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Chad Seifried, Brian Soebbing and Kwame J.A. Agyemang

contributions. First, we suggest strategic IR are capable of producing new products when certain conditions are met regarding asymmetry, reciprocity, and efficiency. Second, the present findings indicate sport organizations rich in resources may be slower to establish additional IR because of resource buffers

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Mark Norman, Katelyn Esmonde and Courtney Szto

or knowledge to write authoritatively about the sport. It is problematic that, through my self-presentation of my privilege, I could both claim legitimacy as a hockey blogger and create a buffer against the cruel, dismissive, and hateful comments that regularly silence or diminish the voices less

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Matea Wasend and Nicole M. LaVoi

the female athletes in this sample, their female collegiate coaches acted as retroactive buffers against perceived barriers to success in coaching. Research by Dixon and Bruening ( 2007 ) also suggests that women coaches may model effective ways to balance professional life with family obligations

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Udi Carmi and Orr Levental

were evacuated from British bases along the Suez Canal. This signaled a fundamental change in the geo-strategic character of the Middle East, for it ended the standstill along a border that had been quiet since 1949 thanks to the British buffer zone. Egypt then blocked the Straits of Tiran to Israeli

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Chad Seifried, Brian Soebbing and Kwame J.A. Agyemang

), substantial payouts, and playing dates on New Year’s Day or after New Year’s. 7 Knoben, “Localized Inter-organizational Linkages,” 761. 8 Anne S. Miner, Terry L. Amburgey, and Timothy M. Stearns, “Interorganizational Linkages and Population Dynamics: Buffering and Transformational Shields,” Administrative

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Hal A. Lawson and R. Scott Kretchmar

Debates-as-battles have characterized the histories of physical education and kinesiology. This colorful part of the field’s history was characterized by leaders’ narrow, rigid views, and it paved the way for divisiveness, excessive specialization, and fragmentation. Today’s challenge is to seek common purpose via stewardship-oriented dialogue, and it requires a return to first order questions regarding purposes, ethics, values, moral imperatives, and social responsibilities. These questions are especially timely insofar as kinesiology risks running on a kind of automatic pilot, seemingly driven by faculty self-interests and buffered from consequential changes in university environments and societal contexts. A revisionist history of kinesiology’s origins and development suggests that it can be refashioned as a helping discipline, one that combines rigor, relevance, and altruism. It gives rise to generative questions regarding what a 21st century discipline prioritizes and does, and it opens opportunity pathways for crossing boundaries and bridging divides. Three sets of conclusions illuminate unrealized possibilities for a vibrant, holistic kinesiology—a renewed discipline that is fit for purpose in 21st century contexts.

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Jeffrey A. Graham and Marlene A. Dixon

, multiple roles provide a buffer against failure in any single role (i.e., status security). Third, role accumulation leads to a build-up of tangible and social resources, which are transferrable and thus increase one’s ability to meet the obligations of other roles in the role system (i.e., status

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Joseph H. Moore

researchers have considered how to use the tool most effectively ( Cooper, 2013 ; DeMers, 2015 ; Hall, 2015 ). They found that one way of increasing engagement is to use visuals. Hall ( 2015 ) reported that 63% of all social media is images, and tweets with images on Buffer receive 150% more retweets than

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Gregory A. Cranmer and Sara LaBelle

process—an underexplored component underlying athletes’ reporting behaviors ( Baugh et al., 2014 ). These relational elements significantly predicted athletes’ intentions to disclose symptomology to coaches in the current study. Likewise, athlete–coach relational quality buffered some of the effects of

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Jessica L. David, Matthew D. Powless, Jacqueline E. Hyman, DeJon M. Purnell, Jesse A. Steinfeldt and Shelbi Fisher

buffer the potential negative psychological impact that public criticism has on student athletes. Domain 5, #SportPerformanceImplications, also aligns with the dimension of self-acceptance due to reported internalization and lasting effects of Twitter interactions on the participants ( Ryff & Keyes, 1995