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Leilani Madrigal and Diane L. Gill

Using the Integrated Model of Response to Sport Injury as a theoretical framework, athletes’ psychological strengths and emotional responses were explored throughout the injury process using a case study approach. Four Division I athletes completed measures of mental toughness, hardiness, and optimism before their season (time 1), once they became injured (time 2), midway through rehabilitation (time 3), and when they were cleared to participate (time 4). Coping behavior, psychological response, and rehabilitation adherence were recorded at time 2–time 4, while recovering. In addition, interviews were conducted after time 4. Mental toughness, hardiness, and optimism varied over time and across cases, with broad individual differences in response to injury. Athletes experienced a loss of athletic identity combined with feelings of guilt and helplessness over the initial stages of injury, but positive experiences were also found. All cases also reported playing through injury. Understanding the psychological strengths and responses of athletes can help professionals work with injured athletes.

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David A. Shearer, Stephen D. Mellalieu and Catherine R. Shearer

While posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is most commonly associated with survivors of traumatic events (e.g., combat), PTSD can occur after any situation in which victims perceive that their life or safety is threatened. In sport, athletes often place themselves in dangerous situations and are also exposed to the same lifestyle dangers as the general population. The literature on PTSD among athletes is sparse, and consequently, it is possible that many (non-clinical) sport psychologists would fail to recognize the symptoms and may subsequently fail to refer the athlete to the appropriate professional for clinical assistance. In the following case study, we present an example of an athlete suffering from PTSD following a serious bicycle accident in which she sustained head and facial injuries. We briefly detail the nature of PTSD and discuss how sport psychology services can be implemented alongside a parallel clinical intervention program. Finally, we offer recommendations for practice when working with athletes with PTSD.

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Kathryn L. Heinze, Sara Soderstrom and Jennifer Zdroik

The rise and institutionalization of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in sport is captured in a growing body of work in sport management. This literature suggests professional teams should be strategic in their approaches—matching internal resources with external needs—but we lack an understanding of the processes and mechanisms in the evolution to more strategic CSR, as well as specific practices that characterize these approaches. Further, by focusing on broad trends in how and why teams are adopting CSR, we miss the opportunity to learn from teams with innovative and authentic CSR approaches. To address these gaps, this article uses a qualitative case-study approach to examine how one professional team in the U.S.—the Detroit Lions—evolved their CSR to a more strategic and authentic partnership-focused model. Our findings point to key process steps and mechanisms in the decision making around, and implementation of, this approach, including the role of organizational structure, leadership, and community partnerships. We draw out themes around these central partnerships and highlight best practices. In offering a more nuanced understanding of professional sport CSR process and practice, we contribute to the literature on CSR in sport, sport-community partnerships, and sport and city revitalization.

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Mathew Dowling and Marvin Washington

This investigation examined how a network of knowledge-based professionals—the Canadian Sport for Life Leadership Team (CS4LLT)—as a newly emerging organizational form was able to influence the Canadian sport policy and governance process in an attempt to reshape Canadian sport. The analysis draws upon the epistemic community approach (Haas, 1992; Haas & Adler, 1992) and empirical data collected as part of an in-depth case study examination into the leadership team and senior Sport Canada officials. The findings support the notion that the CS4LLT, as a network of knowledge-based professionals with legitimated and authoritative and policy-relevant expertise (epistemic community), was able to influence the Canadian sport policy process through (i) influencing key governmental actors by (re)framing policy-relevant issues and (ii) establishing knowledge/truth claims surrounding athlete development, which, in turn, enabled direct and indirect involvement in and influence over the sport policy renewal process. More broadly, the study draws attention to the potential role and importance of knowledge-based professional networks as a fluid, dynamic, and responsive approach to organizing and managing sport that can reframe policy debates, insert ideas, and enable policy learning.

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Roy David Samuel

obligatory), and is paid for by the organization. However, occasional consultation is also conducted with lower league’s referees, young prospect referees (see Samuel, 2017 ) and second-division referees who indicate a potential for promotion to the Premier League. The present case study describes the

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Rory J. Mack, Jeff D. Breckon, Paul D. O’Halloran and Joanne Butt

psychology as a blended framework on which CB and other interventions might be delivered and their effectiveness enhanced. A case-study approach is employed to provide a context and examples of the processes and technical and relational components of MI, to underpin both the therapeutic alliance and PST

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Steve M. Smith, Stewart T. Cotterill and Hazel Brown

evaluation. Method The Case-Study Approach and Context Case-study approaches facilitate the empirical inquiry of contemporary phenomena in real-world contexts where the experiences of individuals can provide measures for assessment ( Yin, 2014 ). These approaches are especially useful when one is trying to

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Evan Frederick and Ann Pegoraro

-media platforms such as Facebook can be used by athletes and organizations to control their image repair, introduce competing narratives, and redirect audiences. With that in mind, the purpose of this case study was to determine what image-repair strategies the University of Louisville employed immediately after

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Matt Hoffmann, Todd Loughead and Jeffrey Caron

athlete mentor. Using a case-study design, we focused on the stories this individual constructed about his experiences as a peer mentor to athletes, with the goal of identifying practical implications based on the knowledge gained through these stories. The main research questions guiding this study were

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Sada Reed and Guy Harrison

journalists determine who becomes a news source and, as a result, determine whose agenda shapes content creation ( Brooks, Kennedy, Moen, & Ranly, 2002 ; Reich, 2010 ). The current case study is appropriate because journalism scholarship historically pins anonymous or unnamed sourcing as being less credible