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Sarah Burkart, Jasmin Roberts, Matthew C. Davidson and Sofiya Alhassan

. Methods Participants Data collection for this study occurred as part of a larger PA intervention study called Project PLAY (Preschoolers skilL-based ActivitY study). 17 Project PLAY was a group-randomized controlled 6-month pilot study designed to examine the effect of a classroom teacher

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Sofiya Alhassan, Christine W. St. Laurent, Sarah Burkart, Cory J. Greever and Matthew N. Ahmadi

. Research to date suggests that a preschool center’s ORHB environment plays a role in children’s ORHBs. 9 – 11 A review by Ward et al 4 reported that for a health behavior intervention to be sustainable, it must be delivered by the center staff (eg, classroom teachers). However, teachers are generally

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Rosemarie Martin and Elaine Murtagh

Background:

A cluster randomized controlled trial was conducted to assess the effectiveness of the Active Classrooms intervention, which integrates movement into academic lessons, on the moderate-to-vigorous physical activity levels (MVPA) of primary school children during class-time and throughout the school day.

Methods:

Ten classroom teachers and their students aged 8 to 12 years were recruited and randomized into the Active Classrooms intervention group (n = 131students, n = 5teachers) or a delayed-treatment controlled group (n = 117students, n = 5teachers). The intervention group participated in active academic lessons taught by the classroom teacher over an 8 week period. Accelerometers were used to gather physical activity data at baseline, postintervention and at 4 months follow-up. Teachers completed a questionnaire to evaluate the program.

Results:

A significant difference for change in daily class time MVPA levels was identified between the treatment (n = 95) and control (n = 91) groups from pre- to postintervention (P < .001) and this difference was maintained at follow-up (P < .001). No significant difference emerged between the treatment and control groups for change in school day MVPA levels from pre- to postintervention (P = .52) or follow-up (P = .09). Teachers reported that they were highly satisfied with the program.

Conclusions:

Movement integration has the potential to improve physical activity levels of primary school children in the classroom.

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Erin Holt, Todd Bartee and Kate Heelan

Background:

Implementing physical activity (PA) within academic curricula increases energy expenditure and enhances academic achievement in elementary students. The purposes of the study were to determine the extent teachers met the 20-minute PA policy, identify how teachers met the policy, and measure the level of intensity of PA provided.

Methods:

Four elementary schools (grades K−5; 68 classroom teachers) implemented a district-mandated 20-minute PA policy. Teachers recorded PA for 1 week in September 2010 and February 2011. A sample of 142 students (grades K−5) wore accelerometers to measure school day PA.

Results:

While 40% and 4% of teachers in September and February respectively met the policy all 5 days, 72.5% and 45.7% of teachers in September and February respectively implemented PA at least 3 days/week. Accelerometry results indicated curriculum-based lessons (CBL; 59.92 ± 20.38 min) or walk/run periods (51.56 ± 18.67 min) significantly increased school day MVPA (P < .05) above no additional activity (30.96 ± 22.57 min).

Conclusions:

Although the teachers did not meet the 20-minute policy every day, the increased amount of PA achieved each week through the teachers’ efforts is a significant contributor to total daily PA levels of children.

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Karen Martin, Alexandra Bremner, Jo Salmon, Michael Rosenberg and Billie Giles-Corti

Background:

The objective of this study was to develop a multidomain model to identify key characteristics of the primary school environment associated with children’s physical activity (PA) during class-time.

Methods:

Accelerometers were used to calculate time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity during class-time (CMVPA) of 408 sixth-grade children (mean ± SD age 11.1 ± 0.43 years) attending 27 metropolitan primary schools in Perth Western Australia. Child and staff self-report instruments and a school physical environment scan administered by the research team were used to collect data about children and the class and school environments. Hierarchical modeling identified key variables associated with CMVPA.

Results:

The final multilevel model explained 49% of CMVPA. A physically active physical education (PE) coordinator, fitness sessions incorporated into PE sessions and either a trained PE specialist, classroom teacher or nobody coordinating PE in the school, rather than the deputy principal, were associated with higher CMVPA. The amount of grassed area per student and sporting apparatus on grass were also associated with higher CMVPA.

Conclusion:

These results highlight the relevance of the school’s sociocultural, policy and physical environments in supporting class-based PA. Interventions testing optimization of the school physical, sociocultural and policy environments to support physical activity are warranted.

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David Kahan and Virginie Nicaise

Background:

Curriculum interventions aimed at increasing physical activity in schools may prove useful in contexts where changes in policy/environment are not feasible. Design/evaluation of interventions targeting minority groups is important in light of well-publicized health disparities. Religious minorities represent a special subset that may positively respond to interventions tailored to their unique beliefs, which to date have been relatively underreported.

Methods:

Muslim American youth (n = 45) attending a parochial middle school participated in a religiously- and culturally-tailored 8-wk, interdisciplinary pedometer intervention. School-time ambulatory activity was quantified using a delayed multiple-baseline across subjects ABA design. Visual analysis of graphic data as well as repeated-measures ANOVA and ANCOVA and post hoc contrasts were used to analyze step counts including the moderating effects of day type (PE, no-PE), gender, BMI classification, grade, and time.

Results:

The intervention elicited modest increases in males’ steps only with effect decay beginning midintervention. BMI classification and grade were not associated with changes in steps.

Conclusions:

Full curricular integration by affected classroom teachers, staff modeling of PA behavior, and alternative curriculum for girls’ PE classes may further potentiate the intervention.

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Maurice W. Martin, Sarah Martin and Paul Rosengard

Background:

PE2GO is a self-contained physical education (PE) program that provides classroom teachers with the tools they need to lead developmentally appropriate PE lessons. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the PE2GO pilot programs in 6 school districts across the United States.

Methods:

We used paper and pencil surveys at pre intervention (n = 114) and mid intervention (n = 94) and an electronic survey at post intervention (n = 65). In addition an electronic survey was sent to administrators at preintervention (n = 18); focus groups were conducted with teachers at mid intervention for a broader perspective. The study took place September 2004 through May 2005.

Results:

Results indicate that teachers were satisfied with the PE2GO program and the perceived effects it had on their students. Teachers reported that students increased their time engaged in physical activity (128.7−181.1 minutes per week pre-to-post intervention). Administrator support was important (ie, associated with improvement), but not always present.

Conclusion:

In conclusion, the PE2GO program holds promise for the concept of providing in-class physical activity opportunities for students.

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Dimitrios Aivazidis, Fotini Venetsanou, Nikolaos Aggeloussis, Vassilios Gourgoulis and Antonis Kambas

of the present study was to examine the effects of a multifaceted intervention involving classroom teachers and physical education (PE) teachers on the MC and PA of kindergarten children. Methods Study Design and Participants This study investigated the effects of the “Walk,” a PA project implemented

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Patrick Abi Nader, Evan Hilberg, John M. Schuna, Deborah H. John and Katherine B. Gunter

integrating physical activity in the academic classroom . Res Q Exerc Sport . 2014 ; 85 : 38 – 48 . https://search.proquest.com/openview/7a861188041d085d9cccb1e852323de7/1?pq-origsite=gscholar&cbl=40785 . 26. Cothran DJ , Kulinna PH , Garn AC , Hodges Kulinna P , Garn AC . Classroom teachers

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Hannah R. Thompson, Bhaani K. Singh, Annie Reed, Robert García, Monica Lounsbery, Benjamin D. Winig and Kristine A. Madsen

). Within each school, researchers similarly identified 3 school-level personnel to interview: (1) the school principal, (2) the PE teacher (when present), and (3) a randomly selected fifth-grade classroom teacher. Fifth-grade classroom teachers were selected because in California, fifth-grade students are