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Betteco J. de Boer, C. (Lieke) E. Peper, Arne Ridderikhoff and Peter J. Beek

In the current study, we examined whether coupling influences resulting from unintended afference-based phase entrainment are affected by movement amplitude as such or by the amplitude relation between the limbs. We assessed entrainment strength by studying how passive movements of the contralateral hand influenced unimanual coordination with a metronome. Results showed that amplitude as such did not affect entrainment strength, whereas the amplitude relation between the hands did. Larger amplitudes of the passive hand relative to the active hand resulted in stronger entrainment. This dependence on relative amplitude implies that entrainment strength is not only based on the intensity of afferent signals generated in the entraining limb but also on the susceptibility of the entrained limb to these signals.

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Elizabeth Coker and Terry Kaminski

Postural stability is maintained through the integration of visual, vestibular, and somatosensory afference to the postural control system, which is responsible for generating adaptive and corrective motor commands ( Singh, Taylor, Madigan, & Nussbaum, 2012 ). Removal of any of this afferent

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Alberto Pardo-Ibáñez, Jose L. Bermejo, Sergio Gandia, Julien Maitre, Israel Villarrasa-Sapiña, Isaac Estevan and Xavier Garcia-Masso

. Moreover, a maturation of visual afference in postural balance was confirmed around 15–16 years old. Acknowledgment Garcia-Masso gratefully acknowledges the support of the Generalitat Valenciana under project GV2015-047 . References Ajrezo , L. , Wiener-Vacher , S. , & Bucci , M.P. ( 2013