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Kathleen M. Armour

This paper considers long-standing concerns about research/theory practice gaps in kinesiology, and proposes one potential solution. An analysis of the problem is followed by an overview and illustration of a new translational research mechanism: pedagogical cases (Armour, 2014). This mechanism has been designed to support the training and career-long development of practitioners in the broad field of physical activity education (PAE). It is argued that PAE practice is always interdisciplinary, therefore researchers in the kinesiology sub/disciplines have a responsibility to collaborate across disciplinary boundaries to develop new, interdisciplinary knowledge that meets the needs of practitioners. It is also argued that researchers and practitioners have a responsibility to work together to do the difficult synthesis work required to improve both research and practice.

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Wojtek Chodzko-Zajko, Erica M. Taylor and T. Gilmour Reeve

physical activity requires different curriculum models to accommodate the numerous career opportunities associated with our discipline. Using the Core Content to Implement a Bachelor’s Degree in Kinesiology: A Case Study From Delaware State University This case study outlines how the Department of Public

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Michael A. Hemphill and Tom Martinek

Many kinesiology departments engage in partnerships that aim to promote positive youth development through physical activity. These partnerships are often enhanced by mutually beneficial goals and shared decision making between university and community partners. This paper describes how sport has been at the center of two university-community partnerships that have helped to teach life skills to youth. We draw upon our experience working with community partners to illuminate challenges and opportunities for youth-focused partnerships. The programs include an emphasis on sustainability. As kinesiology programs continue to enhance their efforts to partner and support youth development, case studies such as this may help inform our efforts.

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Maureen M. Smith

As women age, society assigns stereotypes that suggest that older women are no longer capable of being competent athletes. In considering the experiences of older women in sport from a sociological perspective, this article provides a short summary of works examining older women in masters sport settings, as well as three brief case studies of older women engaged in sport and movement. As American women age, more of them will have experienced organized high school sport (after the passage of Title IX), suggesting that the experiences of older women in sport will take on new dimensions and meanings worthy of exploration.

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Mary E. Rudisill

Over the past 35 years, institutions of higher education have been involved in strategic planning in an attempt to promote their priorities and remain competitive in challenging economic times. Efforts have been made to improve the process and effectiveness of strategic planning over those years. Although strategic planning can be effective, the plan must be created properly and also implemented in an effective manner. Since online learning has become an increasingly important revenue source for many institutions of higher education, as well as an alternative way to provide instruction to students, it is typically included within institutional strategic plans and prioritized for growth. Ensuring that faculty “buy-in” to this goal and strategic priorities requires significant faculty engagement. In this paper, options for implementation and ways to promote engagement are discussed within a case study of how Auburn University kinesiology faculty took part in educational transformation and innovation by connecting to the campus mission.

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Paul Keiper and Richard B. Kreider

Online education has become an increasingly popular means of delivering educational programs in health and kinesiology. It has helped departments meet increasing enrollment demands and provided additional resources that support students and faculty. A number of challenges, however, are associated with developing these types of programs. The purpose of this paper is to discuss some of the issues that Texas A&M University has experienced in developing extensive online courses and distance education programs. The paper discusses methods and models employed to develop online and distance programs in health and kinesiology and provides a case study of some of the opportunities and challenges that the Sport Management Division experienced in developing an online master's program. Issues related to efficacy, management, funding, and student success are discussed. Health and kinesiology administrators should consider these issues as they look to develop or grow online course offerings in the discipline.

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Gretchen Kerr, Anthony Battaglia and Ashley Stirling

The recent, highly publicized cases of maltreatment of athletes have garnered critical attention by the public at large and stakeholders in sport, alike. For many, these cases threaten popular views that sport contributes in important ways to positive youth development. The growing evidence showing that maltreatment occurs to youth sport participants highlights the need for safe, harm-free sport environments as a fundamental prerequisite for positive developments to be reaped. By unpacking the case study of USA Gymnastics and Dr. Larry Nassar’s abuses in this paper, the authors show that for athlete maltreatment to occur and be sustained across so many victims and so many years, more than a perpetrator is needed. The nature of the environment, from the interpersonal level to organizational policies and societal influences, contributes to the occurrence and perpetuation of athlete maltreatment. Using Bronfenbrenner’s ecological-systems model, the authors argue for a systemic approach to preventing and addressing athlete maltreatment. Recommendations are posed for safeguarding youth athletes and fostering the sporting conditions in which positive youth development can occur.

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Thomas J. Templin, Jason R. Carter and Kim C. Graber

student learning outcomes of the core content and examples of how universities of different sizes and missions have attempted to incorporate the AKA Core into their respective curricula. The keynote by was complemented by a case study presented by Erica Taylor from Delaware State University in which

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Peter F. Bodary and M. Melissa Gross

as analyzing the anatomical fidelity of objects in the university art museum; comparing skeletal anatomy found in the university natural history museum with humans; case studies, in which students presented a personal injury or condition and identified anatomical structures on an image of the injury

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K. Andrew R. Richards, Colin G. Pennington and Oleg A. Sinelnikov

 Narrative 3 (3.45%) 0 3 0 0  Symbolic interactionalist 1 (1.15%) 0 0 0 1  Ethnography 20 (22.99%) 1 9 7 3  Interview 21 (24.13%) 3 6 6 6  Focus group 3 (3.45%) 0 1 0 2  Phenomenological 29 (33.33%) 1 9 14 5  Case study 10 (11.49%) 0 3 2 5 Type of Quantitative Research  Descriptive 11 (29.73%) 1 3 2 5