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Jessyca N. Arthur-Cameselle and Molly Curcio

is only effective for roughly 50 to 70% of individuals with EDs (e.g.,  Keel & Brown, 2010 ). For those with Anorexia Nervosa (AN), there may even be strong reluctance to recover ( Nordbø et al., 2012 ), yet it is clear that motivation and readiness for change predicts success in ED treatment

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Paula Charest-Lilly, Claudine Sherrill and Joel Rosentswieg

The purpose of this study was to examine the estimated body composition values of women hospitalized for treatment of anorexia nervosa in relation to values reported in the literature for women without known dietary problems. Sixteen volunteers between the ages of 16 and 37 years from hospitals in California and Texas participated in the study. Data collected included height, weight, and selected skinfold and circumference measures. Statistical analyses included independent and paired t tests. Significant differences were found between the percent body fat of anorexic subjects (M = 15.54%) and that of normative women in the Jackson, Pollock, and Ward (1980) study (M = 24.09%). When the actual weight of the anorexic subjects (M = 99.3 lb) was compared with their theoretical minimal weight calculated by the Behnke (1969) formula (M = 106.5 lb), no significant difference was obtained. A comparison of somatogram data for the anorexic women and the reference woman found significant differences at 5 of the 11 sites measured.

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Tanja Hechler, Elizabeth Rieger, Stephen Touyz, Pierre Beumont, Guy Plasqui and Klaas Westerterp

The study aimed to compare differences in physical activity, the relationship between physical activity and body composition, and seasonal variation in physical activity in outpatients with anorexia nervosa (AN) and healthy controls. Physical activity (CM-AMT) and time spent in different intensities of 10 female individuals with AN and 15 female controls was assessed across three seasons along with the percentage body fat. The two groups did not differ in their physical activity and both demonstrated seasonal variation. The percentage body fat of individuals with AN, but not that of the controls, was negatively related to CM-AMT and time spent in low-moderate intesnity acitivy (LMI). Seasonal variation in physical activity emerged with increases in engagement in LMI during the summer period for both groups. Possible interpretations of the finding that decreased physical activity was related to a normalization of percentage body fat in the individuals with AN are discussed and implications for treatment are highlighted.

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Laura K. Fewell, Riley Nickols, Amanda Schlitzer Tierney and Cheri A. Levinson

effectiveness of integrating exercise in treatment. Exercise has been shown to reinforce weight gain and increase body mass index (BMI) in inpatients with anorexia nervosa (AN) and supervised aerobic and strength training exercises have been shown to effectively reduce eating disorder symptoms ( Calogero

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Zella E. Moore, Raquel Ciampa, Jaime Wilsnack and Elizabeth Wright

Eating disorders are serious clinical issues that can have severe physical and psychological ramifications. Although prevalence rates of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are low in the general population, it has been reported that prevalence rates are higher among individuals involved in the athletic milieu. Unfortunately, based on the demands of the sport environment, these individuals may be significantly less likely to seek treatment for these disorders, thus may experience dangerous short- and long-term consequences. Yet, even when such athletes do seek help, they often receive psychological treatments that have not been demonstrated to be efficacious among methodologically sound research studies. This article clarifies the current state of eating disorder treatment efficacy so that practitioners working with eating disordered athletic clientele can adopt more ethical and effective treatment practices.

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Laura K. Fewell, Riley Nickols, Amanda Schlitzer Tierney and Cheri A. Levinson

were 91 male and female athlete patients and 76 male and female non-athlete patients entering either a residential or partial hospitalization (PHP) treatment program for EDs between December 2012 and June 2017. Participants were diagnosed with anorexia nervosa (AN; restricting or binge/purge subtype

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Rachael E. Flatt and Craig Barr Taylor

-clinical ED or clinical ED, with the exception of Anorexia Nervosa (AN), are paired with a guided self-help intervention program, meaning a mental health care provider or “coach” works in tandem with the self-help content whether it is electronically through the program (e.g., through a messaging system) or

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Jenny H. Conviser, Amanda Schlitzer Tierney and Riley Nickols

It is estimated that 10 million women in the United States and 1 million men, of diverse gender, ethnicity, socio-cultural origin, socioeconomic status and age will meet diagnostic criteria for ED during their lifetime, including anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), binge eating disorder

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Jenny H. Conviser, Amanda Schlitzer Tierney and Riley Nickols

://www.apa.org/ethics/code/index.aspx Arcelus , J. , Mitchell , A.J. , Wales , J. , & Nielsen , S. ( 2011 ). Mortality rates in patients with anorexia nervosa and other eating disorders . Archives of General Psychiatry, 68 , 724 – 731 . 21727255 doi:10.1001/archgenpsychiatry.2011.74 10.1001/archgenpsychiatry.2011.74 Chatterton

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Pooja Somasundaram and Alexandra M. Burgess

anorexia and bulimia nervosa, and has been utilized across a variety of previous studies among similar samples ( DiBartolo & Shaffer, 2002 ; Reinking & Alexander, 2005 ). The measure is rated on a 6-point Likert scale. The test-retest reliability for the Body Dissatisfaction subscale was found to be above