance increases the risk of tripping and a fall. Foot clearance may be related to physical fitness, which differs between active and sedentary participants, and be acutely affected by exercise. Impaired stair negotiation could be an acute response to exercise. Here we determined acute changes in foot clearances during stair walking in sedentary (n = 15) and physically active older adults (n = 15) after prolonged exercise.

Methods:

Kinematic data were acquired during negotiation with a 3-steps staircase while participants walked at preferred speed, before and after 30 min walking at preferred speed and using a treadmill. Foot clearances were compared before and after exercise and between the groups.

Results:

Sedentary older adults presented larger (0.5 cm for lead and 2 cm for trail leg) toe clearances in ascent, smaller (0.7 cm) heel clearance in the leading foot in descent, and larger (1 cm) heel clearance in the trailing foot in descent than physically active.

Conclusion:

Sedentary older adults negotiate stairs in a slightly different way than active older adults, and 30 min walking at preferred speed does not affect clearance in stair negotiation.

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Brian C. Focht, Deborah J. Knapp, Timothy P. Gavin, Thomas D. Raedeke and Robert C. Hickner

This study examined the psychological responses to an acute bout of aerobic exercise in sedentary older and younger adults. Eighteen young (mean age 24 years) and 15 older adults (mean age 64 years) completed a 20-min bout of stationary cycling at 65% of VO2peak. Affective responses were assessed before, during, and immediately after exercise. Participants’ exercise self-efficacy beliefs were assessed before and immediately after exercise. Both groups reported reduced pleasant feeling states and self-efficacy and increased physical exhaustion in response to acute exercise. Older adults also demonstrated a significant decrease in revitalization during and after cycling. Correlation analyses revealed that self-efficacy was related to feelings of fatigue during exercise and postexercise feelings of energy and fatigue. Both groups reported negative shifts in affect and self-efficacy during and 5 min after cycling. Acute affective and self-efficacy responses might influence one’s motivation to adopt and maintain regular physical activity. The relationship between these acute responses and physical activity behavior across the life span warrants future inquiry.

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Edmund O. Acevedo and Aaron L. Slusher

The relationship between stress and disease, in particular cardiovascular disease, has long been recognized, whereas the study of the physiological mechanisms that explain this link has only more recently received attention. The acute response to stress is generally thought to be a critically important adaptation designed to activate the system in preparation to cope with the stressor. However, prolonged stimulation of the system (acute and chronic) can lead to deleterious adaptations including the release of inflammatory cytokines (small proteins important in cell signaling) that play a critical role in the development of atherosclerosis. Scientists have therefore used a breadth of protocols and methods to identify the complexity of our fight-or-flight response and demonstrate the synergy between perception, the stress response, physical activity, and health. In addition, the critical assessment of cellular health, the gut microbiome, and genetic polymorphisms have further advanced our understanding of additional therapeutic targets against CVD.

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Bruno P. Melo, Débora A. Guariglia, Rafael E. Pedro, Dennis A. Bertolini, Solange de Paula Ramos, Sidney B. Peres and Solange M. Franzói de Moraes

, interleukin; nd, not detected; NS, nonsignificant; TNF, tumor necrosis factor. Discussion The aim of this study was to verify the acute responses to a combined training session on salivary cortisol, testosterone, IgA, and cytokines in ILWHA and to compare these responses with an HIV− group. The main outcomes

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Kieran J. Marston, Belinda M. Brown, Stephanie R. Rainey-Smith, Sabine Bird, Linda K. Wijaya, Shaun Y. M. Teo, Ralph N. Martins and Jeremiah J. Peiffer

–40 continuous min; Jakicic, Winters, Lang, & Wing, 1999 ). It is, therefore, important to explore the acute response in BDNF, IGF-1, and VEGF using a high-intensity, yet, ecologically valid, resistance exercise regimen in older adults. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the acute response in BDNF

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Mariana R. Silva, Cristine L. Alberton, Caroline O. Braga and Stephanie S. Pinto

intrasession exercise sequences have gained attention in recent studies, 18 , 19 , 21 as well as acute responses related to blood pressure pattern after different CT orders. 22 Nevertheless, for the best of the authors’ knowledge, there is still a gap in the literature regarding the acute EE responses

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Pablo A. Domene, Michelle Stanley and Glykeria Skamagki

. PubMed ID: 25058624 doi:10.1016/j.humov.2014.06.009 10.1016/j.humov.2014.06.009 25058624 8. Domene PA , Moir HJ , Pummell E , Easton C . Salsa dance and Zumba fitness: acute responses during community-based classes . J Sport Health Sci . 2016 ; 5 : 190 – 196 . doi:10.1016/j.jshs.2015

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Guy El Hajj Boutros, José A. Morais and Antony D. Karelis

-014-0158-x 10.1007/s40279-014-0158-x Perissiou , M. , Bailey , T.G. , Windsor , M. , Nam , M.C.Y. , Greaves , K. , Leicht , A.S. , … Askew , C.D. ( 2018 ). Effects of exercise intensity and cardiorespiratory fitness on the acute response of arterial stiffness to exercise in older adults