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Bouwien Smits-Engelsman, Wendy Aertssen and Emmanuel Bonney

optimal levels of agility as many of the tasks they perform involve speed, twists, and turns ( 23 ). This underscores the need for accurate assessment and training of agility performance in childhood. Agility has historically been defined as an individual’s ability to run and change direction quickly ( 15

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Garrett Bunyak

, birdwatching, rodeo, hunting, dogsled racing, angling, bullfighting and dog and cat agility. In both professional and amateur sport, spectators, athletes, and competitive eaters consume nonhuman animals as food and use equipment made from nonhuman animal bodies. The interlocking relationships animals share

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Fang-Yu Hsu, Kuei-Lan Tsai, Chia-Lun Lee, Wen-Dien Chang and Nai-Jen Chang

and badminton, table tennis players are reported to be more agile at side stepping. 3 In addition, table tennis stroke skills are also crucial, which can be quantified by ball speed. Therefore, power, agility, and ball speed play essential roles in a table tennis player’s ability to win competitions

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Daniel J. Brinkmann, Harald Koerger, Albert Gollhofer and Dominic Gehring

Agility running is a key component of soccer performance and includes accelerations, decelerations, changes of direction, and initiations of whole-body movements. 1 The frequency of such soccer-specific movements (>700 cuts and turns within a match by a player in the English football association

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Maria C. Madueno, Vincent J. Dalbo, Joshua H. Guy, Kate E. Giamarelos, Tania Spiteri and Aaron T. Scanlan

Pre-exercise Screening System (Exercise and Sports Science Australia). Players also gave verbal and written informed consent and were familiarized with study procedures, including completion of the Agility 5-0-5 Test. Each player then completed three 20-m linear sprints with 2 minutes of passive

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Jon L. Oliver and Robert W. Meyers

Purpose:

The purpose of the current study was to assess the reliability of a new protocol that examines different components of agility using commercially available timing gates.

Methods:

Seventeen physically active males completed four trials of a new protocol, which consisted of a number of 10-m sprints. Sprints were completed in a straight line or with a change of direction after 5 m. The change of direction was either planned or reactive, with participants reacting to a visual light stimulus.

Results:

There was no systematic bias in any of the measures, although random variation was reduced in the straight acceleration and planned agility when considering only the fnal pair of trials, with mean coefficients of variation (CV) of 1.6% (95%CI, 1.2% to 2.4%) and 1.1% (0.8% to 1.7%), respectively. Reliability of reactive agility remained consistent throughout with mean CVs of approximately 3%. Analyses revealed a high degree of common variance between acceleration times and both planned (r 2 = .93) and reactive (r 2 = .83) agility, as well as between the two agility protocols (r 2 = .87).

Conclusion:

Both planned and reactive agility could be measured reliably. Protocol design and use of a light stimulus in the reactive test emphasize physical abilities comparable with other test measures. Therefore, inclusion of a reactive light stimulus does not appear to require any additional perceptual qualities.

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Javad Sarvestan and Zdeněk Svoboda

, tennis, and volleyball, also require cutting and turning in both the lateral and frontal planes. 15 For optimal performance, athletes in all of these sports require increased ankle stability. Agility tests demand quick deceleration, direction change, and reacceleration during the movements. 16 These 3

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Matthew Ellis, Mark Noon, Tony Myers and Neil Clarke

accelerations) or fatigue resistance during a soccer simulation match with young soccer players (18 [1] y) 9 despite improving reactive agility in elite youth soccer players (14 [1] y). 10 High doses of caffeine have also been reported to increase the susceptibility to negative side effects (increased heart

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Greg Henry, Brian Dawson, Brendan Lay and Warren Young

Purpose:

To study the validity of a video-based reactive agility test in Australian footballers.

Methods:

15 higher performance, 15 lower performance, and 12 nonfootballers completed a light-based reactive agility test (LRAT), a video-based reactive agility test (VRAT), and a planned test (PLAN).

Results:

With skill groups pooled, agility time in PLAN (1346 ± 66 ms) was significantly faster (P = .001) than both reactive tests (VRAT = 1550 ± 102 ms; LRAT = 1572 ± 97 ms). In addition, decision time was significantly faster (P = .001; d = 0.8) in LRAT (278 ± 36 ms) than VRAT (311 ± 47 ms). The correlation in agility time between the two reactive tests (r = .75) was higher than between the planned and reactive tests (r = .41–.68). Higher performance players had faster agility and movement times on VRAT (agility, 130 ± 24 ms, d = 1.27, P = .004; movement, 69 ± 73 ms, d = 0.88, P = .1) and LRAT (agility, 95 ± 86 ms, d = 0.99, P = .08; movement, 79 ± 74 ms; d = 0.9; P = .08) than the nonfootballers. In addition, higher (55 ± 39 ms, d = 0.87, P = .05) and lower (40 ± 57 ms, d = 0.74, P = .18) performance groups exhibited somewhat faster agility time than nonfootballers on PLAN. Furthermore, higher performance players were somewhat faster than lower performance for agility time on the VRAT (63 ± 85 ms, d = 0.82, P = .16) and decision time on the LRAT (20 ± 39 ms, d = 0.66, P = .21), but there was little difference in PLAN agility time between these groups (15 ± 150 ms, d = 0.24, P = .8).

Conclusions:

Differences in decision-making speed indicate that the sport-specific nature of the VRAT is not duplicated by a light-based stimulus. In addition, the VRAT is somewhat better able to discriminate different groups of Australian footballers than the LRAT. Collectively, this indicates that a video-based test is a more valid assessment tool for examining agility in Australian footballers.

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Ryan Holding, Rudi Meir and Shi Zhou

The purpose of this study was to examine whether a video-based warm-up could provide an acute performance benefit to response time for athletes in a sport-specific agility task. In addition, 2 learning strategies, explicit and implicit, were compared for their effectiveness in facilitating an improvement in sport-specific agility. Thirty representative male junior rugby union players (age 14–16 y, mean age 14.6 ± 1.09 y) were placed in 3 experimental groups (explicit, implicit, and control) and completed 2 intervention sessions. Testing sessions included preintervention testing, completion of the video-based warm-up intervention, and postintervention testing. A 3D motion-analysis system was used to assess response time in the testing battery. The athletes’ response times on the pre- to postintervention tests were compared to determine the effectiveness of the video-based warm-up. A 2-way general linear model with repeated-measures analysis indicated that both the explicit (P = .030, d = 0.28) and implicit (P = .049, d = 0.33) groups significantly improved their response time by the intervention compared with the control group (P = .367, d = 0.08). The mean postintervention response time for the explicit group improved by 19.1% (from 0.246 s pre to 0.199 s post), and the implicit group improved by 15.7% (from 0.268 s to 0.226 s). Findings suggest that a video-based warm-up may provide an acute benefit to sport-specific agility performance for junior athletes.