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Cynthia A. Gillette, Richard C. Bullough and Christopher L. Melby

Postexercise energy metabolism was examined in male subjects age 22-35 years in response to three different treatments: a strenuous bout of resistive exercise (REx), a bout of stationary cycling (AEx) at 50% peak VO2, and a control condition (C) of quiet sitting. Resting metabolic rate (RMR) was measured the morning of and the morning following each condition. Recovery oxygen consumption (RcO2) was measured for 5 hr following each treatment. Total 5-hr RcO2 was higher for the REx treatment relative to both AEx and C, with the largest treatment differences occurring early during recovery. There were no large treatment differences in postexercise respiratory exchange ratio values, except for the first hour of recovery following REx. RMR measured 14.5 hr postexercise for the REx condition was significantly elevated compared to C. These results suggest that strenuous resistive exercise results in a greater excess postexercise oxygen consumption compared to steady-state endurance exercise of similar estimated energy cost.

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Gary J. Farkas, Marika A. Pitot and David R. Gater Jr.

variance ( Farkas & Gater, 2017 ). Therefore, increases or decreases in FFM can substantially affect TDEE, and following an SCI, RMR is considerably influenced ( Buchholz et al., 2003a ; Monroe et al., 1998 ). Direct, or whole body, calorimetry measures the amount of heat produced by a study participant

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Julia L. Bone and Louise M. Burke

™ activity monitors (Mini-MF; BodyMedia, Pittsburgh, PA) were worn to monitor compliance to training and to estimate total energy expenditure (SenseWear version 8; BodyMedia, Pittsburgh, PA). REE Collection Resting energy expenditure was measured using indirect calorimetry. Measurements were collected at the

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Nicole C.A. Strock, Kristen J. Koltun, Emily A. Southmayd, Nancy I. Williams and Mary Jane De Souza

Harris–Benedict, Cunningham (1980 and 1991), and DXA prediction methods against indirect calorimetry-measured RMR; (b) determine how each ratio relates to known physiological consequences of energy deficiency; and (c) confirm the use of a 0.90 ratio or propose alternative threshold cutoff values for use

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Jorge Cañete García-Prieto, Vicente Martinez-Vizcaino, Antonio García-Hermoso, Mairena Sánchez-López, Natalia Arias-Palencia, Juan Fernando Ortega Fonseca and Ricardo Mora-Rodriguez

The aim of this study was to examine the energy expenditure (EE) measured using indirect calorimetry (IC) during playground games and to assess the validity of heart rate (HR) and accelerometry counts as indirect indicators of EE in children´s physical activity games. 32 primary school children (9.9 ± 0.6 years old, 19.8 ± 4.9 kg · m-2 BMI and 37.6 ± 7.2 ml · kg-1 · min-1 VO2max). Indirect calorimetry (IC), accelerometry and HR data were simultaneously collected for each child during a 90 min session of 30 playground games. Thirty-eight sessions were recorded in 32 different children. Each game was recorded at least in three occasions in other three children. The intersubject coefficient of variation within a game was 27% for IC, 37% for accelerometry and 13% for HR. The overall mean EE in the games was 4.2 ± 1.4 kcals · min-1 per game, totaling to 375 ± 122 kcals/per 90 min/session. The correlation coefficient between indirect calorimetry and accelerometer counts was 0.48 (p = .026) for endurance games and 0.21 (p = .574) for strength games. The correlation coefficient between indirect calorimetry and HR was 0.71 (p = .032) for endurance games and 0.48 (p = .026) for strength games. Our data indicate that both accelerometer and HR monitors are useful devices for estimating EE during endurance games, but only HR monitors estimates are accurate for endurance games.

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Michael C. Riddell, Oded Bar-Or, Beatriz V. Ayub, Randolph E. Calvert and George J.F. Heigenhauser

There are currently no guidelines regarding the carbohydrate (CHO) dosage required to prevent exercise-induced hypoglycemia in children with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). To prevent hypoglycemia by matching glucose ingestion with total-CHO utilization, 20 adolescents with IDDM attended 2 trials: control (CT; drinking water) and glucose (GT; drinking 6-8% glucose). Participants performed 60 min of moderate-intensity cycling 100 min after insulin injection and breakfast. CT's total-CHO utilization during exercise was determined using indirect calorimetry. In GT, participants ingested glucose in the amount equal to total CHO utilization in the CT. A total of 9 participants had BG <4.0 mmol/L in CT compared to 3 in GT (p < .05). In conclusion, glucose ingestion equal to total-CHO utilization attenuates the drop in blood glucose and reduces the likelihood of hypoglycemia during exercise in adolescents with IDDM.

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Jennifer Gornall and Rudolph G. Villani

The primary aim was to investigate whether the reduction in resting metabolic rate (RMR) and fat free mass (FFM) associated with a short-term very low kilojoule diet (VLKD) is altered by concurrent resistance exercise. Twenty overweight, premenopausal women were pair matched on body surface area and randomly assigned to either diet only (3,400 kJ/day) or diet combined with resistance training. Before and after 4 weeks of treatment, RMR was assessed by indirect calorimetry; total body mass (TBM), FFM, and fat mass (FM) by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry; total body water (TBW) by bioelectrical impedance; and strength by a weight-lifting test. Both groups had significantly lower TBM, FFM, FM, TBW, absolute RMR, and RMR, with FFM as the covariate, in the posttests than the pretests with no significant differences between groups. It was concluded that 4 weeks of resistance training did not prevent or reduce the decline in FFM and RMR observed with a VLKD.

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Lesley J. White, Rudolph H. Dressendorfer, Eric Holland, Sean C. McCoy and Michael A. Ferguson

We examined the acute effect of cold-water temperature on post-exercise energy intake (EI) for 1 h. In a randomized, crossover design, 11 men (25.6 ± 5 y) exercised for 45 min on a submersed cycle ergometer at 60 ± 2% VO2max in 33°C (neutral) and 20° (cold) water temperatures, and also rested for 45 min (control). Energy expenditure (EE) was determined using indirect calorimetry before, during, and after each condition. Following exercise or rest, subjects had free access to a standard assortment of food items of known caloric value. EE was similar for the cold and neutral water conditions, averaging 505 ± 22 (± standard deviation) and 517 ± 42 kcal, respectively (P = NS). EI after the cold condition averaged 877 ± 457 kcal, 44% and 41% higher (P < 0.05) than for the neutral and resting conditions, respectively. Cold-water temperature thus stimulated post-exercise EI. Water temperature warrants consideration in aquatic programs designed for weight loss.

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Gianluca Vernillo, Aldo Savoldelli, Barbara Pellegrini and Federico Schena

The current study aimed to show the validity of a portable motion sensor, the SenseWear Armband (SWA), for the estimation of energy expenditure during pole walking. Twenty healthy adults (mean ± SD: age 30.1 ± 7.2 year, body mass 66.1 ± 10.6 kg, height 172.4 ± 8.0 cm, BMI 22.1 ± 2.4 kg·m−2) wore the armband during randomized pole walking activities at a constant speed (1.25 m·s−1) and at seven grades (0%, ±5%, ±15% and ±25%). Estimates of total energy expenditure from the armband were compared with values derived from indirect calorimetry methodology (IC) using a 2–way mixed model ANOVA (Device × Slope), correlation analyses and Bland-Altman plots. Results revealed significant main effects for device, and slope (p < .025) as well as a significant interaction (p < .001). Significant differences between IC and SWA were observed for all conditions (p < .05). SWA generally underestimate the EE values during uphill PW by 0.04 kcal·kg−1·min−1 (p < .05). Whereas, a significant overestimation has been detected during flat and downhill PW by 0.01 and 0.03 kcal·kg−1·min−1 (p < .05), respectively. The Bland-Altman plots revealed bias of the armband compared with the indirect calorimetry at any condition examined. The present data suggest that the armband is not accurate to correctly detect and estimate the energy expenditure during pole walking activities. Therefore, the observed over- and under-estimations warrants more work to improve the ability of SWA to accurately measure EE for these activities.

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Jennie A. Gilbert and James E. Misner

This study examined the metabolic response to a 763-kcal mixed meal at rest and during 30 min of exercise at 50% maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) in 8 aerobically trained (AT), 8 resistance trained (RT), and 8 untrained (UT) subjects. Oxygen consumption (VO,) was measured minute by minute during 30 min of exercise by indirect calorimetry on 2 nonconsecutive days (postabsorptive exercise, PA; and postprandial exercise, PP). Total VO, consumed and total caloric expenditure during the PA and PP conditions were similar for the three groups, indicating that prior food intake did not affect energy expenditure during exercise. Consequently, TEM during exercise did not differ significantly among the groups. Respiratory exchange ratio (R) differed significantly only during the PA condition, with the AT group exhibiting significantly lower R values compared to the RT group, and significantly lower R values compared to the UT group. These data suggest that the consumption of a meal 30 min prior to exercise does not increase TEM during exercise in AT, RT, and UT subjects.